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18

I think you are over-simplifying the types of hosting that you could get. Here they are, what they're good for and what they're not so good for: Shared Hosting You are on a server with potentially hundreds of other people. There are pre-defined limits, such as the amount of disk space / databases you can have and the amount of data you can transfer per ...


10

There's a great tool at http://www.webpagetest.org/ which allows you to measure the loading speed of a site. You can choose from a list of locations to test from and there are a few in the UK.


8

what advantages does cloud hosting have over dedicated server hosting? There is no answer to that in the abstract; or the general answer to that is at least too long to type up here. You need to start with a picture of which architecture you desire and which load you forecast, and then evaluate the hosting architecture on that basis. Just for a ...


8

I would strongly recommend against EC2 for your first foray into dedicated hosts. EC2 has very specific applications, and there's a much steeper learning curve involved. At this point, there are coarsely three directions to go, and pros and cons for each: Managed dedicated hosting: I've never shopped for managed hosting firsthand, although I've interacted ...


7

Optimise your application before optimising your server infrastructure It's tempting to throw more servers at traffic spikes or overpay for resources that you may never use "just in case". A better solution is to optimise your application to withstand spikes before they arrive. Specifically: Cache dynamic code Your application should serve static html files ...


7

http://loads.in/ I haven't used the monitoring features, but it does have a great load time tool, which you can choose different browsers and countries to test from.


6

Here's a site that compares a few cloud hosts, although I'm not sure how up-to-date it is: http://www.mrkirkland.com/cloud-computing-price-comparison/ I also compared aws pricing to google app engine, and it seems that yes, aws is the cheapest. However, you should also read about the quality of aws hosting before you use it, as I have heard of many issues ...


5

I'll give my thoughts on VPS, as I have no experience in cloud. I was in the same boat as you in terms of having my shared hosting no longer being reliable in terms of performance. I had roughly 20 websites on the same account, but only a handful of ones that were more than basic html/css/javascript. I chose to get a cheap VPS(I pay $40/mo) and moved ...


5

$10 -- You can't run a website on AWS at this price. The minimal server they offer is a "Micro" instance at $0.02 per hour which is $14.40 per month. Even at slightly over budget you wouldn't want to use a micro instance for a website because the machine is severely limited. It is meant for testing only. As the CPU quota is used up, it may become ...


4

Supplementing Steven's great post: "Managed" vs "Unmanaged" is one big distinction you'll find in hosting. You'll find hosting packages that look equivalent, but some will be much cheaper than the others. The cheaper packages are generally unmanaged. There's no support staff to help you upgrade PHP, tell you why your script stopped working, or tell you why ...


4

That's an interesting and far-ranging question. I'd say the primary difference between "normal" web hosting and making use of a cloud-based service is on-demand (or dynamic) scalability. A "normal" web hosting service usually provides a certain level of service (cpu cycles, bandwidth, storage space, etc.) for a fixed price per unit of time. You pay that ...


4

Try an hosting like 1and1. It's cheap, and supports the load well. They also have some easy to use VPS


4

I think anyone who can provide decent windows hosting will suffice. My vote would be for Rackspace. One other thing I've just remembered: Rackspace do managed sharepoint hosting (although I don't know if managed is the right word) so you don't have to worry about any of the hosting.


4

Pros of CDN: Noticeable boost in rendering time of your pages. Relieving your server load and bandwidth usage In general, the cons that I can think of are Price: Even with the most affordable CDN providers you should count on something like $0.10 per GB of CDN delivery which is generally much higher than a dedicated server's bandwidth. Possible ...


4

Is there any reason to complicate your life using AppFog/PhpFog spendng 29$ per month, when you could simply buy a 45$ per year reliable cPanel hosting service with MySQL (among millions of providers) that will suffice to most of your web application needs for a long time?! And in the case you have a lot of traffic you simply need to send an email to the ...


3

I'm not sure what you mean by "update/modify the data", but there are probably few free file hosting services that allow hotlinking. It's just not a sustainable business model, especially if you have an exposed API wherein not even the uploader will have to come to your site. There are also a lot of copyright infringement liabilities regarding public file ...


2

With cloud hosting you have to watch out for hidden costs. As most cloud hosts charge for usage when you get a heavy burst of traffic you could get hit with a large hosting bill for that period. Most cloud solutions do not have the ability to place a limit on resource used so there isn't usually a way to limit your costs when experiencing bursts of traffic. ...


2

+1 for 100% SLA, every mission-critical application should reside at a host who offers this. In addition I might add that every company has fine print in between the 100% SLA. They might guarantee it on the uptime (ping) and the hardware, but the more intensive stuff comes in when they can offer a 100% SLA for the application itself. If you would like a ...


2

Cloud hosting has a lot of different meanings, but if you are talking about Platform as a Service (PaaS) or Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) then the main benefits are usually the ability to scale out to multiple servers and pay hourly instead of monthly. I wrote a blog post about VPS/VM vs Dedicated vs Cloud Servers: Hosting options and cost comparisons, ...


2

Without an idea of the kind of traffic you'll be seeing or your plans for growth, I can't speak to whether you'll do better with a clustered/grid-computing option or a traditional dedicated server, however, (as I've worked in the hosting industry for years) I can say that you will not find a reputable company with a 100% SLA - there is no such thing as ...


2

I believe Godaddy's Virtual Server Space is a VPS service, not a cloud computing platform. I also don't think Amazon offers such a thing as "Simple Web Services". They do offer Amazon Web Services, which is a whole host of cloud services, including Amazon S3 (Simple Storage Service) and Amazon SQS (Simple Queue Service) and Amazon SNS (Simple Notification ...


2

This really depends heavily on how your frontend servers distribute load. If it's not designed to have extra capacity added to it at the flip of a switch (or maybe better yet, automatically when a sustained spike is detected), then planning for this sort of thing is tough. If you design your load balancing in such a way that you can flip on extra servers in ...


2

Take a look at these articles. There's some good general linux knowledge there


2

I'd say the best way to find out your preference is to give it a try, one of the best features of VPS/cloud servers is that they are typically billed on a pay as you go, so you can spin up a new server try installing everything you want, run whatever tests you want on it and then delete it and it will only cost the hour or so you spent playing. I've used ...


2

Those are rather large for PowerPoint. Also be sure in PowerPoint to double click any image and hit compress and uncheck "Apply only to this picture". The file size should drop dramatically. After compression you could use: Google Docs (1GB) Dropbox (2GB) Windows Skydrive (25GB) but with 50MB max file size


2

There is also a site which calculates cloud hosting prices from various providers - www.cloudorado.com. You can just check how much would cost a server you need from various providers. Amazon is often not the cheapest unless micro instance is used. Update: Here is also an article which tries to answer exactly the same question.


2

I wouldn't call this a simple question! The answers to your many questions certainly aren't simple. Load sharing and replication between databases (the two are different) is a complex subject and probably couldn't be answered in a few paragraphs. However, let's see I can shed some light. Yes, multiple instances in setup 1 will work for mainly static ...


2

Here is a solution that might work for you. DNS / WEB SERVER SETUP Get one static ip address and bind that to your web server. (IIS or Apache). Setup your master domains (example.com) DNS with correct A Records. Now if you visit Example.com then the primary site will show up. For all your other domains just create a Cname record which points to ...


2

Use Wildcard Virtual Host Container in Apache You can configure Apache with a Wildcard virtual host container. You then control what domains are hosted by simply modifying your DNS to point to the appropriate IP address If you have the same content on all pages, then just upload the content. If you require different content, you can use a strategy that a ...



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