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Short answer: a registrar can register their own domains just like anyone else. Longer answer: Behind the domain name system is a network of registry operators; in the case of gTLDs (global top level domains - eg. com, net, org and many, many others) the registry operator is ICANN. Each registrar (GoDaddy, Namecheap etc.) is accredited by the registry ...


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No. A DNS (domain name server) record can only associate Internet numbers and domain names in different ways, such as an A (IPv4) record, AAAA (IPv6) record, and MX (mail server, where to send email to). You cannot give instructions through DNS, such as a 301 or 302 Redirect response, which is what I believe you're asking for. You are going to need to use a ...


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For DNS of domain.com add: sub.domain.com. 14400 IN A IP_OF_NEW_SERVER


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The domain name returned from the reverse DNS lookup of the IP address should itself have an A record in its DNS record that points back to the IP address (in order to be "forward-confirmed"). So, in the case of a www subdomain, which is usually just a CNAME record pointing to the main domain, you should probably specify the bare domain. eg. example.com.


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It appeared that the new sever had mail server disabled. Once it was enabled e-mails started going to inbox.


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If you have moved your website to another server then you might need to recreate the webmail ids as last time I did the same i recreated all of my ids and along with that i had to reconfigure all of them to my gmail account using IMAP4 settings. Please try this will surely work.


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First thing to check is that your MX records have been updated to reflect the new server address, then double check in your hosting panel that all your old email addresses gave been recreated on the new server.


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While people expect not having to type the www., most web servers will add it once you connect to them because that is its canonical name. Try it with google; typing google.com into your browser takes you to www.google.com. But try this: configure your web server to accept www.example.com and example.com as acceptable names, with example.com as the ...


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There is no DNS record under the RFC which will forward your connection to the non-www version of your site. The traditional way to do this is to set your web server IP as an A record for your zone apex and then set www as a CNAME record referencing the zone apex of your domain but you specifically say that you do not wan't to do this. In this case the only ...


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If you are using Apache then you can simply create an additional VirtualHost for your sub domain and set the webroot to the directory you choose. Example: Your current VirtualHost is most likely something along the lines of the following; with the ServerName your domain and the DocumentRoot being the web root. <VirtualHost 1.2.3.4:80> ...


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There are a number of instances where actions taken by ICANN need the support or consultation of the Registrars Stakeholder Group. Without someone from ICANN coming on here and confirming officially the reason for the duplicate records I suspect that it could be similar to a shareholder type of situation where each accredited registrar entry has one vote and ...


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Different places in the world and different people just call it different things. Nameserver aka Name Server aka nameserver DNS aka Domain Name Server There is no difference.


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Adding localnets to the acl authorises any connection on the local network which is in the same local subnet as the DNS server. What this means is that not only will your client's IP of 55.55.55.55 be allowed but if we assume a local netblock of 192.168.1.1-255 then any machine with the IP of 192.168.1.* will be allowed to work with the DNS server.


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This is not possible with native email server programs but you could write your own program to do it for you (which would be better suited for http://www.stackoverflow.com). I would be remiss if I didn't also point out that doing it precisely the way you are asking could be a recipe for trouble as you are creating a system whereby someone could send an ...


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What you have done is correct. It can take some time to propagate DNS changes across the internet as you have to wait for the cached records to expire to get the updated records from your authorative name server. If you are unsure if your record's have propagated fully take a look at https://www.whatsmydns.net/, it has 21 search points across the globe as of ...


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Transferring a domain away from a registrar is free of charge; as long as the domain is unlocked and you provide the correct EPP code to the incoming registrar the transfer can commence. The incoming registrar will charge you a transfer fee for the incoming domain transfer but will also extend the registration period of the domain by an additional year. ...


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Figured it out - in have two buckets in S3 - mydomain.com and www.mydomain.com. mydomain.com is where the site is, and I set www.mydomain.com to redirect to mydomain.com.s3-website-ap-southeast1.amazonaws.com... I moved the files to www.mydomain.com and removed the redirect.


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This is just a formatting error. Remove the "@." from your A record and it should work. You will have to wait for the changes to propagate (or flush your DNS cache).


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The reason you see a 301 in your curl is because www.mydomain.com redirects to mydomain.com from the S3 endpoint for www.mydomain.com. This is a common configuration when using S3 for your static website. The question is how do you have mydomain.com configured in your DNS zone at Namecheap? If the browser is displaying the S3 url I can only assume that the ...


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A simpler answer: In the nameserver change process you described, you're telling Godaddy, "Hey when someone types in my site (yoursite.com) send them to these files (hosting account). And when you type in (yoursite.com) in the parked domain field on x10host you're saying, "The traffic coming from here are my visitors." Look at parked domains ...



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