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27

There's another factor at play with Quantcast undercounting: They use third-party cookies (cookies served from the .quantserve.com domain), whereas Google Analytics uses first-party cookies (stackexchange.com, etc.) This is pretty crucial, as some browsers (particularly Safari, but more recently Firefox and Chrome) disable third-party cookies as the default ...


18

When things like YSlow and Page Speed tell you to set up cookie-less domains, what they actually mean is serve media from a domain where you won't be setting any, or have not set any (globally) in the past. Sometimes this can be accomplished by using sub-domains, such as media.domain.com, or static.domain.com, however if you set a cookie on domain.com that ...


14

Quantcast emailed me: You mentioned that there was a fairly substantial delta between your GA numbers and your QC numbers. While this doesn’t happen often, it does happen and there are several reasons this can occur. For instance, we account for 3rd party cookies and auto-refreshes and GA does not. We also ask that publishers to place our tag near the ...


10

The short answer is that no-one knows yet. The long answer is that 3rd party cookies are a hazy area; it's not clear from the directive (PDF) who would be prosecuted for failing to obtain consent when storing 3rd party cookies. The ICO's current interpretation and advice, published in "Changes to the rules on using cookies...", admits that they don't know ...


10

The "excitement" relates to confusion about how the new directive (PDF: 2009/136/EC) should be interpreted and implemented, and whether or not it's fair to European webmasters: Do the laws apply to third party cookies? The UK data protection body in charge of enforcing the laws in Britain says in their guidelines that they're seeking clarification (see my ...


10

The UK Information commisioner says in their guidance document on cookies: "An organisation based in the UK is likely to be subject to the requirements of the Regulations even if their website is technically hosted overseas." So it depends on where you are based, not where you are hosted.


9

Quora has a good answer for this: I imagine it's quite difficult to develop a study without significant biases. But here's one (A study of Internet users' cookie and javascript settings) that found in a sample of 13,500 visitors to their website 10% seemed to have 3rd party cookies turned off with only 3.7% disabling all cookies. They also ...


8

My recommendation is that for relatively simple sites, one "static content" domain should be sufficient. DNS lookups should be cached, so only affect the first contact with that server, but it should still be kept to a minimum. You can place all of your Javascript, CSS and static images on there to reduce the overhead of cookie processing and to provide the ...


7

The ratio of cookies to unique visitors is usually between 1.3 and 1.7 for sites with over a million visits. While yc01 is correct that GA uses first-party cookies vs third-party cookies, we at RealSelf.com use two first-party analytics providers (GA and Comscore Direct) and GA still shows 30% more Absolute Unique Visitors than Comscore's Unique Visitors. ...


6

How do I specify that I don't want to use cookies? It's not about what you need to do to have a cookieless domain - it's more about what you need to not do... To have a cookieless domain you have to make sure your application running on that domain doesn't set any cookies. This usually means not having logins, not having google analytics, not having ...


6

No one will actually be able to answer this until there is a test case in front of a court, then there is a separate question of how enforcement will work. I would suspect that the likely outcome of any case will be that any website hosted on a European domain name or server will be covered by the law, and this will be enforced by the registries. Equally ...


4

You could read the values of the cookies into ENV variables, unset the headers using mod_headers RequestHeader directives, and then set the headers again. Update: Solution for reading cookie values into ENV vars and then manipulating headers to control Set-Cookie header order. <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> RewriteEngine on # Read cookie1 into ...


4

Like this (with the new GA code) _gaq.push( ['_setAccount', 'UA-xxxxx-x'], ['_setDomainName', 'www.example.com'], ['_trackPageview'] ); It still won't block other 3rd party apps you may be using from setting cookies to your static subdomain but at least you are getting rid of the GA cookies which are quite large.


4

Most complaints I've seen fall outside of the exceptions you've mentioned and more into the realm of marketing/data. Some of the big issues I see are: Standard analytics (Google Analytics and others) Additional testing (A/B testing etc for usability/conversion rate optimization) Affiliate tracking. Re-marketing there are many programs now that drop a ...


4

Here's a recent (May 4, 2011 -- yesterday when I write this) study from MediaMind with "Cookie Inflation Multipliers" for different markets: press release report (requires filling out a form and giving them your e-mail address) direct link to the report (because it's not unique for the e-mail address) write up by eMarketer Their calculated inflation ...


4

I'm not sure I completely understand this question, but I will attempt to explain how cookies work in the context of Quantcast and hopefully that will explain things When you include a Quantcast cookie into your site, you're actually including a small piece of Javascript that reads and writes that cookie. When a visitor gets to your page and the Javascript ...


4

Before writing the plug-in for Wolf Software we actually contacted the ICO to check the position, and from that consultation we are of the understanding that GA should be considered to be non-essential and as such consent is required. The issue about it being 1st or 3rd is moot as it is only the 'non-essential' part that makes it covered by the law. We ...


4

You can't share cookies across domains. You may share across subdomains. So, if your domain wrote the cookie stored on the client - whether in an iframe from other site or stored by visiting your main site, your domain should be able to access it. Otherwise - no. Here's some good info on the matter (over on SO)...


4

Most bots don't accept cookies (including Googlebot), however, some bots do. You send a Set-Cookie header in the response, but the bot does not send back a Cookie header in subsequent requests - so the cookie is effectively lost. Whether Google is monitoring whether the site is setting cookies, we don't know for sure, but I'd wager they probably are. ...


3

I do not really know how they do it exactly, but I know a method of how it can be done. HTML5 has this option build in. It is done by local storage. Check out this link: http://diveintohtml5.org/storage.html But maybe there are other methods, maybe by javascript which could be compatible with more browsers.


3

I am assuming you are talking about SEO for image search. It's not the domain that matters, per sé, although as with web document SEO (e.g. web pages, PDFs, etc) the domain is most likely a ranking factor. The image can be on any domain you want. It's relevance for any given search term will be determined by multiple factors which includes, domain name, ...


3

You can not do this. Any cookie issue for domain example.com is valid for all subdomains of example.com. If you wish to have static.example.com be a cookie free domain, you should serve up the main site at www.example.com (you can provide a 301 redirect from example.com to www.example.com). As static.example.com is not a subdomain of www.example.com ...


3

The LinkedIn Share Button is available with or without count mode. If you select the no count mode and you host the button image on your server, there's no way for LinkedIn to track user sessions or get other user information from your website. Otherwise (if you want to be paranoid), LinkedIn might actually know when a user requests a page on your site and ...


3

This is SEO friendly and won't cause you any problems with the search engines. Lots of websites don't have their root web directory as their home page. By doing the 301 redirect you are making it clear that http://example.com/nicy is your homepage and any links pointing to http://example.com/ should be associated with http://example.com/nicy (although with a ...


3

In the requests towards the (non-SPDY) website I work for i've seen requests with up to 4-5 KiB of request headers. (we kicked the offending javascript that caused that) Assuming the SPDY compression does at least a compression to leave at most 25% of a header (note that I have NOT tested SPDY yet!!!) then the resulting request header goes down to a size ...


2

I can think of one edge case where the benefits of multi-host requests outweighs the DNS setup costs. When serving map tiles from a Google Maps-style slippy map, you can see benefits from distributing your tile locations virtually across a much larger number of hosts, even if they are all pointing at the same underlying resources (images). In these ...


2

You should consider using sessions to handle this sort of scenario. Sessions generally work by generating a unique GUID for the user's authentication and saving it in a cookie on the user's local machine or passing it around, from page to page, through the URL. This session GUID points to a file or database entry on the server that can then be read and ...


2

My gut says no. Servers only send gzipped content when they receive the correct Accept-Encoding header from the browser. The header itself is not part of the cookie sent by the browser and so you will not be able to modify it. Servers do this to prevent sending a compressed file to a browser that doesn't support it and thus preventing the page from ...


2

I have now had a response from the ICO although it is not entirely relevant any more given that the introduction has been pushed back and the law and guidance maybe refined in the mean time. Thank you for your correspondence regarding the new Privacy and Electronics Communications Regulations. I would begin by pointing out that I will not be ...


2

Maybe your GA visitor numbers are more inflated than a normal site because of the more technical nature of it's audience? For example, programmers, web developers especially, are more likely to be using a range of browsers and thus increasing the cookie count. For question 1, I guess that, as with many metrics, it's better to use data from your own site ...



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