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14

90% or more of Americans have images on, JavaScript enabled, CSS support, and a reasonable connection. Spending 90% of your time chasing the 10% of the world that has gone out of their way to not experience the modern web is a waste of time.


12

Add Google Analytics to your site and track your users The only way to find out is to collect a reasonable sample of statistics about your user base. Anything short of that is just a baseless assumption. Fortunately, Google Analytics tracks absolutely everything about the browser, screen size, enabled capabilities, etc... Target Internet Explorer as the ...


12

Assume: JavaScript will be turned off CSS3 will not be supported Images will be disabled The users connection will be slow I know that's not what you want to hear but as web designers and developers this is the reality we face. Not only will there be users using older browsers but some of them will alter the settings on their browser to change its ...


8

Those two final statements are big assumptions. For example, we have a web app that uses AJAX to its literal meaning - we use it for loading XML documents on the fly. If the XML document does not have the correct content-encoding header (or is lacking one at all), then any unicode characters (smartquotes, long dashes, even some special whitespace and the ...


8

Do the latest version, and a quick check with the previous if you really want. There's a post someone did a few months back with graphs showing what happens to various browsers' versions once a new one comes out. It was primarily about Chrome, because of its automatic updating, but he also saw that since 4 Firefox has been doing basically the same thing: as ...


6

Make sure that at the very least your home page works fine on every environment you can reasonably support. If specific pages require technologies not widely supported, state it clearly in the links that lead to them (don't need to use anything obnoxious, title and alt texts on links and images might suffice) and in the pages themselves (for instance, adding ...


5

Testing with browser modes that IE8 & IE9 provide is not the same as testing compatibility in lower versions of the actual browser. It is just an emulation. Even Microsoft wants to kill IE6. In several countries around the world, IE6 usage is dropping to less than 1%. So it's no surprise that it doesn't provide IE6 emulation.


5

I think the point John Conde was making was that just because they are technical people you cannot assume they are using a modern browser. Having said that, I tend to agree with Evik James that the OP needs to find the balance between coding the site for a wider audience or getting down to blogging instead. If he wants to monetize this site at some point, ...


5

It's a good idea to wrap phone numbers in tel URIs because: Mobile browsers often parse numbers incorrectly, especially with unusual formats. All they're doing is attempting to wrap phone numbers in anchor links and tel URIs; doing it for them reduces the chance of error. It's a vendor-neutral, official proposed standard that desktop VOIP phone clients ...


5

I'd recommend just about any cPanel hosting provider over GoDaddy or 1and1 - cPanel is a hosting industry standard and is far easier to use than GoDaddy or 1and1's custom hosting management interfaces (at least, that was the case when I last had to work with either - about four years ago). Presently hosting with HostGator.


4

I just go with 3.6 and the newest there is as there are not that many differences between them. Unless you use some really bleeding edge stuff, you should be OK with similar approach.


4

You're conflating two seperate functions for two different audiences. Developers can use meta tags to force IE to render similarly to an older version:- <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7" > Users can click the compatibility view button in the browser front end, which forces IE to render similarly to it's previous version ...


4

Highly-technical users don't necessarily use the latest versions of popular browsers, although they probably do on their main machine. They often use customized or beta versions of browsers, bleeding-edge not-yet-trendy browsers, really-fast or in-their-workflow browsers (lynx/links2, emacs, etc.) and sometimes really old or unusual browsers (whatever's ...


3

You should read about progressive enhancement to support the most part of the users and take advantage of browser's features. Responsive design is another important topic to support the most part of devices (Nowadays a lot of people use mobile devices). On the other hand, out there are a lot of libraries like Modernizr, boilerplate, explorercanvas to help ...


3

I think you should assume they are using modern browsers based on your target market. Keep a tab on browser usage and if significant numbers of people are using older browsers, then make compatibility changes.


3

There should be no need to shift existing websites onto IPv6 for a long time. IPv4 will keep running for years yet. There will be a process where new services begin to use IPv6 instead of IPv4. The two systems will co-exist side by side. To the end user, assuming they have their software up to date, they should notice no difference. If you want to test ...


3

I think your best bet long term will be to completely rebuild/recreate the interface. I suspect that any automated or even semi-automated tool for converting flash elements to something more widely accessible will leave you with lots and lots of cruft, and make future maintenance more difficult and time-consuming. My suggestion is to rebuild, and perhaps ...


3

I test with 3.6 and the latest version. I'm adding in the Android version soon although I don't anticipate there being any big differences there. Unless you're doing HTML5 stuff or something else along those lines you probably won't need to test every version.


2

You might have the option set under your IE options to use Compatibility view for local sites: From http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ie/archive/2009/06/17/compatibility-view-and-smart-defaults.aspx


2

I don't think it's fully released yet, but you might want to check out Smokescreen. It's a Flash rendering engine written entirely in Javascript and HTML5. It is being created with one of its goals being to allow Flash to be used on platforms without native support (such as certain mobile devices).


2

IPv6 is mostly about the "plumbing" between your server and the user. The various parts of that plumbing may or may not be IPv6 compatible. Even if you make sure the network from your server to your ISP is your ISP may not support it. On the other hand, it's worth making sure your webserver software (Apache or IIS say) supports it (Apache v2.0 and upwards ...


2

Ok, so we have confirmed that our calculations were incorrect. Our provider was giving us reports based on the number of "visits". A visit is calculated based on the amount of time a user spends on our website. However, IE7 users might be rare but they might spend more time on a website compared to a Chrome user. This meant that the percentage we were going ...


2

There are no tools for this (making sure your HTML and CSS validates are the best you can do). To effectively troubleshoot this you need to know the limitations, bugs, and quirks of each version of IE. Caniuse.com will tell you what version of IE supports which browser technology. Reading StackOverflow and Googling "IE bugs" will be very enlightening. (I ...


2

Fixing your HTML validation errors will actually bring you a long way to solving your problem. There are probably only about 4 "critical" errors, and most of the others are as a result of these few. To get you started... Line#10 - You have an erroneous double quote inside your content attribute: <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, ...


1

Because of the meta tag your put on your pages, MSIE is running in Internet Explorer 9 mode, even if its a newer version. This usually does the trick with CSS, but other items such as plugins, javascript, and other activex dont really follow the rules. Your best bet is to fix the site so it works for MSIE10+, which in all liklihood means it will work for ...


1

I believe that vmware player supports Windows 8, You should then be able to test the following setups, of course not limited too and only an example: Windows XP IE6 Windows XP IE7 Windows XP IE8 Windows 7 IE9 Windows 7 IE10


1

If your concern is for compatibility, then you would need to change them to HTML5 - many browsers (particularly mobile) just won't execute flash files any more. If you have the .fla file, then you could try opening it in a newer version of Flash and seeing whether it gives you option to export it. I wouldn't guarantee that it will - Flash 5 is 14 years old ...


1

You can't do it from the swf file alone (to the best of my knowledge), but if you have the original fla file it was compiled from you can recompile it with a newer version of the Flash compiler. Some changes may need to be made to the code within the file to account for version differences.


1

Do not purchase anything from 1and1. I had a VPS with them many years ago and many things went wrong, all of which were setup flaws on 1and1's part. Their customer service is terrible and only available during certain hours. Not to be racist but they outsource their call-in-reps so you will almost never speak with an american. I purchased another vps with ...


1

Right now it looks like CS5 can do the conversions from flash to HTML5 but you would need the flash files and it would take some work still it sounds like. Check out this article for more, http://cs5.org/?p=3#more-3. I think going to HTML5 is probably your only real choice because of functionality. However, you are probably going to have to wait a while ...



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