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8

Correct, the crossdomain.xml file is requested to determine if Flash and Silverlight apps are "allowed" to access your website. Personally, I think it's a really dumb convention, but.. it's out there. For Microsoft Silverlight When calling a cross-domain service, Silverlight will check for the existence of clientaccesspolicy.xml first. This is the ...


5

I think it's too hard to debug those JS-files, costs much more time, as you can expect somebody here to do. I suggest, that you remove all scripts and flash from your page, and put them back one after one, testing each one looking for the phenomenon, when it comes back again. That way you can be sure, which script or flash object is buggy. But even if you ...


4

Your error log shows that the Zend framework can't find the PDO MySQL driver it needs to connect to the MySQL server. This could be for a couple of reasons: It's possible your server is running an old version of PHP. (The PDO class is only included in PHP 5.1 or later.) Check what version you're running by creating a file called 'info.php' containing the ...


4

[error] [client 173.200.xxx.xx] (12)Cannot allocate memory: couldn't spawn child process for: /home/mywebsite/public_html/index.php According to the error message, your server is running out of RAM. In case of shared hosting, it normally happens when the server is no longer able to handle the increasing number of accounts hosted on that machine. You might ...


4

You should use a permanent redirect to tell GoogleBot and others where the page has moved to. If the page no longer exists at all then you can add entries in robots.txt to tell bots not to access the missing page: User-agent: * Disallow: /extraNeus.php


4

put this in .htaccess file (change the path/to/files to your file locations) Redirect 301 /extraNeus.php http://www.yoursite.com/new_page.php you can leave it in there forever or next time google indexes the page you should be good to remove it.


4

This is unlikely to be "visitors" (real people) but is likely to be automated software testing for vulnerabilities in the software run by your website. I've seen these types of requests for years. The most common for my servers is requests for WordPress administration pages and Microsoft FrontPage extensions. If you are not running the software, these ...


3

It's probably because Xenu is trying to pull up the page to verify the link is valid but Wikipedia is blocking it because it is an unauthorized bot. They probably are blocking a long list of crawlers and bots that are not related to search engines (i.e. link checkers, spammers, scrapers, etc).


3

The path after AuthUserFile is the place in the filesystem where the file lives, and you need to know where your web hosting space root really is. For example, when I FTP in to my space it looks like the root is / and the web root is /public_html, but in fact on the server the root is /home/companyname and the web root is /home/companyname/public_html. You ...


3

Cloudfront is Amazon's Content Delivery Network. This answer should help explain the messages in the log: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9197918/why-is-cloudfront-loading-scripts-in-my-web-app-i-dont-use-it. The conclusion is As mentioned upfront already, I share the initial conclusion that the code itself is probably harmless, although the ...


3

OK, I found the problem. My site uses SPIP3 which has a bug when the sitemap is GET by googlebot see http://forum.spip.net/fr_245670.html?tri_recherche=date Just fix config/ecran_securite.php by adding an @ before array_shift() somewhere near to the end of file. (edit) I forgot: thanks to http://web-sniffer.net/ too. Just set the user agent to ...


3

The best solution to ensure they don't get indexed is by adding <meta name="robots" content="noindex"> If Google only encounters the pages as error pages it shouldn't index them, however, potentially if they were accessible through the sitemap or had inbound links, they could be indexed. It's advisable to just add the noindex tag to prevent ...


3

I would say yes, simply because there isn't any need for dynamic error pages. For example: If your database is down or under pressure, it is unlikely that you will want your error pages to be attempting database connections. Likewise, if your server is under pressure, you don't want your error pages to be carrying out any server-side processing. All-in-all, ...


3

This really depends on the error being served. For a 404 error, there would be no reason that there are any issues with the server - meaning all the php stuff should be working find. But if you have a 500 there may be an issue with the server, preventing php from running. This really depends on your tolerance for risk.


2

This file contains permissions for flash applications. It is requested by any flash app embedded on your site. (Just like favicon or robots.txt)


2

Have a look at this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2541797/javascript-errors-from-google-adsense.


2

The &Acirc; entity represents  in HTML, however, your feed should contain a literal  (with a supported encoding type) instead of the HTML entity.


2

It means it couldn't connect to the LDAP instance you specified. Make sure your configuration under Administer >> Site Configuration >> LDAP Integration is correct. You can refer to the documentation here. Try connecting with an LDAP client like JXplorer to validate that your LDAP instance is up an running at the host and port you think it is. If ...


2

You can use the error_reporting function at the top of each file to get round the fact that your server doesn't seem to be obeying what you've configured.


2

Your site shouldn't immediately drop connections when the maximum number of concurrent connections has been reached, unless your host has something in place specifically to handle this case (see below). In Apache, the MaxClients directive is used to set the maximum number of concurrent connections. Anything beyond this limit will go into a queue to be ...


2

Google likes to know if your pages are having trouble. In doing so it can keep up-to-date information of your pages. If you send back 500 error, Google + your users will know you are having problems and come back later. I suggest keeping the 500 response fix up the issue.


2

This really depends on what you consider an error, there are quite a number of things users would consider an error that simply are not measurable or quantifiable, this is why testing and user lab research are so important. Hard errors like 404 and 500 are easy to monitor and fix but many 'errors' are down to poor or inconsistent design/IA, or a simple lack ...


2

Googlebot uses code that is custom to Google for converting the HTML pages into text. Google has not released this code, and nobody is sure exactly what they do in all cases. Usually Googlebot just sees the page source and removes the HTML tags. There are many programs that can download the source code of a page (even masquerading as the Googlebot user ...


2

Have you tried contacting Tumblr with your username then contacting your vendor that you bought the domain from? Could be a server related issue on Tumblr's side, same thing happens with Twitter occasionally.


2

Make sure that you uploaded the required html file.If you have multiple google accounts.It will make problems. You can also try alternative verifying methods like TXT,CNAME Etc . Gook Luck !,


2

Pages that return a 404 not found or 410 Gone code are not indexed by search engines. From Google webmasters center: This HTTP response code clearly tells both browsers and search engines that the page doesn’t exist. As a result, the content of the page (if any) won’t be crawled or indexed by search engines. We recommend that you always return a ...


2

A request for a directory listing will have a URL that ends in /. So http://example.com/images/ will be a 403 because of the directory listing. http://example.com/private/document.html will be a 403 because of your rule for the private directory.


2

Unfortunately general website security is too broad for this "Pro Webmasters Stackexchange" format. How you handle this depends entirely on the size of your company and what you're trying to secure. If its a simple website without confidential data, just ignore them and make sure any control panels are hard to find / ip restricted. Example: Change the ...


2

Some bots and older browsers Some bots and older browsers will ignore custom favicon paths and will attempt to fetch a locally stored favicon from the root /. A simple fix would be to copy the favicon from the CDN and store it locally on the site just to satisfy those bots and browsers, you could also setup a redirect using something like redirect 301 ...


2

It depends on your situation. Your PHP could also handle the lack of database connection in a nice way. But if you have a custom PHP with many possibilities for bugs and problems, go for an HTML page. If you're using a system such as Drupal or WordPress it's best to go with whatever is provided there, possibly adding something such as a module such as ...



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