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11

URLs that differ in case in the query string are different URLs to search engines. They are not considered equal and would need canonical tags or redirects to tell search engines which you prefer. Different parts of the URL are different in terms of case sensitivity: Protocol (http) -- case insensitive Host name (example.com) -- case insensitive Path (/...


10

Spaces in URLs should be encoded. That would eliminate foo abc.jpg as the canonical. Here is a question that addresses how the space should be encoded: In a URL, should spaces be encoded using %20 or +? Spaces may only be encoded as a + in the query string portion of the URL, so that eliminates the foo+abc.jpg as the canonical. Your canonical URL ...


5

The way you/Magento are doing it is correct. As long as you have breadcrumb markup Google will display the category chain in SERP. In the case of multiple categories, the chain displayed depends on which category has most relevance for the keyword. When clicking the SERP you will be taken to the direct canonical page for the item, ie domain.tdl/product-name....


4

It is a confusing state of affairs, but here are some pointers: Don't use the canonical tag in the way you were thinking. Content translated into several languages is not duplicate content. So you don't want to be pointing /fr/ --canonical--> /en/ at all. Use rel="alternate" hreflang="en" instead. Use canonical within a given language to account for ...


4

Yes, all parts of URL after the domain name are case sensitive. Also, query string case is important not just for search engines but it may be important for your server as well. You may have the following download link: http://example.com?download=/myVideos/CaseSensitiveVideo.mpeg


4

It's highly recommended. Google will probably understand what you mean without it, but it's highly encouraged to add it to all pages with the same content including the canonical page itself.


4

Do a 301 redirect. In your case Google won't see it as Black Hat. The only way to get a "Black Hat" mark with a 301 is when you're doing "chain redirection" (i.e. you're redirecting from a first to a second to a third domain etc.). In the situation you've described, there won't be any penalty for this redirection.


3

Two pages should use the same canonical URL only if the contents of the pages are substantially the same. In your case, it doesn't sound like any of your proposed pages will have the same content. venues for Boston vs Boston-region. There will be some overlap, but won't the region page have many more on it? If users care enough about the distinction, ...


3

My view would be that it doesn't matter for SEO because I'd be noindexing these pages anyway. Google doesn't want to index your search results in its search results, and it's a great way to get flagged for duplicate content. Concentrate on SEO for the actual content pages and do whatever's best for the user experience for these kinds of category pages.


3

You need to have two webmaster tools profiles, one for www.example.com and the other for example.com. From now on, you should be looking on example.com webmaster tools profile. Also you need to specify in the webmaster tools that you prefer the non-www domain, go to site settings Site Settings Preferred domain Don't set a preferred domain Display ...


2

Duplicate content is no longer determined in a linear fashion. Today, duplicate content is determined using a semantic scoring method so that near duplicate content will still be seen as duplicate. This is because spammers would simply rearrange the content to avoid content as being flagged as duplicate. As well, n-gram phrase recognition is used to ...


2

There's nothing to worry about here, since http://example.com and http://example.com/ are the same URL. The useragent has to include a path in the HTTP request (as per RFC 2616), so what it sends to the server will be GET / in either case. If you add the verbose flag to CURL this is quite easy to verify: $ curl -v http://example.com * Rebuilt URL to: http:/...


2

Setting the correct canonical URL in the link element should be sufficient (although you might need to verify these "non-existent" subdomains in Google Search Console?), however, it would be preferable to set a 301 redirect which will catch users as well and prevent them linking to the wrong domain, etc. This sort of redirect can be (should be) included as ...


2

We've recently had advice on best practice for a very similar structure. Canonical: Canonical shouldn't be shared across languages, but used within a language. For instance, your Masai homepage would have a canonical tag of: https://www.domain.com/mas But the canonical for your German homepage would be: https://www.domain.com/de x-default: x-...


2

you shouldn't set your canonical to the first, but to the current page, like big G said.


2

It is not hurting rankings to show up twice in the search results. It just means that you have two or more pages that Google thinks are relevant for the search term. Combining pages does not usually significantly increase the ranking power of the page. More pages with quality content on your site are much more likely to attract links which help your site ...


2

I am now in the horrible process of changing domains you should 301 the old to the new, all urls, one by one. Don't canonicalize old urls - canonical is just a recommendation, and you use it in wrong way. Canonical doesn't replace redirect - it signalize to search engines, an url's content is slightly similar to its canonical url. What you should do is to ...


2

I am not sure if your theory is good because it is based on a very big assumption that your new website will take the credit for your old site after deindexing. Except rel="canonical", you don't have anything else to pass on the credit and if that isn't working now, how can you be sure it will work after deindexing your old pages? Understand that rel="...


2

Search pages should be disallowed from crawling with the robots.txt see John Mullers comment on What is a best canonical URL for a search result page? thanks dan!


2

301 redirect from the same domain is not blackhat SEO at all. because you are redirecting form the same domain even if there are many pages, also the page rank will flow from the old pages to new ones. This is the best way for your case.


2

I'd suggest updating the links in your website to the absolute URL and avoid redirections (unless of course you have valuable links pointing to the URL ending with the ID) This is an unnecessary redirection and should better be avoided.


2

Nope, you cannot link to Page A in your hreflang markup if page A says it's a duplicate of page B. You'll end up getting errors in Google Search Console for missing return tags.


2

It’s technically allowed: RFC 6596 allows relative URLs: Specify a relative IRI (see [RFC3986], Section 4.2). RFC 3986 defines that a protocol-relative URL is some kind of relative reference: A relative reference that begins with two slash characters is termed a network-path reference […] It can become a problem if the document is accessible ...


1

It sounds like you're trying to have /primary1 & /alt1 both indexed with the same content. This will appear to search engines as duplicate pages and have a negative effect on your ranking. Without fully understanding what you're doing, it sounds like you just want both URLs accessible, so you'd be better off setting the canonical for /alt1 to point to /...


1

To create valuable rel=canonical designations: Verify that most of the main text content of a duplicate page also appears in the canonical page. Check that rel=canonical is only specified once (if at all) and in the of the page. Check that rel=canonical points to an existent URL with good content (i.e., not a 404, or worse, a soft 404). Avoid specifying ...


1

Look at the Google Official Security Blog, and the gadgets in the sidebar. Look at the links in the blog - where do they lead? The Google blog has very few links - and all of them are HTTPS. Now, look at the typical Blogger blog. They'll have gadgets in the sidebar, that they get from God knows where - and links to blogs and websites that are not on ...


1

If you are using WordPress as CMS you can install Yoast SEO and in that you can set permalink to overcome this issue. If you are using PHP you will need code to set permalink.


1

I would go also for one main URL. Why? Because in general, people don't search for a "green tee-shirt" on Google, they search a "tee-shirt" or a "Calvin Klein tee-shirt", whatever the colour; they only choose the colour when they see the tee-shirt on the website. I think that is the main reason why one main URL with a drop down list for the colour is the ...


1

Often you'll see a query string appended to the URL. So /product/1001/brand-shirt may be the canonical URL, but /product/1001/brand-shirt?colour=green may be used to link directly to that version. Then you can use the URL Parameters feature in Search Console as explained here. Alternatively some JavaScript-y bits may be used, like /product/1001/brand-shirt#...


1

Google's documentation clearly states For language/country selectors or auto-redirecting homepages, you should add an annotation for the hreflang value "x-default" So in this case your x-default should be www.example.com and not www.example.com/en/. To simplify the answer, your use case does not seem to indicate any need for rel=canonical at all. ...



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