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19

Don't forget that while the monitor might be larger than 800x600 the browser window might not be full screen. For example I'm running on LCD monitors with 1600x1200 resolution (still quite large) but my browser window is 1100x1200 (approximately). So you need to look at the most common browser resolution, not the most common screen resolution.


16

According to W3Counter 800 x 600 accounts for approximately 2.56% of users' browser resolution: 1 1024x768 23.72% 2 1280x800 18.42% 3 1280x1024 10.21% 4 1440x900 8.18% 5 1366x768 6.82% 6 1680x1050 5.19% 7 800x600 2.56% 8 1920x1080 2.37% 9 1152x864 2.11% 10 1024x1024 2.06% Since that number is lower then IE6's ...


16

My process generally looks a bit like this: 1. Features. With pencil and paper, lay out the distinct features / pages that will comprise the site. This gets at the broad stroke questions - are you building a simple info and graphic site for your mom? an ecommerce solution for a small business? a blog / gallery for a photographer friend? Your answer will ...


12

Don't forget more and more people are using Smart Phones (and sometimes even not so smart phones) to view sites. Netbooks are also proliferating. Designing your site to look good for users with lower resolution is in some ways more important now than it has ever been.


11

The real answer is to use whatever suits your site best. Some facts: Keywords in the URL aid SEO and give users an idea of what the page is about. This is true for both static and dynamic URLs. The consensus is that a lowercase slug, separated by dashes, is the best. Search engines index dynamic URIs (e.g. index.php?page=about) just fine. Using ID numbers ...


10

I would view the services that they provide, which my website doesn't. I would view my website's performance in comparison to them. I would view How user friendly their website is. I would view the traffic that they fetch and analyze the reason behind it. I would also view the SEO techniques they use to fetch the traffic. Then try to improve my site to ...


8

There are a number of sites out there for folks to get a sense of what's going on in the design arena. Here are some on my RSS feed: Design Reviver - http://designreviver.com/ Six Revisions - http://sixrevisions.com/ A List Apart - http://www.alistapart.com/articles/ Smashing Magazine - http://www.smashingmagazine.com/ WebAppers - http://www.webappers.com/ ...


7

Set Goals - What is the purpose of the website? What will it try to accomplish? How will it contribute to your cause, bottom line, ego? Site Outline - What content will go on your site? How will it be organized? What will it do? Determine the major sections of the website and break your content down by which section it will be placed in. ...


7

Pretty much all of Yahoo's Best Practices can be implemented without even touching the site design in any way. Minimize HTTP requests by combining all CSS into one file and all JS into one file. Use Gzip. Set good Expires headers. These rules could affect the design: Reduce the Number of DOM Elements - worth looking at, you should be able to reduce the ...


7

Gzip is probably the most drastic thing you can do. Making sure all you're css and js files are minimized helps. check that you are not loading js libraries or css that you do not need. Most users will cache these so after the first page it's not all that imprortant. Other than that make sure caching is working properly, like not re-parsing a page for ...


7

You could try Tin Eye You either upload your file or give it an address and it: ... finds out where an image came from, how it is being used, if modified versions of the image exist, or if there is a higher resolution version. Source


6

I would say "style guide."


5

I've developed a relationship with a dozen or so freelance designers. Most of them are quite happy to slice a PSD layout into (X)HTML conforming to the standard of my choice. Most also happily convert it into a Wordpress, Drupal , Joomla , etc theme with very little turn-around time. I'd head to odesk, freelancer.com, etc and put a few projects out for bid. ...


5

Neither: http://example.com/good-uri-design or at least: http://example.com/articles/good-uri-design Good slugs are not necessarily the same as the title, they should be concise and use URL friendly characters.


5

Photoshop is primarily used for designing the graphical template. The technique commonly used is to design in Photoshop exactly what you want the front page to look like. Then, you can make slices or just copy / paste parts (E.g. the header or banner) and use them in the background of the respective element. If you want to learn some cool techniques to ...


5

Scan or license a copy of an image of crumpled white paper In your graphics editing software, copy only the shadows of black from the image (in Photoshop I use the Select > Color Range feature with the darkest shade selected and medium fuzziness) Apply a threshold to the selection to ensure that only dark colors will be copied Paste the shades of black onto ...


5

When designing a website I start by asking why? The first part of my workflow is asking WHY? If I'm working with a client I need to make sure they have a clear defined vision of what they want the website to accomplish. 1. The Why Questions. Tell me a bit about yourself and why you are doing this. Who are the customers? What’s their specific need / ...


4

This advice, from Jakob Neilsen, was written back in 1999 but still seems pertinent today: The URL will continue to be part of the Web user interface for several more years, so a usable site requires: a domain name that is easy to remember and easy to spell short URLs easy-to-type URLs URLs that visualize the site structure URLs that ...


4

These resources might help: 11 Best Practices for URLs How to make URLs user-friendly


4

For web graphics, fireworks takes the cake, in my opinion. Very streamlined and easy to use and is geared towards making shapes and doing fonts and the tasks that you need for making websites. It is definitely not a photo editor.


4

For UI, I recommend using Fireworks over Photoshop. Photoshop is great for creative and complex artwork (print or web), but in my opinion an overly complex tool for web related UI. Fireworks is specifically designed as a web-orientated authoring tool where Photoshop is not. The tool-set for Fireworks is geared towards building web UI, not the complex ...


4

The information that is below the thumbnail (giving details about the image) is usually just code that is written for each individual thumbnail. You can use LightBox 2 and jQuery to show an image of the thumbnail in front of all of a pages content. It is known as a 'LightBox', you will find many sites that use different variants of this. Almost every one ...


4

This is a bit tricky to answer. There are obviously some big differences between displaying your page offline to online (in your test server). All URL paths (root-relative, absolute and even relative) are going to be different depending on your setup. Content-Type headers (normally sent from the server) could differ, so files are interpreted differently, ...


4

Technically, you can get sued (at least in the United States). The logo images are owned by social networks. They have copyright on them. You have to have a licence for to use them at all. (Generally, the sites give a licence to use them for social sharing buttons when unaltered.) They generally have policies against modifying the logo images in any way: ...


3

I use Paint.Net when I need something quick and dirty. It supports layers and a few other things that make it far better than plain old Paint. It is free and easy to use.


3

One resolution that may be pretty common, but is often forgotten, is 1024x600. It's used by many netbooks. Together with window title, menu and task bar, this leaves just about 500 px. So I wouldn't completely disregard the vertical space...


3

The URL for accessing the widget should be the same for everyone. The control of what to show or what capabilities the user has is dependent on the userid, which could be kept, for example, in a session variable. So when widget/12 loads, your web page should check who the user id is in the session variable, see what their permissions are, and then you ...


3

I follow your logic in determining product versus service. However, I see this industry as one which provides "professional services" (a term used by accountants, economists, bankers, etc.), as opposed to selling products. You may product-ize your services by assigning them names, features, and fixed prices, but really, it's still a service. In a chart of ...


3

"1. Am I off base or am I approaching this correctly?" I'd suggest that you're off base. Your current process: Make a huge feature list that results in a complex site build. Find someone to build everything as cheaply as possible. A better process would be this: Set a budget based on what you can afford to pay. Ask several developers what features ...


3

Yes, this is the specific type of thing that they are trying to disallow with the policy. Consider that this link is part of their strategy to virally spread the plugin across the web. They're providing this service for your website, for free, and one of the tradeoffs of this is that you link back to them. It's more forgivable to try change the colours or ...



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