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18

The US is a member of the Berne Convention which means users have the Copyright for their work and even have it without notice on the work itself (although I would recommend using it). (For a full list of countries who this also applies to see the list of other members. You automatically have the copyright to any work you create. There isn't an official ...


13

It depends on how the theme was licensed when it was purchased. If you look at the original theme files there will likely be a license file with more information - if not, check the theme webpage that it was purchased from. Odds are you can remove it, but always check the license first. When in doubt, contact the theme author directly.


12

As with all legal questions, ask a lawyer. However, as far as I understand the issue (which may not be very far) any creative work is subject to copyright. This would include such items as CSS styles sheets if your are copying them verbatim (even if modifying them somewhat or replacing parts of them). CSS is in this aspect no different than source code for ...


10

I say you cannot copyright a chunk of code All code (and this includes CSS) is copyrighted as it's a creative work, and all creative works are automatically copyright. Even these words I'm typing now are copyright, but by using this site I'm agreeing to these terms by which I give up some of my rights to them. However, they are still my words. If you ...


10

The date is supposed to be when it was published. So if content is ongoing then it could be a range or it could be the date of the most recent revision. If the site has had no changes then it should be the earliest date. Some people prefer it to be recent to look fresh, others prefer to make it as long ago as possible to show they got there first. ...


10

It doesn't have any SEO impact, but for human beings looking at your site it might seem like it hasn't been updated for a while (unless there's other stuff like dated news items/blog posts on the front page). That's going to make them wonder if what they read is up to date.


10

No, you can't. Property details and photographs are copyrighted, and no one other than the creator can use them without permission. If you just want to use factual data -- asking price, number of bedrooms, etc. -- then it's more of a grey area, and you might be able to get away with it.


9

I'm not a lawyer. This answer should not be considered a substitute for legal advice. Google has updated their algorithms so that spam links hurt their site instead of helping it. Now their site has probably lost a lot of it's former ranking, so their trying to remove those links to get their ranking back up. I don't think you should worry about getting a ...


8

You can consider notifying about your site updates on social media (Twitter, Facebook etc.) as soon as you post. The timestamp recorded there can be a fair indicator that you wrote first. Assuming, popular search engines already index your web-pages regularly (use the site operator, site:example.com, to find out) the date in the cached copy can be used as a ...


7

As always, your best and most definitive course of action is to seek actual legal counsel with experience in copyright law. I'm not a lawyer and, as such, the following should be viewed only as my opinion and not legal advice. The key phrase in the PDF that MrChrister linked to is: if the parties expressly agree in a written instrument signed by them ...


7

You can't really copyright a design, though you can protect things like trade dress, logos, etc. Right now I'm hearing that you're "planning" a project that in your opinion is light years ahead of the competition, but the reality is that no one else has been given the change to decide whether or not this is true yet. I'd suggest you develop your product and ...


7

It makes no difference for SEO. I've had my hand in over 150 websites and none of them have seen negative or positive SEO effects of having an old or new copyright. The date of the copyright has nothing to do with the relevancy of the page content. This is a classic example of clients putting their noses someplace it doesn't belong.


7

It's very simple how it works: Google sees 2 or more sites with the same content. It's not gonna show you all of them, because it's not really a good resultpage if everything is the same. So it starts to decide which of the sites will be shown. It does this based on a few factors like: - Which site had it first (on same publish date, this is THE FIRST ...


6

I would use your own name. A website is not an individual or a legal organisation, even though it may be created by, or represent either of those.


6

as said by @toomanyairmiles I think its mainly content that drives SEO, however if you look at most top SEO sites, they have SEO in the name somewhere. I believe keywords in domains are becoming less and less important though. One thing you may wish to consider is if your telling someone about your website... sntsh.com is a touch clunky when trying to ...


5

It depends on the terms and conditions of the website whose work you are reproducing. The published works of others is copyrighted so you cannot reproduce it without their explicit permission which may be given in their terms of service. You should definitely contact them to ask them for permission before doing it. FYI, Google is cracking down on copied ...


5

To register your website as legally copyrighted, assuming you are in the United States, you would visit the U.S. Copyright Office. From there, you could use their Electronic Copyright Office (eCO) to register your copyright. Their site also has a list of fees for performing this service. Please note- you do not have to register your copyright to have ...


5

You can do at least five things to reduce the risk of copyright infringement harming your business: Upon upload, remind the user not to share copyrighted material. YouTube does this with an 'I own this video or have written permission to share it' checkbox that has to be ticked before the video can be uploaded. Add two clauses to your terms: one that ...


5

Assume that you can't reuse content unless told otherwise. Unless the page specifically states that the content is licensed for reuse under a Creative Commons licence or similar, or the work is in the public domain, you should assume that content is not licensed for reuse, and not reuse it in any way. You can find content that is licensed for reuse with ...


5

Although I'm not an attorney, as a web developer who also deals a bit with clients who have various IP needs, short of hiring counsel (which usually is impactical) there are a few actions which should be fairly effective. Step one is to do a WHOIS lookup on the website owner and get in touch with the abuse department of the hosting company ASAP. Provide ...


5

What you really want for that is more likely a trademark or servicemark. Copyright protects the content of a given work and a URL/site name is too short to copyright. (http://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/faq-protect.html#title explains that you cannot copyright names, titles, and slogans). You can start here (assuming you are in the USA by your ...


5

I think it can. Everything created is protected by copyright, even if not claimed through a visible line of text. In your case, I should try and contact the rightful owner of the other website to ask for permission. Make sure you have this literally written down by the opposite webmaster for future reference.


5

Copyright statement ©YourWebsiteName [Year Started] - [Current Year] All Rights Reserved e.g. © Chatham Archive 1993 - 2012 All Rights Reserved. This is a basic disclaimer and realistically offers you no protection whatsoever, beyond the ability to say that users should have been aware who the content belonged to in a legal case or take down ...


5

It shouldn't create an SEO problem for you it's the content that creates the ranking, not the domain name. So far as copyright and legal problems go, so long as you don't steal content from other similarly named sites there won't be a problem - you name is santosh and you have as much right to use that domain as anyone else.


5

Sorry, but that is not possible. They are plain text files, so no way to hide their content. As far as scripts, you can obfuscate the JavaScript, but it just makes it harder (but not impossible) for humans to read. As mentioned in a comment in that link, "The only way to truly keep something secret is to not send it to the client."


5

It is illegal to copy someone else's written work without their permission. You should also check the terms and conditions of the social network in question as well, because they may also have clauses where they retain some rights of what users post. Furthermore, search engines typically frown upon content that is copied straight from other pages and rank ...


5

Let me give you practical answer. If yours is heavy backlink profile from high worth sites then chances of Panda penalty will be much less than if you hadn't. Secondly if you're copying articles "as is" then it is adding to internet spam. Everyone wastes time and energy on such sites. Google abhors such sites. These ways you can help reduce web spam: So ...



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