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12

Two examples probably isn't enough to call it "established practice", but it's two big examples at least: Both Google and Twitter use none. Or, if you want to see it this way, their modifier key for navigation is G. To go to your Twitter "favorites" page, you hit G, then F. To go to your gmail drafts folder, hit G then D. Non-navigation shortcuts also use ...


10

You're not going to get fonts, and some other things, to render identically across browsers. The handling of fonts is a perfect example. I know Safari on Windows likes to make text bold for some reason. Unfortunately this is how the web works. The variety of browsers, OSes, monitors, graphic processors, etc, out there means there's potentially thousands or ...


10

A browser recommendation is usually a Do Not Enter sign. Unless you have an extremely popular service with unique features, it is extremely unlikely that people will change browsers for you. Therefore they are highly likely to simply leave. This does not mean you have to write code that works perfectly for every browser. In a support page somewhere you can ...


7

There's no 'best' or universal key modifier choice Your best options are to: Use no modifier key (single keypresses only), then stop detecting keypresses when the user's cursor is in an input field or textarea, like Google does with Gmail shortcuts. -- or -- Pick a default that suits the majority of your visitors based on the operating system statistics ...


6

You can use a website like browsershots, Browsera, Cross Browser Testing, Multi-Browser Viewer, BrowserSeal, and Multi Browser vmWare Appliance You shouldn't need to be checking that many browsers, however. With the exception of Internet Explorer which seems to make radical changes with every release, most of the modern browser only make incremental changes ...


6

For a long time, I only tested on Chrome/Firefox/Safari/IE/Opera on Windows, but about 2 years ago, I ran into a problem where the client was complaining about a screwed up layout on their Mac. I looked at the site in Adobe Browser Lab using OS X Safari and indeed it was rendering improperly compared to Safari for Windows. Ever since then, I've stopped ...


5

Depends on your demographics. Take these 2 sites I operate for example, both with HIGH traffic. Site 1 - blog regarding coding, PDO & databases. Demographic - tech forward, early adopters. IE use TOTAL - 8.7%. ie6 use - negligible. Site 2 - retail site in a mature community with an average customer age of 46. IE use TOTAL - 52% ie6 use - 4.8% ...


5

What you want are IE Conditional Comments: <!--[if lte IE 7]> <link rel="stylesheet" href="ie7-or-less.css" type="text/css" /> <![endif]-->


5

You could use a virtual machine, like Virtualbox, VMware, etc. but you would need to have a license of Mac OS to test it with. Safari, however, should look the same on all operating systems it runs on (in theory), and that seems like a pretty big flaw, so I would assume that the problem is somewhere else.


5

An escalator can never break, it can only become stairs. -Mitch Hedberg You should take a look at the concept of progressive enhancement: Progressive enhancement uses web technologies in a layered fashion that allows everyone to access the basic content and functionality of a web page, using any browser or Internet connection, while also providing ...


5

The Can I Use? website is excellent to determine browser support for various features, including HTML5 semantic tags: http://caniuse.com/html5semantic You'll see that IE8 and below let the team down. If you need to support IE6, 7, and 8, then using the HTML5 shiv is a good idea. IE8 is still in use by roughly 7% of visitors, according to StatCounter, but ...


4

You can use conditional comments to fix issues with Internet Explorer. Aside from that, you shouldn't ever need to target Firefox/Chrome/Opera separately from each other, they all support the standards. Caching shouldn't enter into it; you should be serving the same code for all browsers.


4

IE lags behind in support for CSS3 (CSS3 Transitions, text-shadow, CSS3 Gradients, border-image, columns) IE lags behind in support for SVG (SVG Filters) Doesn't support Web Workers Doesn't support drag-and-drop Doesn't support SVG animations Doesn't support the File API Doesn't support Geolocation (I think) Doesn't support HTML5 Forms WebGL MathML None ...


4

See Quirksmode.com's Compatibility Master Table (and related comparison tables) for examples of IE9's "quirky" interpretations of X/HTML and CSS.


4

It really depends on your intended audience. But cutting out IE entirely is a massive market share! A commercial website should at least support IE8 (in some form) and later and degrade gracefully in older browsers. With progressive enhancement you should be able to support a fair range of browsers to some extent. For e-commerce sites where you are getting ...


3

Ideally you will design the website in such a way that you should only need to write a mobile stylesheet to make your site mobile friendly. In fact I'm fairly certain that's what this website does. This should require no additional programming, only a new stylesheet that either overrides (aka cascades) the main stylesheet with any rule changes, or a fresh ...


3

For browser that are considered "current" (most recent release of a browser that is still actively supported), we try to ensure that our sites always work. We do not, however, test in browsers that have less than 10% of our traffic (in practice this means testing in latest versions of IE, Firefox and Chrome, we've recently also started testing in Safari on ...


3

Well, I would test all major browsers and their older version (IE7, IE8, etc.) and I would note those that don't seem to best render your website. Then, I will simply write a piece of code that would only show browser recommendation for those that fall in the category of browser that don't render the pages appropriatly. I also believe that suggesting to ...


3

What platforms you test on should be based on your demographic not on other webmasters' preferences or subjective opinions. If your target audience lives in a country that still has widespread IE6 usage, or the client has specifically asked for IE6 support, then you'll need to support IE6. But for many sites out there, explicit support for IE6 is no longer ...


3

With simple text, you can not guarantee font rendering to be pixel perfect. If you are worried about how the text looks for some users due to rendering artifacts, it should be up to the user at that point to fix their own system. Of course, since we can't rely on them to even know how to do that, let alone bother doing it, if you still wish to ensure pixel ...


3

This - http://tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/international/bylanguage/ipachart.html - might be of help. If you use the code in HTML it should render properly on the front end.


3

A number of things need to be in place for this to work properly. First of all your page needs to say which text encoding it is using. You need this at the top if you haven't already: <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> The website user then needs to have a font installed which can display that character. You have ...


3

No, Segoe UI does not come bundled with Firefox. Segoe UI is the default for interface elements for Windows starting with Windows Vista and Microsoft Office 2007. So, Segoe UI and other Segoe variants can be obtained by installing Office 2007 or later, or Windows Vista or later. More information can be found here: ...


3

The named character references added in HTML5 do not work cross-browser, though the support is relatively widespread now. Generally, there is hardly ever any reason to use them (as opposite to references defined in HTML 4.1, which are well supported). Quite independently of this, the characters themselves (no matter whether entered as such, as named ...


2

The best, easiest way is to use a library. Libraries like OOCSS, Blueprint, or 960gs are already engineered to replicate their display across the major browsers. All you're left with after that, most of the time, is your making sure your custom styles are cross-browser compliant and that your markup doesn't produce any problems. Avoid hacks like the plague ...


2

Changing the submit button from type submit to type button will prevent the form from being submitted. http://jsfiddle.net/tfcuA/ If you click a submit button you'll need to "jam" the default submission behaviour by returning false or using jQuery's preventDefault. Otherwise have you Captcha handling code trigger from onsubmit on the form.


2

you can use a tool to convert your external style to inline stylesheets, such as used for email-marketing and other areas where inlinestyling is the only option http://inlinestyler.torchboxapps.com/styler/


2

I have experienced subtle differences (not just font related) between Firefox on Windows and Firefox on Mac as well as differences on Safari between Windows and Mac as well. I once had a two column layout look fine on win FF but on mac FF the second column appeared below the first. I had to decrease the width or margin/padding on it to make it align ...



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