Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Without a doubt, you need to disclose these practices in your term of service and privacy policy. My rule of thumb is that you probably shouldn't collect anything that you wouldn't feel comfortable explaining to your users or disclosing publicly (what if you ended up having to explain it in court?). Obviously, you need to be very careful (PCI compliance ...


1

With addition to PatomaS response. Not only would using rel=canonical be incorrect but you could also cause serious SEO issues and maybe un-indexing of some webpages via google. For example, you have a webpage a.com/abc and you have a webpage called a.com/adc you put rel=canonical on a.com/abc pointing to a.com/adc and a.com/adc points to itself you are ...


3

The reason to use the rel=canonical shouldn't be the term users use to get to the site, but the content. If each page has different content and/or different reason to exist, like index and content, then there is no need for canonical, even more, it's use would be incorrect, semantically speaking. What you should do, for instance, is improve the product ...


1

With me helping with the back-end system for a web hosting company, we strive to make sure our customers personal data is secured by SSL and we do encrypt their name, address, and phone numbers to just make sure if there is any data breaches, there should be minimal damage as possible. Trust is one thing when it comes to having loyal clients. As for your ...


1

You'll want to use SSL for any pages in the checkout process, for sure. Encrypting address data in your own database is optional. If someone were able to access your database, they'd likely be able to get your encryption key also, so that would provide little defense. Also name and address are not nearly as sensitive of information as credit card data.



Top 50 recent answers are included