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190

Here's my wild stab in the dark: configure your web server to return 304 for every image request, then crowd-source the recovery by posting a list of URLs somewhere and asking on the podcast for all your readers to load each URL and harvest any images that load from their local caches. (This can only work after you restore the HTML pages themselves, ...


58

Some of us follow you with an RSS reader and don't clear caches. I have blog posts that appear to go back to 2006. No images, from what I can see, but might be better than what you're doing now.


44

By going to Google Image search and typing site:codinghorror.com you can at least find the thumbnailed versions of all of your images. No, it doesn't necessarily help, but it gives you a starting point for retrieving those thousands of images. It looks like Google stores a larger thumbnail in some cases: Google is on the left, Bing on the right.


37

Sorry to hear about the blogs. Not going to lecture. But I did find what appears to be your images on Imageshack. Are they really yours or has somebody been keeping a copy of them around. http://profile.imageshack.us/user/codinghorror They seem to have what looks like 456 images that are full size. This might be the best bet for recovering everything. ...


23

Update your Apache configuration to include the directives below as part of your core configuration: # # associate .js with "text/javascript" type (if not present in mime.conf) # AddType text/javascript .js # # configure mod_expires # # URL: http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/mod_expires.html # <IfModule mod_expires.c> ExpiresActive On ...


17

Because you told them not to(see under "Controlling Caching and Snippets"): <meta name="robots" content="noodp,noydir,noarchive,nosnippet"/> ...along with several other things not to do. As to why that is, you'll have to inspect your WordPress installation(settings, SEO plugins) and theme files to figure out exactly where that tag's coming from, ...


14

No, it will not remove your site from the listings, only from the archive. So your NOARCHIVE idea is correct. You can read more about how Google treats all of this on Google's own blog: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2007/02/robots-exclusion-protocol.html


12

You can't really control what headers user agents decide to send to you. If the file in question is in the browser's cache and it decides it need to check for a new version then it will. According to this article, these are the situations browsers will request using If-Modified-Since: The cached entry has no expiration date and the content is being ...


11

You have a Vary: Cookie,Accept-Encoding header in the response. That pretty much means that if the proxy (including your browser) wanted to cache this page it should be prepared to cache a new version for every possibly modified cookie vlaue (or changs in accept-encoding). Especially, it would have to keep a record in the first place of the cookies as they ...


9

You can put this in your htaccess: <FilesMatch "(?i)^.*\.(ico|flv|jpg|jpeg|png|gif|js|css)$"> ExpiresActive On ExpiresDefault A2592000 </FilesMatch> It will target files with those extensions (ico, flv, jpg and so on) and set the Expires header to be access time (A) plus 30 days (2592000 seconds). You can also add this at the server level if ...


8

A suggestion for the future: I use Windows Live Writer for blogging and it saves local copies of posts on my machine, in addition to publishing them out to the blog.


7

Use the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine: http://www.archive.org Note that they only have content from at least six months ago available. Otherwise, you can try using Google's cache by searching for "cache:youroldwebsite.com" or using the "Cached" link on search results.


7

Moving unique static files to your own domain to reduce domain lookups and control expire headers is a good idea, provided you're prepared to check the master files for changes periodically. Moving common static files to your own domain is not always a good idea, because you lose the benefit if they're already cached from another site the user may have ...


7

One commonly used solution is to make your image URLs look something like this: http://www.example.com/path/to/images/1.jpg?v=123456 Here, /path/to/images/1.jpg is the actual URL path of the image, while ?v=123456 is just a dummy query staring tacked onto the end of the URL. The query string can be anything — a version number, a timestamp, a hash ...


7

About five years ago, an early incarnation of an external hard drive on which I was storing all my digital photos failed badly. I made an image of the hard drive using dd and wrote a rudimentary tool to recover anything that looked like a JPEG image. Got most of my photos out of that. So, the question is, can you get a copy of the virtual machine disk image ...


6

The largest contributor to the Internet Archive's web collection has been Alexa Internet. Material that Alexa crawls for its purposes has been donated to IA a few months later. Adding the disallow rule mentioned in the question does not affect those crawls, but the Wayback will 'retroactively' honor them (denying access, the material will still be in the ...



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