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19

It is valid because test could be a top-level domain and localpart@top-level-domain is a valid email address. See for example Email address, domain part


13

Chrome uses the WebKit rendering engine. Firefox uses the Gecko engine. Both interpret and display type slightly differently, as do the DirectX and Vega graphics engines used in IE9+ and Opera. You can't force browsers to render text identically, but you can do a couple of things to ensure that your navigation takes up the same width across browsers: Use ...


8

Do the latest version, and a quick check with the previous if you really want. There's a post someone did a few months back with graphs showing what happens to various browsers' versions once a new one comes out. It was primarily about Chrome, because of its automatic updating, but he also saw that since 4 Firefox has been doing basically the same thing: as ...


7

It's wise to use autofocus with a JavaScript fallback for browsers that don't support it. From Mark Pilgrim's Dive into HTML5 Forms: What’s that? You say you want your autofocus fields to work in all browsers, not just these fancy-pants HTML5 browsers? You can keep your current autofocus script. Just make two small changes: Add the ...


6

I haven't used it, but this extension looks like it does what you want: http://br.mozdev.org/multifox/


5

Actually, Spidermonkey (FF) and V8 (Chrome) are very similar in the core javascript engine API in that both try to be standards compliant. The main difference is that Spidermonkey tends to add some nice extras to their API if they feel it is needed. All of this is found at the Mozilla Development Center (MDC) for JavaScript and well documented if it is not ...


5

Try using this GreaseMonkey script and see if it works for you. http://userscripts.org/scripts/show/10687


5

Differences in font rendering between different browsers (and on different operating systems) is a fact of life. You just have to make sure that if the font displays at different widths your design can still cope.


5

As specified in comments, the extra-large fonts in Firefox would seem to be caused by the font-size-adjust property (which, incidentally, is only support by Firefox currently AFAIK). Removing this property altogether (or setting it to an appropriate value - see below) resolves the issue in Firefox. The idea behind font-size-adjust is to make fallback fonts ...


4

I tried it and it works perfectly for me. Note that the color and font-size properties won't have any effect in Chrome, since no text gets displayed. (Firefox displays the alt text if the image cannot be found.) Using the width property, for example, shows that it works fine. I'll post my code below for you to see. However, to your original question, ...


4

Use autocomplete="off" to disable autocomplete and Firefox (and other browsers who support this non-standard attribute) will not save those values. <input type=text" name="dontsave" autocomplete="off"> Edit: What you're seeing may be due to the field names you are using. Auto-complete looks for common username/login field names to work and your ...


4

Are you definitely testing the same URLs? If you are inputting your domain into one testing tool, then that checks if the home page on your site (ie the HTML) is sent gzipped. But if you open the page in Firefox and run Yslow it will check all linked files as well. Your HTML pages may be gzipped (probably as a result of a CMS) but CSS and JavaScript may not ...


4

I just go with 3.6 and the newest there is as there are not that many differences between them. Unless you use some really bleeding edge stuff, you should be OK with similar approach.


4

In client-server applications, the IP address of the client (i.e., the browser) is sent via the socket connection (the request) to the server (e.g., Apache). If the client is using a proxy server however, that may be the proxy's IP address instead of the client's IP. Remote_Addr is an ENV returned by the server and available to server-side ...


4

It is not recommended to cache resources with a query string. A query string usually represents a dynamic resource. However IE and Chrome do cache based off the Cache-Control and Expires headers. Firefox should cache, however, this could be due to a weak validation i.e. no usage of Etag. Using Etag forces strong validation of the cache-control mechanism ...


3

It all depends on what part of the world. Overall, yes Opera is the least used browser, but there are places like the Ukraine and Belarus, it's the most used browser. You can see some stats here: http://gs.statcounter.com/ Also, Opera is used a lot on mobile and console devices because of their compression services. In my opinion, I think the 2 biggest ...


3

The character is "ffi": Unicode Character 'LATIN SMALL LIGATURE FFI' (U+FB03) Why your computer is choosing a script font to handle it, I'd check your localization and internationalization settings for your computer.


3

I test with 3.6 and the latest version. I'm adding in the Android version soon although I don't anticipate there being any big differences there. Unless you're doing HTML5 stuff or something else along those lines you probably won't need to test every version.


3

Is there a plugin for FireFox that will allow me to view a website as if I was looking at it in IE 6? Unfortunately not, however there are a great number of on-line services that you can use for testing, or you could also install a stand-alone version of IE6 for testing on your own PC. On-line renderers: http://netrenderer.com/ http://browsershots.org/ ...


3

Here's the answer from a Mozilla developer: In Firefox 11/12, SPDY support is present but disabled by default. You will have to go into about:config and set network.http.spdy.enabled to true. In Firefox 13+ SPDY is enabled by default. If you are using those and are still not seeing the SPDY icon, please try https://spdytest.com/. If that still does not show ...


3

In my opinion, Firefox, Chrome and Safari already has sophisticate development tools with default distribution. Chrome has Developer Tools and Javascript console, Safari has a Develop Menu (enable in Preference), and many more in Firefox's Web Developer. So plugin such as Web developer become a handy tool from an essential element for web development like ...


3

Yes, Firebug will do just that.


3

Your find that neither Chrome or Firefox is rendering Ambient via the @Font-Face and what is happening is that the Crusive Font is rendering slightly different in Firefox than Chrome (Very Little Difference, but its using Crusive not Ambient, Fix posted below) Chrome, and Firefox render fonts differently from one another so sometimes you notice no change, ...


3

The culprit was in fact me. I had earlier installed a smaller subset of this font on my machine. Firefox and Internet Explorer (this is as far as I have checked) are rendering a font from the system, yet Chrome downloads the font even if you already have it.


3

You could edit your hosts file or run a DNS server on a local network to create a machine with a top level domain name. The email address will be only accessible if it's routed only within that local network but it's a possible configuration.


2

When a well behaved web browser encounters cached content, it generally still requests the head portion of the cached document so that it can ensure that the content hasn't changed since it was last cached. Just as long as the last-modified or content-length changes, then you shouldn't have a problem. Issues arise when your web server has explicitly told ...


2

Just have that page send out anti-caching headers every time a user loads it. This will force the browser to get a fresh copy of the page every time. You can do this without affecting the caching of the other pages in the site. You can use meta tags: <META HTTP-EQUIV="CACHE-CONTROL" CONTENT="NO-CACHE"> <META HTTP-EQUIV="PRAGMA" ...


2

Changing the submit button from type submit to type button will prevent the form from being submitted. http://jsfiddle.net/tfcuA/ If you click a submit button you'll need to "jam" the default submission behaviour by returning false or using jQuery's preventDefault. Otherwise have you Captcha handling code trigger from onsubmit on the form.


2

As the attribute selector is defined in the W3C CSS spec, you should be able to use it. But browsers implementations vary, and are more or less reliable. As you can see on SitePoint Reference support for CSS attribute selector, Webkit's support is buggy. You could also see that IE's css attribute selector support varies from one version to another. Thus ...



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