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38

ICANN (not the domain registrar) requires that all information in your registration be valid. If any dispute arises (see the ICANN Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy rules here) you will be contacted via the means specified in your domain registration. Notice that section 14 of the rules is a section that defines what happens as part of a ...


25

I really like Namecheap. Transferring is easy. Domain Management is easy. There is no upselling, you buy domain, it's yours, Apply WhoIsGuard if you want stop personal details being revealed if someone does a WhoIs on your domain. Can't testify with regards to customer service though.


18

Gandi comes well recommended. I just moved some of my domains over there, it was a pretty straightforward process.


18

This March 31, 2005 Google patent seems to indicate it might be true: [0039] Consider the example of a document with an inception date of yesterday that is referenced by 10 back links. This document may be scored higher by search engine 125 than a document with an inception date of 10 years ago that is referenced by 100 back links because the rate of ...


17

Bypass the registrar when searching for available domains by querying the registry directly. Buy the domain you want as soon as you know it's available. Use a registrar who doesn't have a history of pinching unregistered names of value when you try to register them. To bypass the registrar when doing searches: From "How To Keep Your Domain Name Searches ...


13

There is definitely the possibility of running into conflict when registering domains in countries other than your own, particularly if those countries have very strict, unstable or conservative governments. For example, read "The .ly domain space to be considered unsafe", an account of how the domain vb.ly, a URL shortener, was taken down by the Libyan ...


12

Typically no, most major registrars will implement NS updates very quickly (minutes, or just a few hours). What remains is the TTL (time to live) value set on records served by your existing name servers that resolve your domain to its IP. The typical cache period is 4 hours, however ISP's are free to ignore that, and continue to serve the old IP sometimes ...


8

What you want is called an "add-on" domain. From http://webnet77.com/webstuff/parked-add-on-domain.html Add-On Domains * You have two domains mysite.com and my-other-site.com. * You want the two domains to be totally separate/independent websites. Your hosting plan should allow for add-on domains, otherwise you won't be able to use your space the ...


8

Unlock the domain via GoDaddy's panel if they happen to be locked. Update all the contact info and email address. It needs to be accurate in case trouble occurs. Get the authorization code or EPP from GoDaddy.com Have your new host initiate the transfer (this will likely cost you a yearly fee at the new place) You will have to supply the new registrar ...


6

Dreamhost is a great hosting company. I've been using them for like 5 years now with out a single complaint.


6

Going through the checkout process at GoDaddy is a horrific experience. This is thankfully not the case with https://www.hover.com/


6

Name.com - I'm hearing many good things from others who have switched to using them.


6

Your registrar may have a grace period (check with them!) but in theory it will be up for grabs. Of course, if you have a trademark that matches the domain name you could probably get it back. But if you are big enough to have a trademark you should be paying a few years in advance and making sure to renew in a timely manner.


6

Google's "Information retrieval based on historical data" patent is about as close to authoritative (i.e. not anecdotal) data as you can get: [0101] Also, or alternatively, the age, or other information, regarding a name server associated with a domain may be used to predict the legitimacy of the domain. A "good" name server may have a mix of ...


6

Personally, I wouldn't insert false data. Whilst you generally should not have problems, it is usually against the rules of the registrar you are using and for some TLD's, it is against the registry's rules. If someone chooses to complain (for any reason) and they have no way to find out who owns the record, and they kick up enough fuss, it is possible that ...


6

Yes, it matters! At most registries it is a breach of their contract to supply incorrect information, and if caught they can cancel your domain name. If the registration is for personal (non-trading) use then some registries (like .uk) offer an opt-out so that personal information is not revealed in the "whois" database. However the registry itself still ...


6

The expiration date should be unaffected. However, many registrars require you to add another year to your registration when you transfer over to their services. But it will never expire sooner than its current expiration date.


6

Verisign maintains a list of .name registrars here. You can filter the list either by country or by domain extension (but not both, sadly).


6

SLaks is correct, Google is not a registrar, but namecheap.com, hover.com and networksolutions.com are all registrars you could look into transferring for domain to. Here is a blog post on how to transfer from godaddy to namecheap.com: blog.jeffepstein.me To setup a Google Apps go to https://www.google.com/a to setup your account. There is a little step by ...


6

No, it doesn't matter. Registrars are only bureaucratic entities that "give" you the name you requested, record your information and associate it with the domain name. Once you have the domain name, you have to host it somewhere, and that physical location is the one that may affect.


6

This is a classic domain registrar scam. Don't buy them. First off, unless you're operating in China/Taiwan/India, those domains are worthless to you. Secondly, you'll be be encouraging more such scams in the future. What I'd do is try to trick the scammer that you are interested in registering those domains, and see if you can get them to buy all of those ...


5

As a practical matter, I like using What's My DNS, an online tool that samples a number of DNS servers across the planet which will give some idea who's got what, where. It's a great way to get a kind of an answer to the question "has my DNS propagated?"


5

This Google Answers page on How to Get a Domain Name from a Squatter has some information that may be helpful. Some of it is supported by knowledgeable individuals while other information is hearsay. Some suggest that you're in for an expensive legal battle, while others assert that if you have a legitimate business reason for wanting the domain and can ...


5

Well, I know this. If you are running a legit business or anything that makes profit, you want to use legit information for all legal reasons. You are going against the registrars rules also by inserting false information. They could deny you services for violating those terms of use. You are legally purchasing a product that belongs to you and you want to ...


5

There are several steps to this process: Find your server IP's I'm assuming you have WHM here? Open http://IP/whm (or the path to your server control panel installation) then go to IP Functions >> show IP address usage & check your primary and secondary IP Address. Make a note of these two IP's Register your Nameservers You need to register your ...


5

Is there a domain registrar that offers an API for purchasing domains? Lots. Pick whoever you like, search for "$registrarName API" and there's a decent chance they do: Godaddy Namecheap Gandi Network Solutions, via SRSPlus You'll have to review their terms and such to see if the access, tools, etc they provide match your particular needs, ...


5

Is there a chance that a UDRP would be successful or should I swallow my pride and simply ask them for how much they would sell it There's always a chance it will work but the more likely end result is going to be litigation and potentially international litigation (neither of which comes cheap). Unless the small company has deep pockets and legal ...


4

With GoDaddy, you need to make sure you have the correct level of service to allow multiple domains to one account. GoDaddy calls the one that can handle multiples a "Deluxe" account. This article explains how to make it work.


4

I would agree with all the above. But depending on the case it might not be necessary to make it so complicated. We had to buy a domain where the owner was in a different country, so the main issue was how to make sure that we get the domain after we paid for it (and the other way round). So we used http://www.sedo.com The seller can park the domain and we ...


4

I have to mention Moniker. They're a top 10 registrar, they're US based (which is nice for Europeans considering that if anyone from the EU wants to screw with one of your domains, they're going to hit a US stonewall, but may not be that great if you're an American trying to protect your online assets), and their claim is never having lost a domain. They're ...



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