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15

It might come from 60 * 60 * 24 * 7 * 4 * 12 = 29030400 where each month consists of exactly 4 weeks.


10

She continued hosting the site (with all the back-issues available for free) until the beginning of this year, when she let the hosting lapse and the domain name expire. Was she aware that when it expires anyone can pick up that domain name for any reason? Some people don’t realize that an expired domain will be resold. I also posted to the ...


5

The only thing your friend can do to protect themselves is to contact a lawyer trying to assert copyright on the published material.


4

See http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html#sec14.9.3: The max-age directive on a response implies that the response is cacheable (i.e., "public") unless some other, more restrictive cache directive is also present. It's conceivable (likely?) that there are proxies in the wild which break this but since the only failure mode could be ...


3

So is there a way in S3 to set a dynamic Expires that is always one year from the request date? Not that I know of, and I doubt that dedicated support for this will be considered by the AWS team: You are probably aware that one can't set a dynamic Expires: ... value as such because The only value valid in an Expires header is a HTTP date; anything ...


2

I think that it would work although with the amount of time spent, you'd be better off guest blogging, writing press releases and making link bait, etc. As even if you got a pr5 site (I know page rank is not such a good measure nowadays but bear with me) you'd just end up with a load of links coming from one domain. You'd be much better off having them come ...


2

These headers are used to discourage browsers or proxies from caching the page. For dynamically generated content the headers would be there to try and ensure site visitors are always hitting the server and so are always getting up-to-the minute content. To answer your specific question, these headers may negatively affect performance because they may ...


2

Caching speeds up repeat views and not first time visits so in terms of SEO value it means little since the first view time is the most important factor. Caching is good however because it means when people switch from page to page they are only loading the resources they need so this will boost user experience. Using no-cache will disable the cache and ...


2

The expires header is related to the page, not fragments of it. Lets go over the basics. You send HTML to the browser, all of it or a stream, doesn't matter for the example. The browser receives it and starts parsing it. At the same time, once it starts parsing, all the other linked files are called, like images, css, js, etc. Some parallel connections ...


1

Google considers redirecting content that is no longer available to be "soft 404". They would like to be able to treat the page the same as a 404 page. If you redirect the expired page to your home page, Google will identify it as a soft 404. It will appear in Google Webmaster Tools as an error. Google won't pass the link juice from inbound links to ...


1

The ideal scenario is to keep the content so that it's still indexed, even if not useful. I'll explain: I worked on a video website that while worked with user submitted videos, sometimes we received requests to remove them. This lead to a lot of 404's being returned which wasn't good for SEO. We approached a redirect to the homepage but the number was so ...


1

Your best option is to back-order the domain name with a reputable and established Domain Name provider such as 123-reg, GoDaddy, eNom. Obviously there will be a battle as to which provider is quickest at registering once the clock runs out so hopefully you're the only person with it on back-order!


1

No, you can't change the expiry headers for remote files that aren't under your control. The only way you could would be to host them on your own server - however you then remove the advantage of these files being hosted on powerful CDNs and the font files are probably already stored in other user's browser caches. There are work-around methods to use PHP ...


1

Doing that won't get your sited banned or not indexed by Google, but you might rank better if you optimize for caching, for example browser caching setting expires headers far in the future for static files that don't change too often; Google takes into account how fast your pages are, because they encourage optimizing website speed for better user ...


1

As a developer myself I wouldn't even call that a bug, more of a snafu. Pulling the rug out from under an application like that and expecting it to all continue to work perfectly is simply asking too much out of your software. I'd have ignored that request too. Why not file the bug with the OS vendor (aside from the fact that MS just chuckles at bug reports ...


1

It seem it tells browser that the cache expires after 1 year, 31461276 seconds means 1 year. More details in this post: EXPIRES VS. MAX-AGE


1

Ah! I want Cache-Control: private. See the tutorial here: http://www.mnot.net/cache_docs/#EXPIRES


1

Without seeing the headers for when you reloaded the page it is a little hard to double check some things. One thing I do notice is that the dates/times don't seem correct (though this may just be an artefact of how you copied and pasted your question). The response from Google's server says the Date is Thu, 01 Mar 2012 20:58:10 GMT while your js says it ...



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