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There is a video at Google Webmasters Youtube channel that presents a slide with a closed list of what is considered by Google as a duplicate content: What's duplicate content? Exact same page, or same content (or piece of content) www / non-www / http / https / index.html / ?utm=... Separate mobile-friendly URLs, printer-friendly URLs, CDN ...


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In both cases, adding content to your site (whether original or a translation) does not per se improve SEO. What you need are inbound links. If those posts get you inbound links, then they will improve SEO. If they don't, other than possibly adding a few matches for non-competitive requests, they won't do much for you.


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It all boils down to what you're planning to do and what your expectations are (and whether they're realistic). Your website isn't up yet, and the question you should ask yourself is: are you expecting to receive traffic from Google? Getting customers to find your website through some search engine? If the answer is yes, then don't start with an inventory ...


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It is fully normal, that traffic drops after such basic change of URL structure. Google needs time to get the new structure, to re-index pages, to understand, whether the content changed and so on. I would say, the drop time is from 1 up to 5-6 weeks long. But you can speed up the re-indexing with new sitemap and new content, which is backlinked externally. ...


2

Okay. I will try and explain what I know the best that I can quickly. Perhaps just explaining some of this will make things clear. In the early days of Google, a term index would be, in effect, a relational or leaf table that tied terms in a term index (forward and reversed) to a document using a docID and wordID with other metrics. Part of semantic ...


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I assume, Google decides about indexing through measuring of duplication (or similarity) rate of certain page on URL basis and indexes all pages, containing less then 100% (or 90%, or X% - only Google knows exactly the number) duplicate (if nothing, like noindex, prevents it). Finding duplicated content isn't a trivial task and is error-prone because of ...


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Just about every website you visit will at least have a certain percentage of duplicate content. A perfect example of this is a logo specific to the website that appears on all content pages to indicate that the content is part of the website itself. This kind of thing is something google will index in its entirety (provided of course the rest of the content ...


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Accidentally that pages went visible for all and Google indexed them. The first day they ranked good as I can see in the search console but after that it seems that they got a penalty.... I have a gut feeling Google catches on to things when people leave unfinished pages available for a set period of time. As for me, I happen to test, test, and test ...


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Having some duplicate content within your site is not a problem. If a page has too much duplicate content, Google may choose not to index it. If there is some duplicate content, Google may choose not to include the duplicated sections of the page in the index for that page. Google won't penalize your entire site for duplicating content between pages. ...


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You don't have to worry much about content that is duplicated within your own website. When Google detects duplicated content within a website it simply chooses one of the duplicated pages to index and ignores the rest. It doesn't index them, but it also doesn't penalize the site in any way. If there is also unique content on those pages, Google will ...


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Any time that you host content that is published elsewhere you need to consider copyright law and duplicate content SEO. To host files yourself, you would need permission from the manufacturers to copy the files. I assume that this wouldn't be a problem for most of them because they are trying to sell a product, not protect the contents of the manuals ...


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I have a far simpler solution that allows you to maintain user friendliness of your URLs. Here's the .htaccess code: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^(.*).php/?$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)/?$ /? [R=301,L] The idea is, any guest trying to access anything on the domain that ends in .php (regardless of the case of the extension) with or without the ...


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Your way of thinking is good for development and testing purposes, Not in production level as you are making external calls, every time users visit a product (Even if they don't actually want to get the file!) Which is horrible. I would suggest hosting all PDF files on your own server (If it is not against the manufacturer copyright policy). Two ...


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When you change an existing URL structure you need to redirect the old URLs (that have probably been indexed and linked to) to the new URLs. (For the benefit of SEO and user experience.) In your case the old URLs (with a .php extension) - that have been indexed - are still accessible and return the same content as the URL without the .php extension. So, you ...


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Noindex is a fine option for dealing with duplicate content. I have used: robots.txt -- Prevents Googlebot from finding the content to begin with, saves bandwidth. Google may end up indexing some pages that have external links, but only with inbound anchor text. Won't pass PageRank from external links. meta robots noindex tag -- Allows Googlebot to ...



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