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5

Short answer: a registrar can register their own domains just like anyone else. Longer answer: Behind the domain name system is a network of registry operators; in the case of gTLDs (global top level domains - eg. com, net, org and many, many others) the registry operator is ICANN. Each registrar (GoDaddy, Namecheap etc.) is accredited by the registry ...


3

We get this question a lot. Use canonical tags (at least). A canonical tag simply points to the original page. It allows Google to know which page is to be indexed. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/139066?hl=en Look for the heading Indicate the preferred URL with the rel="canonical" link element for an example. There is also other good ...


1

If it was shared hosting, you need to have an assigned domain name to the hosting plan you chose. You can see this when going to My Account and under the Products tab. Try to open that domain name in a new browser tab, if you did not grab another domain or this is not the case, then you need to double check your nameserver settings. BlueHost's Zone file ...


1

As per GoDaddy's policy, please follow these steps: Verify that you uploaded your files to the appropriate directory. Make sure that you named the first page of your website "index.htm" or "default.htm." Ensure that your DNS is pointed correctly.


2

My experience is that if the nameservers point away from the registrar i.e. the DNS is hosted elsewhere, then a change of registrar does not affect DNS at all.


1

All the registrar holds on you is your account information and name server entries, your DNS records are hosted by your DNS host which in many instances is the same as your web host. Just transfer the domain name and give them your name server addresses and within 48 hours it should be fine.


2

I tried to redirect the plural domain to singular domain but it had some negative impact. What "negative impact"? What you are proposing (linking to just one domain) is essentially the same thing, but in a roundabout sort of way. Is it bad... Bad for who? It's harder to maintain (depending on how you manage your links). Costs a few more bytes ...


1

I tend to start out at the original Network Solutions WHOIS database. When I run into a name server for another registrar, I'll go over to that registrar's website. Then I'll look for another WHOIS link on their page, which will search the 2nd registrar's internal database. Sometimes the contact info won't be listed in the 1st registrar's DB, but it will be ...


2

No. If you search the Network Solutions WhoIs database, you only get 2 search options: By Domain Name By IP Address If you search for a zip code like: "90210", it will try to lookup "90210.com". It won't search for all domains in the 90210 (Beverly Hills, CA) zip code.


1

You are confusing web hosting with email hosting. The company that hosts your website, while they are usually your email host as well, aren't always. Have you configured email hosting for your domain yet? If you haven't easiest way would be with your web host as chances are it is included with your hosting plan. If they are hosting your DNS as well it is ...


0

It is unlikely that your registrar will be able to do this as most registrars do not include DNS with a domain registration - unless they also do hosting and will likely charge you extra $$ for that. The nameservers for your domain will point somewhere, likely to your hosting company, that is the where you should set up things if you can, assuming they ...


2

GoDaddy has a help document on how to "Move a domain to another GoDaddy account" If you want to move a domain name from one account with us to another — it's called an Account Change. After you complete the following steps, we send the owner of the receiving account an email with instructions to confirm the move. The recipient must confirm ...


3

If you are using Apache then you can simply create an additional VirtualHost for your sub domain and set the webroot to the directory you choose. Example: Your current VirtualHost is most likely something along the lines of the following; with the ServerName your domain and the DocumentRoot being the web root. <VirtualHost 1.2.3.4:80> ...


1

Here's how consumer facing domains were originally meant to work: domain.com didn't serve anything necessarily. mail.domain.com hosted your email server. ftp.domain.com hosted your FTP server. irc.domain.com hosted your Internet Relay Chat server. www.domain.com hosted your World Wide Web server. All of these are subdomains. The World Wide Web was ...


8

According to Judge William A. Fletcher's opinion on Office Depot v. Zuccarini, the jurisdiction over a domain name is dependant on the jurisdiction of the domain name registry. The registry for .com domains is VeriSign, which is headquartered in Virginia, USA. Assuming that the judge's opinion is still applicable, this means the jurisdiction of .com domain ...


0

Unfortunately it is very much a case of first in best dressed when it comes to domain name registrations. It is quite common for companies to set up their entire business model on owning a massive collection of domain names waiting for the day that someone may want to purchase it in which case they can sell it for much higher than it costs to register it. ...


3

My question is, how do I contact the seller (whois information is of some generic company, likely a squatter), Because it likely is a squatter. If not the generic email will be because the owner has privacy enabled and that is the best email you are going to get. If privacy is enabled, it is safe to assume the owner doesn't want to be contacted. ...


1

There are a number of instances where actions taken by ICANN need the support or consultation of the Registrars Stakeholder Group. Without someone from ICANN coming on here and confirming officially the reason for the duplicate records I suspect that it could be similar to a shareholder type of situation where each accredited registrar entry has one vote and ...


2

Underscores in Domain Names While it may be perfectly valid by RFC 2181 (section 11) to have underscores in a domain name, you will not find any domain type i.e TLD, ccTLD or gLTD that supports registering domains with underscores in, you are therefore restricted to hyphens as an separator. The DNS itself places only one restriction on the particular ...


0

What you have done is correct. It can take some time to propagate DNS changes across the internet as you have to wait for the cached records to expire to get the updated records from your authorative name server. If you are unsure if your record's have propagated fully take a look at https://www.whatsmydns.net/, it has 21 search points across the globe as of ...


5

Depends what you do with it. If it's an innocent use that has nothing to do with the family in question, you are probably fine. I'm sure there are people with the given name Trivago out there. They don't get any rights to the Trivago trademark. If someone "took it personally" and tried to sue you, they'd get spanked out of court, possibly with sanctions ...


0

This is just a formatting error. Remove the "@." from your A record and it should work. You will have to wait for the changes to propagate (or flush your DNS cache).


4

There is no current legal claim that can easily be made for a name as property with the exception of proven lineage. For example, Lord McDonald who's family has operated a restaurant for 700 years, threatened to sue McDonalds (the fast food chain) if it did not cease and desist it's persuit of a small restaurant owner in England. In this case, lineage and ...


3

A simpler answer: In the nameserver change process you described, you're telling Godaddy, "Hey when someone types in my site (yoursite.com) send them to these files (hosting account). And when you type in (yoursite.com) in the parked domain field on x10host you're saying, "The traffic coming from here are my visitors." Look at parked domains ...


0

Age of domain is a huge trust factor for a domain. It is important. However, as Simon Hayter alludes to, there is more complication to this than just the domain age. For example, when the domain is transferred and the registration information changes, the domain age no longer matters. The domain age, in effect, actually resets within Google. Why? Simple ...


0

The length of time a domain has been registered, and up and running, does help with SEO but, as the saying goes, content is king and it is your content that will determine your rank going forward. Length of time of the domain name is only a brownie point.


0

Dot.tk gives you 2 options; Redirect your .tk domain to another domain or "Use DNS" which then acts like any other domain name. These options are presented to you when creating the dot.tk domain. If you select "Use DNS" you have 2 options which is to either use the dot.tk DNS service or your own. Using the dot.tk DNS service will give you these options: ...


2

Its not Google who is redirecting it. Its the browser. Everyone knows .COM domains extension is the most important TLD and most browsers like Opera mini, UC browser, etc. has defaulted .COM domains if extension is not provided. Nothing on your part that you can do to change it except perhaps wait for .XYZ extension to get more popular than .COM ...



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