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Is it possible to change my DNS records (or otherwise) in such a way that a sub-domain subdomain.example.com will point to example.com/somepage. Not by changing DNS records. A records point to IP addresses. CNAME records point to another host. Neither can point to a URL or URI like: example.com/somepage. However, some DNS providers (like domain ...


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Assuming you have a server running Linux, and you are looking to update a DNS A record with the IP of your home server on DNS hosted by GoDaddy, you could do the following on the home server. Note that it my violate your EULA. Be sure that you follow the rules! Install Python2.7 (it is likely already installed). Place the following file at ...


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It turned out there was an error in the web.config file. By adding: <httpErrors errorMode="Detailed" /> to the <system.webServer> section, I was able to pinpoint the problem and resolve it. Evidently IIS 7.5 ignored the error, while 8.5 did not.


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Use PING. Go in a command prompt I think in windows you go to start, then find then type cmd, but I haven't used windows in a long time. But anyways, once you get a command prompt, you'll see a black box with a grey prompt. Then type in: ping <website url in question> Then press enter. For example, if you typed "ping google.com", you'll see the ...


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You do no need control panel access to view the setup of a domain. You can view MX, DNS, Name Servers settings etc by doing a standard DNS look-up! any good online DNS look-up web application will do this for you. Using MX Tool Box change MX look-up to DNS look-up, and type the domain in the search boxes. Do not enter www. as this is not a part of the ...


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Check if they have the same IP, using the command nslookup or use a web service, like this example. Of course you should consider the redirection subdomains as well.


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This sounds more complicated than needed. Just get your domainB and make that an alias (CNAME) of your current domain, your whole site will now be reachable without any extra work (and no downtime at all). At this point both work, which you dont want to like thís. The moment it works, set you canonical to the domainB, and build the 301-header in your ...


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It is common for webhosts to direct both example.com/cpanel and cpanel.example.com to your cPanel (on port 80 - not secure - better to use cPanel via HTTPS on port 2083). However, it seems they might not have set up the redirection for the subdomain and instead it's simply defaulting to the IP address of your shared server. In which case it is likely ...


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You can use SSL Certifications with Standard DNS since its associated with the server and common name. You can not use a purchased SSL certification on the free service as its not supported, however you can use a self signed cert. Your find all this information on DynDNS SSL cert page. SOURCE Do SSL Certificates work with dynamic IP addresses? ...


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There are two options: Create an A record for example.net with IP address 123.123.123.123. Create a CNAME record pointing www.example.net to example.net Create a CNAME record pointing mail.example.net to example.net Create a MX record pointing to mail.example.net But since I noticed you are using the same IP addresses in your example, if you are ...


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Your domain name registrar should be hosting your DNS records. This is not something you have to do or worry too much about. In fact, you are far better off not running a DNS server because of the security implications. When you register your domain name many registrars will host your DNS records free of charge. Some do charge a small fee. If your registrar ...


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The existing record is not very restrictive (?all allows anyone to send email as your domain). If it is already being fully exploited then you would be better not having SPF at all. But assuming the intention was to only some-ip-address and the MX and hosts within the domain to send mail.... v=spf1 +a +mx +ip4:<some-ip-address> include:spf.mtasv.net ...


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Thought I'd add how I resolved the problem: I didn't quite understand this (Namecheap were, IMO, deliberately evasive on the issue) but you still own a .io domain during the pendingDelete phase, even if it is in the registrar's control! You therefore have the right to transfer the domain from the registrar's control to your own control, which is free. In my ...



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