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For paginated page or other variations, you can put canonical tag to parent page. This will solve problem. For example: example.com/rock-music-list-1/ example.com/rock-music-list-2/ example.com/rock-music-list-3/ example.com/rock-music-list-4/ all with canonical example.com/rock-music-list


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I do not know WordPress at all. There may be an option for this. I would check the documentation. You should not need to do a redirect. Apache will do this for you. Otherwise, see if the /etc/apache2/mods-enabled/ directory has dir.conf and dir.load exist, then in your /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/ directory you should find a .conf file for your site. If you ...


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On an apache server with mod_rewrite installed, you can add this code to your httpd.conf (main apache configuration file) and restart apache gracefully. RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^(.*)/$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ %1 [NC,R=301,L] It will redirect all URL requests ending ...


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I disagree with dhaupin, it is an issue that is every common with blog pagination and few SEO plugins, themes, templates make it right. The first page should contain <link rel="next" href="url-to-page-2"> The second page and following pages should contain: <link rel="previous" href="url-to-page-1"> <link rel="next" ...


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You can externally redirect from the "ugly" (for want of a better term) URL to the "friendly" URL. However, you need to be careful of redirect/rewrite loops. One way of avoiding the rewrite loop is to check against THE_REQUEST - this contains the initial request header as sent from the client and is not changed as the rewrite engine rewrites the URL. This ...


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The first thing you have to know is that Google uses your HTML DOM (document object model) to determine where content begins and ends. It can do this fairly well with one page, but uses more than one to know exactly what HTML fragments are header, footer, sidebar, etc. and removes these sections for content analysis. This means that templating is taken ...


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No. Even though the layout is exactly the same across all pages, that accounts for a small percent of the entire source code of any page. If you have tons of unique content per page, then the layout code would make up an even smaller percentage of duplicate content. However, If your layout consists of a side panel with almost the same text for every page, ...


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Duplicates like these are a thing of the past if you have set up proper schemas/relations/canonicals in regards to pagination: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/1663744?hl=en Note this too from the bottom of that article: rel="next" and rel="prev" are orthogonal concepts to rel="canonical". This means that each page is it's own canonical, ...


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There's nothing to worry about here, since http://example.com and http://example.com/ are the same URL. The useragent has to include a path in the HTTP request (as per RFC 2616), so what it sends to the server will be GET / in either case. If you add the verbose flag to CURL this is quite easy to verify: $ curl -v http://example.com * Rebuilt URL to: ...


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Potentially, having the the same resource accessible on multiple URLs (ie. multiple slashes) is duplicate content. However, whether this is really a duplicate content problem is another matter. For it to be a "problem" the search engines need to be finding references of these URLs before it is going to start crawling them. And it's likely to need a ...


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Anything in an iframe can't be indexed in the first place. So if you're not wanting the page to be found by what is said in the reveiws, an iframe is definitely the way to go as it will also make it so that you won't have to worry about duplicate content.


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You have 2 options - iframe, as you suggested by yourself, or adding them dynamically with JavaScript. There is no other way to prevent that content from indexing without using noindex on the whole page.


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I would ask what the impact would be if you do not use the canonical tag? Answer? Disastrous. Since you have duplicated content, then you are effecting your search performance. There is a penalty in the SERPs for this. You will not know otherwise. It is likely that the penalty exists for you now and you may not realize it assuming that this condition has ...


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You can use rel=canonical on the other sites since Google supports cross-domain canonical tag. However, your clone sites will not be indexed for those pages which kind of defeats the purpose. Best option is to always have original content on your sites and custom tailor each for your target audience. To have a successful website you need to provide value to ...


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Actually setting the hreflang in the .com as you suggest - <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-SA" href="company.com.sa/FAQ-page" /> is a way to go. Hreflang is setted on page by page basis, so if the FAQ is the only page in the .sa domain in English - you must set it as en-SA just for that page. The cleanest way is to set hreflang for the whole ...


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Duplicate content is no longer determined in a linear fashion. Today, duplicate content is determined using a semantic scoring method so that near duplicate content will still be seen as duplicate. This is because spammers would simply rearrange the content to avoid content as being flagged as duplicate. As well, n-gram phrase recognition is used to ...


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Which ever page is referenced as the canonical is the one that will show in SERP's. The other will likely not. If the content of the page is very similar or identical, yes it is duplicate content. The domain hosting the content is irrelevant. No, hreflang is used to specify pages where the content is the same, but in alternate languages. In your case both ...



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