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1

As much as this idea is interesting, I'd have to say no. The reason is because we have to look at every device in existence, and since desktops are still in use today, one could still have a very old computer and use the old-fashioned lynx web browser to browse web pages, and I'm pretty sure in that browser you'll have a hard time detecting mouse movements. ...


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An Offer can reference a PriceSpecification item with the priceSpecification property: One or more detailed price specifications, indicating the unit price and delivery or payment charges. This definition refers to the three PriceSpecification sub-classes: DeliveryChargeSpecification PaymentChargeSpecification UnitPriceSpecification But if these ...


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The easiest way to track traffic by source is Google Analytics is to use the "campaigns" feature. This requires that you put "utm" parameters on the landing page for each franchisee. Here is the page where you can build URLs with the correct parameters: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1033867?hl=en Then instead of ...


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It all boils down to what you're planning to do and what your expectations are (and whether they're realistic). Your website isn't up yet, and the question you should ask yourself is: are you expecting to receive traffic from Google? Getting customers to find your website through some search engine? If the answer is yes, then don't start with an inventory ...


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No, you won't be banned. It's mostly talk unless you're scraping exact match data or copying things like data_elements/html_entities/css/classing/theme along with it. But even if there is no "ban", Google may "filter" [truncate] you into the duplicate scope and therefore out of first results, forcing user to go to last page of search results to trigger a ...


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absolutely yes. Site with little or no original content is for Google like an affiliate website, which promotes a third part product with third part content and cuts cookie. https://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.de/2008/09/demystifying-duplicate-content-penalty.html https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/76465


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I think the software is missing the point of 301 and 302 redirects completely. Their purpose is to act as signposts to actual "documents" with actual content the client is requesting. 301 means the document has permanently moved to a different url 302 means the document has temporarily moved to a different url The scenario you are describing sounds more ...



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