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4

The only part of that, where the browser would work harder, is having to parse the extra few characters for each selector. Insignificantly so because the majority of the work is done on creating a CSS Object Model, finding the elements, and applying the property values for each element. For something as small as applying font families, it's far easier to ...


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It's really irrelevant, because you should minify any .css file that goes up. Your code is your signature. If you don't know how to minify .css -> here's the link. But.. from my perspective... I never write code like in Example 2, and it's little bit "wrong" to write css like that unless you are 100% sure that that's it; because if you change anything in ...


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Go to NetMarketShare and filter by Operating System at the top. Note that you need to subscribe to paid "Geolocation Upgrade".


2

71.4% of w3schools users use chrome, not the world as whole. w3schools' audience are programmers who tend to use Chrome because they are more technical than the average user and know that is is better than IE and (arguably) better than Firefox. They also like it's very powerful developer tools which obviously makes their web development easier. When you get ...


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Above answer did not work for me. What did work, however, was this: RewriteEngine On SetEnvIfNoCase X-Forwarded-For .+ proxy=yes SetEnvIfNoCase X-moz prefetch no_access=yes # block pre-fetch requests with X-moz headers RewriteCond %{ENV:no_access} yes RewriteRule .* - [F,L] From: askapache.com The [F] flag returns a 403 Forbidden status code to the ...


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Browsers are only software that sends requests to your website. They can be used maliciously or not. Your website should be designed in such a way that it does not matter what requests are sent, your site is safe. Anything that a malfunctioning browser can do, an attacker could do more directly. So, in a large sense, no, the vulnerabilities in browsers have ...



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