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42

What we generally do, at work is : before we update, the document root of the server is : in /www/app-2009-09-01 but is accessed via a symbolic link, called /www/application we put the whole new code base to /www/app-2009-09-08 once the whole code base is there : we remove the old symbolic link we create a new symbolic link, still called ...


8

Options: Set up a local site for testing purposes. Something like WAMP should do the trick. If you're going to do the testing on your live server, temporarily block your site while doing your testing. A 307 HTTP response would be appropriate. Use basic authentication to keep crawlers and everybody else out while you do your testing. Since your site will be ...


7

First of all, unless you planned on the site going down every day at the same time, you have a hosting problem and you should fix that ASAP. There just isn't any good reason for your current hosting provider to go offline that often, for that long, and that consistently. If it is a planned outage, please be sure to serve up a notice so there isn't a bare ...


7

You can use virtual hosts in apache to have 2 versions of the code at 2 different urls. A commonly used example is: test.example.com -> /var/www/version1.2 www.example.com -> /var/www/version1.1 both of which are on the same server, but perhaps only one is accessible to the world. Once you are satisfied that test.example.com is working, you can ...


6

Are you on a Linux/BSD machine? If so, you can easily use symbolic links to accomplish this goal. Create Version 1 of the site here: /var/www/www.example.org.v1 Create a symbolic link pointing to this directory cd /var/www ln -s www.example.com.v1 www.example.com This should give you a directory listing (ls -la) that looks something like this: ...


5

Don't do testing in a production environment if at all possible. It's a recipe for disaster. Create a testing subdomain that's isolated from your production site as much as possible. This will allow you to test you changes on the server without, hopefully, endangering your production site. You can use robots.txt to block 'bots from this subdomain so it ...


4

Well, should have checked the NameCheap knowledgebase, first: How to transfer a domain into Namecheap without a huge downtime? NameCheap offers a FreeDNS service so their name servers can start handling DNS requests before a transfer. I suppose it would keep working when transferring away from NameCheap, too.


4

It's really very hard to suggest anything without more information, the nameserver thing is weird but not unheard of in the messy world of DNS. If I had to guess I'd say it's something local rather than your site. The most common cause I've seen for this kind of thing is the adblock plugin, cached DNS information or overactive antivirus/antimalware. I'd ...


3

You must check that your site is available from outside of your network. You can use sites like http://www.downforeveryoneorjustme.com/ to check that your site is accessible. If it passes this test, then likely there is nothing for you to do. I have seen issues such as this where a network is failing to resolve the domain name, or fails to deliver either ...


3

I think you really should look into a mirroring structure to perform this kind of work. However, if you can't do this, the best way to decide when to perform this maintenance work would be to observe the hourly traffic on your web site so you will be able to figure out what is the best timeframe. Also try to determine most timeframes as possible, that way ...


3

While Will is correct that the retry-after value is optional, I'd suggest setting it anyway as a matter of practice. Setting the value has the benefit of being unambiguous. A 503 without retry-after "should be handled as a 500." If any crawler/script/etc. requesting the documents has been configured to treat 500 differently, then you can't be entirely ...


3

The best way to do this is usually to do the load balancing inside your network where everything's under your control, eg with a load balancing proxy, a floating IP or internal routing. However, if these servers are on different unaffiliated networks as you say, this is generally not practical. The other method to achieve this is using DNS failover, but ...


3

Check into UptimeRobot http://www.uptimerobot.com It's free, offers HTTP and ping monitoring every 5 minutes with email, text and RSS notifications. To my soon to be former webhost's chagrin, it's very reliable with uptime monitoring logs and past event tracking.


2

In your case, the solution should be at least 2 servers with the same content and a frontend proxy which proxies the traffic to the servers and handles failover in case one server is down. But it is a quite complex configuration and you probably need to hire a sysadm to configure and manage it unless you know what you are doing.


2

mon.itor.us and SiteUptime have free/ad-supported plans. Check are only at 30-minute intervals however. They both have plan upgrades which measure at 5 minute intervals and are cheaper than Pingdom, so you might find a reasonable cost/benefit trade-off.


2

http://aremysitesup.com/ offers a free plan with 15 minute interval checking, or a paid plan (from $5.42/month) for 5 minute interval checking. If you're just monitoring one site, pingdom's free account offers 1-minute interval checking -- you just need to login once every 90 days to keep it alive: https://www.pingdom.com/signup/free/ (If you're monitoring ...


2

Google, and all the other Search Engines, crawlers, bots, etc., crawl your site every day (if your site is big enough indeed). Google crawls the important pages for changes at a higher rate, like your homepage and your highest quality content pages, and randomly the rest of your pages to make sure that it's up to date. Now, the pages that randomly Google ...


2

Use Scalr Fault-tolerance, backups, uptime, and efficiency Scalr provides you with a high uptime, fault-tolerant website: Scalr monitors all your servers for crashes, and replaces any that fail. It backups your data at regular intervals, and uses Amazon EBS for database storage. And to make sure you never pay more than you should, Scalr ...


1

I've had a similar problem before and have solved it using CloudFlare's API. I had a Dedicated server and a large VPS for backup. Mirrored the data on the two servers, and used CloudFlare to switch between them (DNS Failover) if the Dedicated went down. Initially did reboots via SSH/IPMI to verify and it worked as configured. Here's the link to the article: ...


1

James, sorry to say but i don't think it will automatically gain previous position by just uploading same content and fixing Google webmaster suggestion. As your website was down for such a long time and it lost all its credential/rankings/ and other reputation. As search engine does not love 404 pages !! Apart from this, there are many updates rolled out ...


1

Set up a second server with the updated codebase and switch them as fast as possible. :-) If not possible, make sure your codebase is divided into dozens of smaller parts. Then the downtime would be limited to just one subpart one at the time. The smaller codeblocks are easier to replace and most will just continue to run without problems. Just try this on ...


1

Pending my CMS question above, there are ways to redirect all traffic to a maintenance page, so that it doesn't look like your site's dead. (It seems like you're thinking of actually taking the site down meanwhile.) Here's a method with htaccess, assuming you're on an Apache server.


1

Its a simple solution. Buy hosting service from two different providers. Preferably in different geographic regions. For DNS of your site example.com use the two different IP addresses from the providers. Example. ISP #1 assigns you IP aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd IPS #2 assigns you IP www.xxx.yyy.zzz Then your DNS entry would look like aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd ...


1

I understand that the client is always right, but I think it would be in your (and his) best interest that this is an unattainable goal. There are reasons why hosts don't promised 100% uptime: because they can't anticipate the future. I once had a client like this that started complaining when his website went down for the first time in 6 months. I ...


1

In IIS you can set up a second virtual directory with your updates. You then redirect all requests, or remap the bindings of the second site to your desired host name Http Redirection in IIS 7: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732930(WS.10).aspx



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