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11

URLs that differ in case in the query string are different URLs to search engines. They are not considered equal and would need canonical tags or redirects to tell search engines which you prefer. Different parts of the URL are different in terms of case sensitivity: Protocol (http) -- case insensitive Host name (example.com) -- case insensitive Path ...


10

Spaces in URLs should be encoded. That would eliminate foo abc.jpg as the canonical. Here is a question that addresses how the space should be encoded: In a URL, should spaces be encoded using %20 or +? Spaces may only be encoded as a + in the query string portion of the URL, so that eliminates the foo+abc.jpg as the canonical. Your canonical URL ...


4

When you use 301 redirect, you show to Google that current page it's permanently moved to another url. Cannonical is used to prevent penalties by Google for duplicate content. When you use it, the current page exists but shows to google that is "copy" of another "master page" For example I can give you OpenCart product urls, they are like this: ...


4

Yes, all parts of URL after the domain name are case sensitive. Also, query string case is important not just for search engines but it may be important for your server as well. You may have the following download link: http://example.com?download=/myVideos/CaseSensitiveVideo.mpeg


4

It is a confusing state of affairs, but here are some pointers: Don't use the canonical tag in the way you were thinking. Content translated into several languages is not duplicate content. So you don't want to be pointing /fr/ --canonical--> /en/ at all. Use rel="alternate" hreflang="en" instead. Use canonical within a given language to account for ...


4

It's highly recommended. Google will probably understand what you mean without it, but it's highly encouraged to add it to all pages with the same content including the canonical page itself.


3

My view would be that it doesn't matter for SEO because I'd be noindexing these pages anyway. Google doesn't want to index your search results in its search results, and it's a great way to get flagged for duplicate content. Concentrate on SEO for the actual content pages and do whatever's best for the user experience for these kinds of category pages.


2

you shouldn't set your canonical to the first, but to the current page, like big G said.


2

It is not hurting rankings to show up twice in the search results. It just means that you have two or more pages that Google thinks are relevant for the search term. Combining pages does not usually significantly increase the ranking power of the page. More pages with quality content on your site are much more likely to attract links which help your site ...


2

What happens if your configuration will be detected by a search engine: Mixing canonical links and noindex will mostly lead to search engines ignoring your canonicals. This may lead to duplicate content issues if you also have canonicalized dynamic URLs or alike. Without the canonicals being respected properly the search engines will decide which url is ...


2

We've recently had advice on best practice for a very similar structure. Canonical: Canonical shouldn't be shared across languages, but used within a language. For instance, your Masai homepage would have a canonical tag of: https://www.domain.com/mas But the canonical for your German homepage would be: https://www.domain.com/de x-default: ...


2

You can do in different ways: Dedicate a page to Cheapest all inclusive resorts and differentiate content from the "parent" page. So, modify your copy (concentrate on the "cheapest" aspect instead of generic descriptions), use different images, etc. In that way, you don't need to point canonical to anywhere because you have different and specialized ...


2

Duplicate content is no longer determined in a linear fashion. Today, duplicate content is determined using a semantic scoring method so that near duplicate content will still be seen as duplicate. This is because spammers would simply rearrange the content to avoid content as being flagged as duplicate. As well, n-gram phrase recognition is used to ...


2

Setting the correct canonical URL in the link element should be sufficient (although you might need to verify these "non-existent" subdomains in Google Search Console?), however, it would be preferable to set a 301 redirect which will catch users as well and prevent them linking to the wrong domain, etc. This sort of redirect can be (should be) included as ...


2

There's nothing to worry about here, since http://example.com and http://example.com/ are the same URL. The useragent has to include a path in the HTTP request (as per RFC 2616), so what it sends to the server will be GET / in either case. If you add the verbose flag to CURL this is quite easy to verify: $ curl -v http://example.com * Rebuilt URL to: ...


2

Two pages should use the same canonical URL only if the contents of the pages are substantially the same. In your case, it doesn't sound like any of your proposed pages will have the same content. venues for Boston vs Boston-region. There will be some overlap, but won't the region page have many more on it? If users care enough about the distinction, ...


2

I am not sure if your theory is good because it is based on a very big assumption that your new website will take the credit for your old site after deindexing. Except rel="canonical", you don't have anything else to pass on the credit and if that isn't working now, how can you be sure it will work after deindexing your old pages? Understand that ...


2

Search pages should be disallowed from crawling with the robots.txt see John Mullers comment on What is a best canonical URL for a search result page? thanks dan!


1

In general it might be a good idea to block crawling of search result pages, but there are cases where it can makes sense to allow crawling. For example, if your search is the only or the primary way to navigate the site, and especially if you offer filters (or search operators) with pre-defined search terms. So instead of having a separate /category/ ...


1

Your understanding of the AMP is absolutely fine. Regarding your question, I would always prefer a subfolder (on same domain) over subdomain if I need to use canonical tag as search engines doesn't work as good on cross-domain URLs as they on the same domain URLs. So, I would go with http://example.com/foo.html http://example.com/amp/foo.html or even ...


1

IIRC, Google's panda update penalized this sort of behavior and Google recommends that publishers preferably not do this but if they need to, indicate the behavior in their Google Webmaster console by registering canonical urls/domains For more information, please check the following links: ...


1

This is my 2 cents, but to preserve crawl budget and page authority I would utilize Json breadcrumbs. Another way to add differentiating clicks is to add a google analytics tracking event. From the code below, you're sending an even when your link is clicked and the label is 'page1.html'. You don't need to use javascript either. <a ...


1

You could tell Bing, and other webcrawlers, what to spider and what to ignore using a file called robots.txt in the root of your website. You can tell specific or all crawlers to ignore specific urls. in your case User-Agent: * Disallow: /*?s1=*&s2=*&s3=* you might need to make small changes in the Disallow line depending on the parameters used ...


1

Canonical links does not prevent Google crawling or indexing them, it tells Google the preferred page. It is useful for when pages are duplicate, for example: https://example.com/test.html http://example.com/test.html Canonical can help prevent duplicate pages entering the index, but unique pages will be indexed regardless, tag and category pages are not ...


1

When a crawler reads a website it reads the IP as the domain is just a human readable version of the IP thanks to DNS But to answer your question no I don't believe it matters as 20 websites sharing an IP on shared hosting will not be treated less important than say a single website hosted on a dedicated IP Although the shared vs dedicated IP debate is ...


1

See each deal in itself is a new content even though it belongs to the same business owner/ deal provider. So rel = canonical should not be used. If the same deal is changed / renewed, then it should ideally be done on the same page/ already existing deal page and you can enhance its visibility on site. If a new page is still required for above case, then ...


1

Pagination is not duplicate content... Google will and does index pagination pages regardless of the uniqueness of the page. Also, it is massively common for webmasters to not understand exactly what duplicate content is. Understanding what duplicate content is... Duplicate content is where the exact page appears elsewhere external or internally, ...


1

You can use rel=canonical on the other sites since Google supports cross-domain canonical tag. However, your clone sites will not be indexed for those pages which kind of defeats the purpose. Best option is to always have original content on your sites and custom tailor each for your target audience. To have a successful website you need to provide value to ...


1

I would ask what the impact would be if you do not use the canonical tag? Answer? Disastrous. Since you have duplicated content, then you are effecting your search performance. There is a penalty in the SERPs for this. You will not know otherwise. It is likely that the penalty exists for you now and you may not realize it assuming that this condition has ...


1

Canonical tag won't help you in this situation because you don't want to boost the brand's main website. In order to boost the re-seller websites I would recommend that you add a section in the admin to allow them to add 500-600 words for each page on each website (even if they are selling the same products, different people will write the descriptions ...



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