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22

Hotmail/Live is ... quirky. Much, much quirkier than other email services when it comes to "protecting" users from bulk email. You can find many complaints about Hotmail/Live all over the web about this stuff -- and it's true in my experience. First, make sure you sign up using their SenderID forms. The Sender ID SPF Record Submission Form will put your ...


20

IMHO sending emails to people who subscribed to a different startup is not okay. You could perhaps send a single "please opt in to our new venture" email to all those addresses, but not more than that. You almost certainly want to look at mailing list handling services. Some examples (in random off the top of my head order): MailChimp Campaign Monitor ...


18

I've been in the email delivery software industry for years, and I can tell you that there is is no magic bullet for email deliverability. First, you have to send email that people want to receive. This means email that people click, open, and use the email and that you get a low number of spam complaints. Confirmed opt-in is a great policy, and will gain ...


5

Agreed with the guys above, opt in is opt in for a specific purpose. You need to be very careful about what and how you send...it can be a very expensive mistake if you don't follow all CANN-SPAM regs. But to answer your email question, there are hosted STMP relays that you can purchase access to such as SocketLabs and SMTP.com. I prefer these to a ...


5

600px is generally the max width accepted by the majority of email clients. This article touches on the subject - they also mention creating a fluid layout, which is possibly the better solution.


5

Use an existing newsletter service such as MailChimp. Not only is it free for up to 2,000 subscribers (and 12,000 messages a month), but they offer sign up forms, click tracking, autoresponders, unsubscribe links, increased chance of delivery over hacked-together DIY solutions, and much more. There's little reason to create your own email newsletter ...


5

I used to work for a bulk mail sender and I created one of his mass mail sender. As you pointed, is not a option to use a mail marketing provider, the answer to you question is build your own. As I suppose, you will be sending email only from your domain, and not for any third party, it will be a lot more complicated. To build your own mail marketing you ...


4

While they may have been subscribers to "his last startup" - did they opt-in to receive e-mails from you? If they didn't, and/or they don't have a reasonable expectation that their e-mail addresses will be used for this new venture, it is spam. Just to get that out front. As to your problem, if you aren't going to run your own server, you may want to look ...


4

My honest advice would be to not do it yourself if you want reliable delivery without being flagged as a spammer. Use Campaign Monitor or aWeber or similar who are trusted senders of bulk email. I hope this helps. Cheers, Mark


3

Opt-in is always a good idea, regardless of the legalities, for one simple reason: people who actively opt in are more likely to open, read, and act on the emails you send to them. People who are 'tricked' into receiving email from you through subclauses in the terms and conditions or pre-ticked boxes (i.e. the 'opt-out' system) aren't as likely to buy from ...


3

Yes you need to follow the rules outlined in the CAN-SPAM act. http://business.ftc.gov/documents/bus61-can-spam-act-compliance-guide-business Marketing emails must always follow these rules. Transactional emails are different, and follow a set of guidelines as to how an email is considered transactional. Example of transactional: someone orders a ...


3

As long as you're using a non-blocking SMTP server (in case it hits a bad DNS/SMTP server) then it is a matter of how many different domains are the emails destined for and what is the bandwidth (roughly speaking because the exceptions to the rule appear at the extremes). I would suspect the latter (bandwidth) due to you seeing similar results with an ...


3

It sounds like Gmail is picking up the word 'Unsubscribe' from the opening line of your email newsletter, then displaying that in the message preview to the right of the subject line. The text I've outlined in red is the message preview in Gmail: Here's where Gmail pulls that from within the email itself: As you can see, the opening text of the email ...


3

Perhaps there are hidden features to vCards that I'm not privy to since I primarily use Gmail, but I see no benefits in doing this. vCards are primarily used for exchanging contact info (name, address, phone, email, company, title, url, etc.), which doesn't really apply to newsletters. Newsletters aren't contacts. Most users might put the email address of ...


3

There are a variety of reasons:- Ceding control of email to a local part of the business e.g. someone@pl.microsoft.com, or a different section of the company for account management reasons. A different business controlling email i.e. outsourced situation where the company can't/don't want to cede control of their primary web domain. Denoting different ...


3

There is one major reason that has not been clearly mentioned, and it is SPAM-prevention. E.g. if you register at facebook, you'll receive an email from an address like: Facebook <register+AHkhAc21pbWt5LmMvbQ@facebookmail.com> The main reason I think, is that especially when registering there is a high rate of wrong indicated emails etc, so a high ...


3

You should probably just rate-limit. For example, who generally invites more than 10 friends and family members a day? Give, as google does, a number of invites that gets used up, and then regenerates over time. And reward people who get other people to sign up on the site with more invites, people who send out invites that get no response don't get ...


3

Well, this is risky but the best thing you can do is make yourself look as un-spammy as possible. Following the Can Spam Act guidelines is a good place to start: Unsubscribe compliance A visible and operable unsubscribe mechanism is present in all emails. Consumer opt-out requests are honored within 10 business days. [7] Opt-out lists also ...


2

As much as I love PHP, that is where your bottleneck is in your system. PHP just doesn't have the efficiency of other languages when it comes to text processing. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/603163/is-perl-a-good-option-for-heavy-text-processing Perl is going to be a better choice for processing and sending emails. A few years back I had written a ...


2

With a mailing list that size you may want to consider using services like Constant Contact to handle your mailings. Sure, it's not free, but they can easily handle that kind of volume plus you get the benefit of all of the tools they offer including managing that list. They also handle spam law compliance issues and you don't have to worry about your server ...


2

I recently had to do something similar and I know that Microsoft provides a SPF Record Wizard on their website. Maybe it will help you also.


2

I am not a lawyer, and this is not legal advice. However, assuming you are in the US, if you otherwise follow the entirety of the CAN-SPAM act and put a warning on the refer a friend page ("Only refer people you know! Don't spam strangers!") then you should be ok, however, I would make sure to add a captcha or similar.


2

The laws and acts that governs data protection and emailing various from country to country, while a lot of them change from country to country most say among the same thing and you will need to learn the key points of these and its far to many to list but for example. Not keeping peoples data on file for more than 2 years, you are responsible for safe ...


2

There may well be simpler solutions available, but I myself would write a script that uses the cPanel XML/JSON API to retrieve the list of forwarders, then loop through them and systematically delete all that I found unnecessary. Though, at that point, I suppose you might as well write a script that would allow you to manage the whole shebang outside of ...


2

Is the sending email address in the contact lists of your Yahoo and Gmail receiving accounts? This might avoid the spam treatment.


2

I'm going to break your question into two parts: Where can I send test email? Send test email to a disposable email address service. [1] These services automatically create an inbox for any email you send to them. You can then read the messages in the inbox through their web site, without registration and without a password. For example, I can send an ...


2

Its a bad business move, and you could still sue them. If you reply to that email and they don't honor your request to be removed, and keep emailing you, then they are in dangerous waters. The danger is that they are continuing to contact you after you requested removal. It will be hard for them to prove that you didn't try to call that number and the ...


1

Have you tried Amazon Simple Email Services http://aws.amazon.com/ses/ it's definately a cost effective solution, although I'm not sure how easy it will be to send to 300k of recipeints.



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