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17

The Webmasters FAQ outlines the nature of acceptable questions for this site: researching available solutions and providing anecdotal advice falls outside the purpose of this StackExchange site, so this type of question would be better-suited to chat or another discussion forum. That being said, there are a variety of free and open source content management ...


11

Content Management Solutions (CMS) are platforms you can install on your web server that allow you to choose or create a theme and begin adding content to your website. CMS solutions are great for blogs, news sites, and basic corporate or informational websites where the intent is to have pages with mostly text, links and images on them. For example ...


10

From here: Pros: The CMS enables your organization to concentrate on creation of content rather than development and design. No new “web pages” are created via code when new content is added. The CMS publishes the content into the framework (design) of your website. Non-technical members of your organization can manage, edit, and publish content to your ...


10

Picking up on what Virtuosi said: A CMS is definitely a good idea, but I would advise having him hire someone to implement a website using a CMS. It should be quicker and higher quality if implemented by a professional. That, in the end, will be better for his business. I'd suggest the actual technology is secondary. Any of the common, widely used CMSs ...


10

A CMS of some sort really is a must nowadays in most cases. Making money off updating clients' sites may have been a business model in 1998, but isn't any more really. At the end of the day, of course, it's a question of cost, benefit and updating frequency. If a site needs changing once every two years, having static HTML pages that are re-worked manually ...


10

I think the best way would be to integrate the shop in the current site (therefor under the same domain). SEO: One domain for both would strengthen that domain (all links lead to this domain, so they are not splitted between info site domain and shop site domain). Usability: Visitors could switch seamlessly between info pages about the company and the ...


8

Wordpress I am a big fan of wordpress for simple small sites. Strengths: A large user base Lots of templates Tons of plug-ins to do anything and everything you can think of A quick development pattern (means we get newer and better versions often) A very simple and easy to understand event/filter model (makes it easy to develop plug-ins) The Loop ...


8

Both Joomla's and Drupal's admin sections aren't great, but Joomla will be much easier to manage, for both you and your end user. Drupal's admin just isn't intuitive by any sense of the word. They're trying to fix it for Drupal 7, but I have my doubts about its effectiveness. Wordpress is by far the easiest to manage. All of the communities are large and ...


8

No. The canonical element is supposed to resolve duplicate content issues on your site stemming from multiple URLs that pull up the same content. Telling the search engines to go to two different places off the same page totally defeats the purpose. My guess is the company is having some issues internally. It might be their CMS builds composite pages from ...


7

BlogEngine.NET is a basic open source one that should be considered. It is geared towards blog posts, but it has the concept of "pages" and can be themed very easily.


7

As you mentioned, Orchard has a lot of potential, but it is still pretty young and not quite ready for production use. Umbraco is another .NET CMS that has pretty good reviews.


7

There are actually a couple of decent open source .net CMS's available that would work within your current infrastructure, meet your needs for open source and are scalable enough for you to run your 400+ document site. If you decided to go down the PHP route, I would advise you to consider a few things (which are also relevant to the above and any CMS ...


7

Won't a WordPress Network do it? http://codex.wordpress.org/Create_A_Network


7

Any comprehensive CMS that supports tiered user levels can be used to build a membership site. You'd need to: Create pages that are only viewable by a certain user level (with a plugin or by modifying your theme's template code). Create a sign up form that adds the user to your database and marks their account 'inactive'. If it's a paid membership site, ...


7

First, this isn't really quite a CMS question(except where maybe you'd be looking for a plugin related to the things I mention below). Roughly speaking your CMS generally doesn't care too much what your content is. It's more responsible for what to do with it, eg. organize into categories, generate listing pages, etc. The overall reason PDFs don't display ...


6

The pros of using a content management solution are: Users have access to update specific parts of your content You have a history of what content was so if a mistake was made you can roll it back. Multiple users have access to edit your site. Sometimes in overlapping areas. Provides a uniform format and feel for your site Provides access to decent layout ...


6

The buy-vs-build question is an eternal one. I would say WordPress and Drupal both meet your criteria. I have more experience with WordPress so I'd do it in WordPress. To address your requirements: Semantic HTML (well formed, proper use of attributes, microformats where appropriate, use of CSS for style and HTML for markup) Yes, most themes for WordPress ...


6

It's not so much that CMS's are bad for SEO, but that you can achieve better SEO when you have more control over the webpage. And CMS's are made to make it easier to produce websites, often at the same time taking away control over the page construction. Basic SEO, like search friendly URLs and sitemaps, are nowadays build into most CMS's. But more advanced ...


6

I can't imagine myself using wysiwyg for css and html. If you like to learn to DESIGN you gotta know the 'backend' 'messy' part. Wysiwyg is ok if you are not building something robust. but definitely invest your time in programming languages. thats the engine.


6

Yes they both matter. Some CMS are more Search-Engine Optimizable than others, so if we think the amount of work as fixed (as in a fixed-budget project), you can reach higher rank and thus more visibility. In practice this mean that a less SEO-proficient person can be used to keep a site updated, as he will have to handle less parameters, or that the ...


6

I disagree with the notion that most sites don't use a CMS, particulary given the global reach of Wordpress, and the selection of Open/Closed Source CMS available, and the obviously successful business models. If you're serious about running and managing a website then a CMS is essential IMHO. If you don't want to use one the simplist way to approach the ...


6

To answer your question: no, it should not pose a problem for SEO. Why not - given that ashx has nothing to do with images, you ask? Because of the MIME type being sent with the file header. The .png file ending is actually not what determine what the browser has to interpret, but rather the file headers of the HTTP request. The file headers sent when the ...


5

Just about any CMS can be run on Windows these days. A good starting point might be CMS Matrix. I remember a while back PHP support on IIS got significantly better, so now there's no need to run Apache to have good PHP support on a Windows server. ASP.NET support is still strong, as well. MySQL and PostgreSQL also run just fine on Windows, and between ...


5

What you're describing isn't really a CMS, but rather features of a Student Information System. These are usually fairly complex enterprise-level applications (the academic equivalent of a CRM + ERP) that have to integrate with the school's intranet systems, government databases (e.g. financial aid databases) and meet stringent regulations regarding ...


5

There are some great answers already available, but I wanted to give you another perspective. I've been developing Wordpress and Joomla sites for years, and I do appreciate Wordpress quite a bit. The downside, though, is that Wordpress is a dog. It is slow. Since you are partial to it, I'll respond about it specifically. Sure there are plugins that enable ...


5

Maybe BuddyPress for Wordpress is something for you. It's a social networking plugin, which may be combined with any other WP-plugins.


5

You should use a CMS when you want an all ready developed platform to manage contents (for the most) and you've usual (I mean common) and not too specific need. You should use a framework when you want to build your own, specific purpose, platform. Hence, you need a base to start your web app/website with, without "reinventing the wheel" (so have a built-in ...



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