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Here is Google's position from an archived live chat session (the link is now dead): *Does inconsistent capitalization of URLs cause duplicate content issues and dilution of page rank? For example www.site.com/abc vs www.site.com/Abc. On Windows hosts, these are the same page, but are different pages on Unix hosts. JohnMu: Hi John, based on the ...


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Two of the most widely used web servers have very different settings for case sensitivity of URLs by default. Whether or not your URLs are case sensitive is likely a function of which you are using: Microsoft IIS - case insensitive URLs - shows the same content regardless of capitalization. Apache HTTPD Server - case sensitive URLs - gives a 404 not ...


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Each URL on your site has its own PageRank. So http://example.com/?id=344 will have separate PageRank from http://example.com/ and both will have separate PageRank from http://example.com/page.html. In many cases a URL parameter will not cause the page shown to change, or will cause a 404 not found error. Either of those may cause the link juice ...


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One solution would be to not show the rel canonical meta tag when Facebook is crawling the page. Facebook's bot uses a user agent string that contains "facebookexternalhit". If "facebookexternalhit" is in the user agent, then don't show the meta tag. Note that showing different content to a robot is called "cloaking". I haven't seen any evidence that ...


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This is one way people canonicalise duplicate product pages on ecommerce and is a valid way to use it. As long as the content on the product page is identical, or a large part of the content is exact and appears on both pages. If the pages are not extremely close in exact words, the canonical designation might be disregarded by search engines. For the most ...


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Sure, cross-domain is fine. Using .mobi was very popular for a while, other sites just use "m.theirdomain.com", it's essentially up to you. Keep in mind that multiple domains for the same site does increase the maintenance overhead, but that's ultimately your decision.


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If 300 or so sites are all publishing the same content it probably is hurting their Google ranking. If it isn't yet, it will at some point. Having the same content available on multiple URLs, especially multiple websites, is exactly what Google doesn't want. They want a canonical source for content so they can ranking it properly and not have redundant data ...


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I would carry on using pagination mark up on both sets of paginated pages. Google introduced the mark up for this specific purpose, it provides a hint to Google that you would like to treat the paginated pages as a logical sequence, thus consolidating their linking properties and usually sending searchers to the first page. If you noindex the paginated ...



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