Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

The simple answer is, the web server software looks at the hostname in the HTTP request and uses that to determine which website to serve. For example, Apache has the NameVirtualHost configuration option which controls this behaviour. You can find a detailed explanation of how this process works in its documentation: ...


5

Well its not your site, its China's internet service layout, which has to jump through hoops to get even get to US DNS Servers. Furthermore, I don't know how 'free' the Internet surfing is there, meaning if it's being monitored by the government, which would undoubtedly further slow its response times. Many factors can be attributed to your site being slow ...


4

Web client, usually a browser, opens a TCP socket to the server. The server software accepts the connection without knowing the specific site requested, and waits for an HTTP request to happen. The client sends the request, mainly composed of HTTP headers. One of these headers is the Host: example.com header, at this point the server is aware of the right ...


3

A CNAME is a type of DNS record, where a hostname points at another hostname. An A record is another type of DNS record, where a hostname points at an IP address. A subdomain is what you described as 'the left side of the domain', e.g. webmasters.stackexchange.com is a subdomain of stackexchange.com. The DNS setup for a subdomain could use either an A ...


2

It appears that you did not get an answer because the DNS server your client computer is pointed to is not the authority. The require authority flag (if I remember the name right) is likely set and the request not completed because the DNS you queried was not the authority. This can be common if you are pointed to a Bind instance. By default, recursive ...


1

Your situation is an odd one and your question more than intriguing. I imagine that this question can be helpful because this would be a really confusing situation to anyone. I do this everyday and it eluded me even though there were hints right in the question that were easy to overlook. When you use nslookup or whois, it is possible that the data returned ...


1

Baidu spider also does not properly obey robots.txt in some cases. They seem to have a history of doing things their own (wrong) way. Unless you have a Chinese website that gets a significant amount of traffic from the Baidu search engine, why would you keep old server up just to make the Baidu spider happy?


1

I think that you are using private name servers. To use private name servers you need to register private name servers through your domain control panel. There may be an option in your domain control panel to create name servers in which you will have to define the ip of your vps against NS1 & NS2.YourDomain.Com


1

The easiest way is to modify your hosts file to hardcode the domain name to the new IP address temporarily. See this guide for OS-specific instructions. Don't forget to remove the entry again after you're done testing. Alternatively, you could setup a temporary test subdomain for each site on the new server (test.example.com), set it up as an alias, and use ...


1

The first thing you want to do, is reduce the TTL (Time to Live) on your DNS records to be as small as acceptable. This will keep cached DNS servers from holding onto stale data for too long when you switch. Next, I assume your web site is going to be moving to a new IP address. There is no reason switching the site to a new host IP address has to happen at ...


1

No, generally you wouldn't want the IP address to resolve to your website in addition to the domain itself (providing your domain resolves to the website, this will suffice) - there is often no need for the website to be accessible at the IP address but you could 301 redirect the IP address to your domain in .htaccess to handle this if you wish.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible