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49

From here It's a little-known fact, but fully-qualified (unambiguous) DNS domain names have a dot at the end. People running DNS servers usually know this (if you miss the trailing dots out, your DNS configuration is unlikely to work) but the general public usually doesn't. A domain name that doesn't have a dot at the end is not fully-qualified ...


40

Hostnames without a trailing dot are potentially ambiguous. A trailing dot means that the hostname is fully qualified and may not be relative to the local search domain. Imagine you are a student of the (fictive) Example University which has the second-level domain example.edu. Inside the university's campus network you can omit the .example.edu suffix for ...


9

From a technical standpoint, it's possible, and there are some examples: http://ai./ http://to./ http://uz./ These are country code TLDs, but the point is that DNS as a technology does support "dotless" domains. However, it appears that most generic TLDs are not allowed to have them due to ICANN polices. According to RFC 7085 such restrictions only ...


5

It is also worth noting that even if you can technically set up a "dotless" domain name (per depquid's answer), it might cost you a pretty penny. ICANN just auctioned off the rights to control a bunch of new top level domains. The cost of owning a top level domain is $185,000. In addition to the money, the process also involved technical requirements for ...


4

I deal with this type of situation using my virtual host configuration. Under Apache, the first virtual host is the "default" virtual host. I configure it to serve a 404 error with the message 404 Not Found -- Hostname Not Recognized This server is not configured to serve documents for foo.example.com Then I create specific virtual hosts for ...


3

A slash at the end of a domain tells the server that the request is for the directory and that it should look for the default file (index.html, index.php) first. It allows for faster loading time by telling the browser to look for the default file. Traditionally, URLs that pointed to files did not include the trailing slash, while URLs that pointed ...


2

We can actually manage the DNS for the record pointing to Tumblr. You can't, however, have our proxy (orange cloud) turned on for the record & it should be grey (direct).


2

There are likely several attributes that your sites share in common that could be used to link them. IP Address -- they will be hosted on the same server. Sites like this one list the host names that point to a particular server. There may also be many sites not owned by you on the same server which may disguise it somewhat. You use the same templates or ...


2

Using 301 permanent redirects from one domain to the other is your better option. In fact, "domain parking" won't achieve what you want at all. Parking a domain generally means that the registrar will put up its own page there. That page will generally say "coming soon" and have advertisements for the registrar's services.


1

Someone (likely a bot) with the user agent [1] tried to access the resource [2] on your server. Your server responded with status code 404, probably because this resource doesn’t exist. A simple GET request like this is no reason to assume that an attack is going on. The bot claims that it’s the bot "DomainOptimaCralwer" from domainoptima.com (this doesn’t ...


1

First thing is how much traffic is at your old site? If old site has really good traffic and strong SEO then you should not take decision to remove old site and launch new quickly. You can redirect user to new site using 301 redirection rule. Second this is that you can simply put alert message like visit our new site : www.yournewsite.com so when user will ...


1

You should never use a CNAME for your root domain name in my opinion so I would go with your 2nd example. A xx.com > 123.456.789 A www.xx.com > xx.com Although it is debatable I would say to answer your question specifically, whilst on the same domain (i.e. subdomains) it would be perfectly fine to use a CNAME however in ...


1

This is from a free site I use a lot Pentest-Tools I felt it would help you more than just doing a WOT search or the whois/alexia/dns lookups. This should be able to answer your question bye running a quick test to see if it shows up as you or not. -Hillary Marek 'Find Subdomains' allows you to discover subdomains of your target domain and increase ...


1

It is possible that reverse DNS would reveal something, but that depends on how Namecheap manages their shared hosting accounts. This could be determined by evaluating two domains on one account. However, if someone is going through the trouble to evaluate the records of two sites, then there is a good chance they are already on to you. Seeing that both ...


1

Setting up DNS to allow any subdomain is known as wildcard subdomains. Allowing any subdomain through this mechanism is fine for SEO as long as they redirect. My domains are all set up this way. Since you say you have a redirect in place that will take users to the canonical www subdomain, there will be no SEO problems. It would be an SEO problem to ...


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Yes, it may affect if the sub-domains point to same content pages. All you need to do is use 301 re-direct and canonical here is the link: When to use canonical? Prepaid products of different values


1

I like to think of the trailing dot as the "real" root of the Internet, and that it lives in Virginia, USA. If you leave out the dot, then some root is always implied. For normal users, it's the same root, and that's the situation I will discuss today. In my perverse way, I actually find the trailing dot quite handy. If I'm checking out someone else's ...


1

To partially answer your question, you can add it to htaccess canonical forwarder rules. In a basic HTTP sense it looks for a period before the URI and works it into whatever anti-duplicate forwarding mechanism you use. Here is an example including a common "addon domain" sub util route: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^domain\.hostdomain\.com(|\.)$ [OR] ...


1

All websites can be accessed with or without a slash on the domain name. All of the following work: www.google.com/ and www.google.com www.khanacademy.org/ and www.khanacademy.org In fact, when the browser requests home pages, it is required to submit the slash in the request, even if the slash is not present on the URL. This is a valid http request ...


1

The big clue in the in the DNS check is this: Mismatched NS records WARNING: One or more of your name servers did not return any of your NS records. The speed of propagation was 100% fine; the settings for DNS resolution are apparently completely wrong. In about 4 to 48 hours all DNS servers around the world received the incorrect DNS settings telling ...


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I tend to register domains for 5 or 10 years at a time for several reasons: You can get a better price. When you register for multiple years you are often offered a discount. I don't have to worry about renewing the domain every year. Taking the yearly hassle off my plate is worth something to me. Long registration periods may be seen as a sign of ...


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Is seem you did not specify yet where the content of myclientsdomain.com is so the default content is served on the server. You have to set up a VirtualHost for myclientsdomain.com. Virtualhost setup should be something like the following: NameVirtualHost *:80 <VirtualHost *:80> ServerAdmin webmaster@dummy-host.example.com DocumentRoot ...



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