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119

If ( your site does not make money ){ do what makes you happy } else if ( the cost of supporting IE6 > the money you make from IE6 users ) { stop supporting IE6 } else { keep making money from IE6 users }


51

Common reasons people avoid browser upgrades: They can't, either because doing so requires admin access (e.g. university networks), or because their hardware and operating system prevents it (or both). They don't know how. Firefox is famous for prompting people to upgrade. Chrome does it in the background. Safari does it through system updates. But earlier ...


40

I agree that your decision obviously should reflect the business realities and audience of your particular website. That said, large companies officially dropping support for IE6 is still significant. It raises the general perception that it is finally OK to leave a 10 year old browser behind. It also adds ammunition to any case you wish to make to the ...


22

There are actually a number of reasons. Most of them are related to corporations and I think looking at the difference in visitor browsers for corp websites vs personal sites (e.g. amazon.com, zappos.com, etc) Large and Medium size Corporations use software that requires a specific browser, usually IE6. Because of this, they create a software constraint ...


13

I think this has to be dictated by metrics. If a significant number / percentage of visitors is using older browsers, you should support your visitors. What is "significant" depends on the client. ;-)


11

For non-personal sites this should only be done if (for some reason) the site will not perform well in the out-of-date browser. Non-personal sites (be they business, governmental etc.) are not typically there to serve an agenda, so if the site works (mostly) in IE 6 (or any outdated) browser, let it be. Your users aren't there to be lectured on their choice ...


8

I've not seen this answer, so what about piracy? I'd guess that a lot of people use IE6 or older versions of IE because they have pirated systems and they can't do software updates on them.


7

I am a product manager about to spend 40 MD supporting IE6 for a single customer. We sell software into call centers, an unfortunately IE6 is the default platform for many big organizations. My point is it depends, if I was building consumer web software I would have been off IE6 a long time ago, but as long as we have clients using IE6 we have to support ...


6

For a long time, I only tested on Chrome/Firefox/Safari/IE/Opera on Windows, but about 2 years ago, I ran into a problem where the client was complaining about a screwed up layout on their Mac. I looked at the site in Adobe Browser Lab using OS X Safari and indeed it was rendering improperly compared to Safari for Windows. Ever since then, I've stopped ...


4

Depends entirely on your site and what it does. A site where you play games or have fun can demand a lot more from its users, just like a game on a computer can demand cutting edge hardware. A bank can't be as scrutinizing, as it's vital their customers can access the service. A site made for people with disabilities can't be as scrutinizing either, ...


3

For browser that are considered "current" (most recent release of a browser that is still actively supported), we try to ensure that our sites always work. We do not, however, test in browsers that have less than 10% of our traffic (in practice this means testing in latest versions of IE, Firefox and Chrome, we've recently also started testing in Safari on ...


3

Yes That's right, you can select and copy text right out of an SVG! The SVG does not store the text and letters as shapes, but by their "meaning". Given a good SVG viewer or SVG-capable browser, you can select and copy text as you would in a normal document. Note that this will not work with all SVGs: Since the exact font (the "looks") of a text is often ...


3

As of Feb 24, 2011, I go with the following page widths: 960px, fixed centered - for non-mobile web visitors if the site isn't for affiliate marketing. I may use either a 10px or 20px margin inside that, but the "white" part of the page is 960px width. 750px, fixed centered - for sales pages (landing pages) for affiliate marketers. This is because we ...


3

What platforms you test on should be based on your demographic not on other webmasters' preferences or subjective opinions. If your target audience lives in a country that still has widespread IE6 usage, or the client has specifically asked for IE6 support, then you'll need to support IE6. But for many sites out there, explicit support for IE6 is no longer ...


3

As mentioned in Nick's answer, the average internet user doesn't even know what a browser is. Let's focus on users who actually have the ability to update their browser. Corporate ie6 users simply can't. And we already know that Windows XP users will be stuck on IE8 until they decide to buy a new computer or go through the painstaking process of upgraded ...


3

I think the main reason is that most computer users don't have a clue how to fix their system if it breaks. They've had that experience where installing a new application or performing an update has caused their system to become unusable. Thus, they would prefer not to change anything, as long as it is currently working. Personally, I can't blame them. I've ...


3

If your site/webapp considers the Asian market as one of it's primary targets, then you definitely must consider continuing IE 6 support for the forseeable future. According to http://www.theie6countdown.com/default.aspx, China is still sitting at ~33% IE6 usage, South Korea at ~22%, etc. ...


3

You can detect older versions of Internet Explorer using the IE Conditional Comments feature. The following snippet when included in a web page will redirect versions older than IE 8 to a separate page - <!--[if lt IE 8]> <SCRIPT LANGUAGE="javascript"> location.href="legacy.html"; </SCRIPT> <![endif]--> You can also choose to hide ...


2

Boy, it's going to be tough to give you any sort of "real" answer (this is only an answer due to character limits on comments), and even harder to back it up. First of all, I would say ignore w3schools. Anyone who tells you all flavors of IE combined make up 26% of users is clearly skewed towards savvy users. Another thing to keep in mind is that while I ...


2

I think Marco's comment is the correct answer in this instance, whilst most do ones that don't will display the image anyway. Something you might find useful is this Wikipedia article on Browser Image Format support.


2

Depending on the country, the browser usage is very different. In China, for instance, there is 22%+ IE6. When developing for old browsers, keep in mind that even if they support ajax and other fancy javascript stuff, they probably do it a lot slower than more modern browsers. We did a comparison for a customer project some time ago. IE6, compared to a ...


2

Actually with IE it's a bit easier because it let's you run it in compatibility mode for IE 7 and 8 and well as default 9. Just go to "Tools > F12 Developer Tools > Browser Mode" and select the version of IE you wish to run IE 9 under. I wouldn't recommend supporting IE 6 because even Microsoft is trying to get rid of it. As far as other browsers, I ...


2

If you're providing the correct MIME or content types, then it shouldn't make any difference. I think aesthetically though, it's better to have extensions so that if a user wishes to download an image, their computer won't have any issues opening it, and the user would know off the bat what kind of image it is. (Sometimes you'd get a "image corrupt" error.) ...


2

You can use Google for that. You will, at least, see pages that have been indexed by Google. The commande is: site:www.domain.com: https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Awww.spe.gov.al It will returns all indexed pages that belong to this domain. In your case, it seems that all indexed pages are dead except http://www.spe.gov.al/harta/.


2

It's just a tool. You need to evaluate whether or not it's appropriate to use for yourself. For any given project, you might be using some other elements that conflict with it, for all we know. It's a handy library, but nobody can really make a blanket statement that you should/not use it for every project you do.


2

I like to use Normalize.css whenever I possibly can on a new project. It's better than Eric Meyer's CSS Reset in that it actually provides "standardized" styles for elements, as opposed to removing all styles. So yes, it's a great starting point for a new project. You'll want to ensure that the framework or CMS your using won't conflict with it, but it's a ...


2

You are correct, some older browsers like Internet Explorer 8 provide little to no support for HTML5 elements and other HTML5 features. There are online sites which can help you identify what's missing in IE 8 and older browsers, such as this one. There are also open-source projects like this often-cited one, aimed at improving HTML5 compatibility for IE 8: ...


2

Doctype and Microdata shouldn't create many problems. It's possible that it will throw IE into 'quirks' mode, but you will probably be fine. The problem with HTML5 tags like header and article are that older browsers don't recognize them as block level elements. So if you are using them in that way at all you may be in for some layout surprises. There are ...


2

While there are differences, there is not much that cannot be made compatible in older browsers depending upon what you are doing. If you are developing your site and wanting to add features but feel hampered by the lack of advance in the use of newer versions of a browsers, then you have to decide what you are really doing. For example, if you are ...



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