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9

See About Sitemaps, from Google: Sitemaps are particularly helpful if: Your site has dynamic content. Your site has pages that aren't easily discovered by Googlebot during the crawl process—for example, pages featuring rich AJAX or images. Your site is new and has few links to it. (Googlebot crawls the web by following links from one ...


7

Since meta tags have no influence on your page's rankings, but can be used in a page's listing in the search results, I would make sure the description tag is written like a sales piece. It can be the deciding factor for users when deciding which search result to click on. The keywords tag is obsolete so I wouldn't worry about the order of the keywords in ...


7

I'm going to answer this from an SEO perspective since the comments on your question do a good job of addressing the other issues at hand. Because the pages on your site will have very little content (I am assuming you are showing an image and possibly a description of it) if your pages have the same <title> and <h1> tags they will be very ...


6

The ampersand (&) character is a reserved character in XML (sitemaps are XML) and must be replaced with an XML entity that represents it. In this case that would be &amp; (all entities start with ampersand which is why it is reserved). When the XML is parsed the &amp; entity in your url will be translated into plain &.


4

Your question needs to be clearer. Dynamic how? When getting information from a database? Or when a user interacts with a web page in such a way that a new page is not requested from the server? Here's a generallized answer that hopefully helps to clear things up. The title of a page can be dynamic in two ways: it is done serverside before being sent to ...


3

Since it based on rendering plain files from a git repository, I don't think you can use dynamic information. The goals of Github Pages is to show a static site easily from an open source project. You can still contact them and I think you have a dedicated support if you use Github Enterprise.


3

If you want to change the page title without reloading the page then you'll have to do it in javascript: document.title = 'Your new title'; You'll have to set the title even if you just want to change a part of it. And if you want to update the title when a refresh occurs then you'll have to do it using your server side scripts.


3

Meta Tags are so 'SEO 1.0', you need RDFa semantic markup - 'SEO 2.0'. If you check out the Good Relations schema there are case studies about how these work for big brands that have implemented RDFa. http://purl.org/goodrelations/


3

The search engines see what your users see as they are no different from them. They request a page and the page's content is delivered to them. Remember, server side stuff happens before the page is served. Query strings are part of the URL and search engines always include them when crawling a site so unless you link to the page without the query string, ...


3

If I understand your question, and you already know that a sprite is really just an image-combining-image, then the last part you need to know is about the CSS. The CSS is what associates a portion of your image with a state. You create the html representing the button, assign it a class, then you write up your CSS. .my-button{ width:20px; ...


3

Creating an XML sitemap index and including XML sitemaps for each of the sections on your site can be a useful way of tracking how well Google is indexing pages in these sections. This gives you a useful set of data to take into account when deciding what areas to spend time on when creating content, link building, and other activities. You can obtain ...


2

There are two types of sitemaps and it's not clear which one you are referring to. The type artlung is talking about above is an XML based sitemap used by search engines. The one it sounds like you're referring to is a sitemap page on the users site (like this) The xml sitemap you should definatley have and add to Google Webmaster tools in an effort to get ...


2

The unfortunate thing about the Google article you posted is that it's almost creating more myths than it quashes. It's true that search engines do not have any problems indexing dynamic URLs, but static-looking URLs still tend to rank better. The main reason is that when you create static URLs they are less "watered down" with irrelevant characters and ...


2

Until recently it was becoming increasingly common to see mobile versions of websites, where the URL is entirely different, such as m.example.com or example.com/mobile. This is often more convenient than sending mobile users to the regular site, but it has drawbacks, such as complicating SEO, doubling the design code you have to maintain, and making it ...


2

Let assume someone types a longtail keyword, how do you dynamically generate a page with those keywords? You cannot dynamically generate a page to appear in search results after the search has been run (unless you control the search engine) so you appear to be either asking how highlight the terms a user entered as part of his or her search on your ...


2

Large websites are launched everyday. The number of pages appearing at once isn't the issue, as crawl depth is a factor of page-rank. Its a sudden number of back-links that can raise a red-flag (less so now in today's link-bait webscape). So, answer no.1: No issue with publishing 40,000 URLs. I'd be wary of how "thin" that content is though - yellow pages ...


2

This sounds like you want to index search results. If I'm right, it's against Google's guidelines, according to Matt Cutts. I recommend you to only index valuable content and not auto generated pages.


2

Having any email address exposed you run the risk of having the spam bots collecting that email address, there are methods that I'll list that can help you but its just like a car alarm, a car alarm can help prevent your car being stolen but it doesn't necessary mean it can't. Bots are forever becoming more complex and many are rendering pages just like real ...


2

Google doesn't care about if you use static or dynamic content for your pages because Google bots analyze the final HTML. That's why a full HTML/CSS (without PHP) website can rank very well on Google. However, Google likes fresh content but dynamic content and fresh content are different things. I encourage you to often add new pages on your website to tell ...


1

You cannot tell them but give them a strong hint by providing a sitemap. Google may or may not index those these even with a sitemap. It will tell you how many of the sitemap files were indexed. You need a Google Webmaster Tools account and register your website with them. Once done, sitemap submissions and index status appears the reports. From a search ...


1

If you want your AJAX website be friendly to search bots then you will have to make sure that the fragment identifier in the URL changes every time a visitor clicks something to have a content reloaded and, and that identifier starts the exclamation mark to communicate to the bots that your website follows a specific convention. That convention means that ...


1

Create the basic form of the main page to let the bot get the information it needs and continue with the dynamic contents. edit: you made a general question which theoretically don't have a specific answer but actually to help you start-up your project i'm doing something like this: client requests a page. server creates dynamically a basic page with the ...


1

If you use semantic web syntax and sitemaps, search engines will not be clueless about your content and will understand that essentially it remains the same and only the details are changing.


1

If the topic or category of the content on your home page is drastically changing, Google really doesn't know what to rank your home page for so be sure to set a good title, and description, and try and have some static copy on your home page which isn't changing that Google can use to help rank your site. You may want to categorize the promotions so that ...


1

Google has stated they do not want to index search results from other sites (IE their search results leading someone else's search results is considered poor customer experience) so you'll have an uphill battle to get them indexed and ranked. Beyond that what you'll need to do is get some links from your home page to some of the search results, as you ...


1

You should filter "/tagged/" so you don't get duplicate content. The 200 posts are your most important content. However, if you do want to add all 1900 then you should add <priority>0.4</priority> in your sitemap to all of the pages with with "/tagged/" and set the core 200 pages to 0.8; with the homepage at 1.0.


1

Both options are what you should be striving for. You want to make it easy for your users and search engines to find your content. As for the XML sitemap, if your goal is to become as large as Facebook then you better be prepared to deal with things on a large scale and that includes sitemaps.


1

Does your client accesses page through browser? If so in every directory you can put a php file which can show list of files as per your rules. Another approach You can redirect user to a specific PHP file where you can show lists as per your rules by comparing referal URL.


1

If your host uses Apache and allows mod_proxy you can set up a virtual host like this: <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName www.def.com ProxyPass / http://www.abc.com ProxyPassReverse / http://www.abc.com </VirtualHost> This will have the server query the remote site and return it to the user through the new domain.


1

Since your index is PHP, all you need is to modify the link using PHP. So, in your index.php between the HTML you would have something like: <a href="affiliate.com/my_affiliate_code_here_<?php echo $_GET['id']; ?>">Link Text</a> So, when someone goes to: index.php?id=test1 The link would go to affiliate.com/my_affiliate_code_here_test1 ...



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