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I cannot tell you what this cloaking is or how it works, however, this type of activity is normally done using a DNS CNAME record pointing your example.com to example.altervista.org. You would likely do this with the registrar for your domain name example.com who should be your statement of authority (SOA) for your domain name. Log on and see where your DNS ...


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If memory serves correctly when you change the CNAME and IP pointer for a domain to a new location, then on the NEW location you need to have/add/write a MX record in the zone file that points back to the previous mail host location if your going to have the previous location continue to handle mail activities. Remember that the A record / CNAME record is ...


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The simple answer is that no, you can't really get a URL that is redirected somewhere else to show up in a Google search result. I'm assuming here that the alias is setup to redirect with a 301 status response code to your full website URL. But, in your case, that is probably a really good thing. There are a couple big reasons for that: 1) Chances are good ...


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I offer 'home made' privacy to my customers. As far as I can tell the only requirement - and I am not sure if it is a 'legal' requirement - is that the email address is legitimate and can be verified. Since I use the businesses address and a generic (domain-privacy@host.tld) email address that I monitor, as far as I am concerned it passes the test for ...


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Whilst .me is officially a cTLD, it is very popular in other parts of the English speaking world for personal/portfolio type sites. As such it is also very well accepted and understood for this purpose. In fact, I'd wager most English speakers associate .me with the first-person singular pronoun, not a country - and this is how it is often marketed "over ...


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Yes. .org generally is for non-profit organisations, so your giving the wrong impression with a URL like that. Is you target audience in Montenegro? if so I would go with that.


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1) Correct. You only really need to add the non-www version. Google treats www and non-www as separate websites. Same goes for http or https (if that is a factor for you). https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/34592?hl=en 2) See the article above for why you'd need a separate website. The main reason, from that article, is that "Search Console data ...


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For Q1: Provided your redirect from www.example.com to example.com forces all requests to be redirected and doesn't just apply to your root folder for example, then you will not need to add www.example.com to your Webmaster Tools as a property. For Q2: This feature of Webmaster Tools is more helpful for setting a preference between SSL and non-SSL versions ...


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If both domains are available, buy both domains and redirect the incorrectly spelled one to the correctly spelled one.


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Instead of selecting forward with mask you need to select forwarding only. Putting it inside a frame is how they mask the domain the site is on.


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There will be no ranking benefit or devaluation based on the domain. But you need to think of the user here. I'm guessing your brand will still include the two Rs, so when a user types your name directly in to the browser they may get a DNS failure or another site thinking it has two Rs. Also think about people that may want to link to you, it would easy ...


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Using whole terms in a domain name can be extremely powerful if done well even though domain name exact match search results rank lower and nearly last in the SERPs. The reason is simple. Semantics. Terms used in a domain name are scored semantically and scored high giving topical weight to the site overall. If a site about cars has a domain name of abc.com ...


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I'd say you should never skip such letters unless that's the actual name of the website/company/product/etc. Going by your example I would understand that papereview.com would be something like paper-e-view - something related to digital viewing of papers. Or Pape-review - a website that reviews Papes (whatever that might be). But you want it to be about ...


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This is determined by a country by country basis and different countries have different laws. In Australia we us ASIC and IPA Australia to look up specific trademarks. All CC TLDs (Country Code Top Level Domains) are governed by auDa - the .au Domain Administration. Australia has very specific compliance for our CC TLDs, including trademark found in ...


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Ok, first, it is not necessary to move your files/database etc. unless you are actually also hosting with your current registrar. Second, the biggest thing often overlooked and contributes to down time during a transfer is whether the new registrar will allow you to setup DNS before the transfer. Many do not but don't admit this openly. For example, ...


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Heroku gives directions on configuring DNS for root and they provide a list of DNS providers who can provide ALIAS/ANAME and other capabilities needed. They say, if your DNS provider will not provide this, then you have to do a redirect (just as I have done): If your DNS provider does not support ALIAS or ANAMEs, you will need to use subdomain ...


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You seem to be doing everything right webmastering wise, but I took a look at your headers using CURL. When I tried just http://morphmarket.com, I got the following: HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently Cache-Control: max-age=900 Content-Length: 0 Content-Type: text/html Location: http://www.morphmarket.com Server: Microsoft-IIS/7.5 X-AspNet-Version: 4.0.30319 ...


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What a great question... Considering your setup I'm not what you can do here. It looks like the delay is on Godaddy's 301 redirect side so I'd be tempted to ask them why there's such a delay. Your A record points to 50.63.202.10, is that a hosting account? If so then I'd be tempted to remove the godaddy redirect and allow the non-www to go to the godaddy ...


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Here's a link to check trademarks in the UK... https://www.gov.uk/search-for-trademark This link allows you to search directly with the UK Intellectual Property Office who are charged with the responsibility of maintaining all requests for trademarking within the UK. If it is not listed on here, it is unlikely to be a registered trademark, at least in the ...


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I'm pretty sure you'll be in trouble for making the difference in the domain name only by one or two characters. On top of that, you're trying to make a similar network which in effect means trying to copy the basic operation of facebook in general. Why not make something brand new that hasn't been on the internet before and use a completely different ...


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According to Wikipedia: Generally open for Iranians and non-Iranians; 3rd-level registrations under subdomains have varied restrictions and are restricted to Iranian-related entities There are no law preventing the registration of foreign TLDs including those assigned to Iran.


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Gandi offers this, and has extensive documentation explaining their API here: http://doc.rpc.gandi.net/domain/ You can programmatically register, manage, and transfer domains with their service. No affiliation with them, except as a happy customer.


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Some hosts/registrars allow you to create NS records. You could then create a record like this: subdomain.domain.tld NS ns3.domain.tld This will delegate the request for the lookup to another nameserver. Naturally, passing that request will require contacting the nameservers of the primary domain, which is probably not something you want. To be honest ...


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While the SEO effect of dashes is debatable, it's still very minimal and wouldn't really affect your SERP visibility. Google never considers 2 different URLs as the same site, they don't look at dashes actually means the dash shouldn't affect your ranking. You'll need to look at everything else instead: your website/pages structure, keywords use, ...


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So I called GoDaddy and in the beggining we try again the first solution: Change your account's primary domain: mydomain What they said is that when a domain is already in used, even by the same host, you can't change the account primary domain. However we have a solution. You just need to remove the domain name from your host and add it again. ...


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To begin, while Google does not take into account special characters in domain names, that is only limited to term weight within the domain name. Having said that, special characters are used to establish word (term) boundaries. This is a programming construct. This means that ab-cd.com would be split into two terms, ab and cd. There is no confusion between ...


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i read a lot about the dashes that it's not good for SEO (Google serp), but it's not the only factor on SEO. Backlinks, user interface, how the site perform (speed, up time, etc), social media, domain age, and on-site SEO all contributing how your site ranked on Google.


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You can't set nameservers and CNAME records. Go to Namecheap.com --> Manage Domains and click on the domain you want to manage. Then, go to All Host Records and change the settings to this.


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I'm answering here with the essence of what @Steve commented to my question, as it addresses the portion of my question asking about prevalence (I accepted a different answer though as it more directly addresses the main question in the title)... I realized that every Domain Registrar Terms of Service I've subsequently read included the type of ...



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