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8

<H1> is where you put the page title (this is in addition to the <title> tag as they serve two similar but different purposes). If your goal is to improve your SEO through breadcrumbs then you will want to use the breadcrumbs microformat. This specifically tells Google, and Bing, that these are breadcrumbs. They will then use that to determine a ...


5

There is no definitive timeframe. In fact, there's no guarantee Google will use breadcrumbs in their search results for your pages. As with anything related to Google displaying search results, you can give them clues and express your wishes as for what to display in the search results but ultimately Google will decide if and when it will happen. All you can ...


4

This is a problem because it potentially will cause duplicate content issues with Google. But you can just use canonical URLs to indicate the one URL you want to represent that page. That easily solves the problem.


4

The position of the H1 tag has basically no relevance compared to the content inside of the tag! A great descriptive text that reflects the contents of the page, is where the time should be spent. Another far more important thing to keep in mind is, how do users react to the placement of the H1 tag. Is it more intuitive for them to have breadcrumbs above or ...


4

If you want to optimize your breadcrumbs for SEO use semantic markup or microformats


4

Yes, markup can be spread all over the page. In fact, you can try it out with Google's own Structured Data Markup Helper, which will allow you to highlight items on a page and see suggested marked-up HTML.


3

If the code is validated, no. The following is: <div itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Breadcrumb"> <a href="http://www.example.com/" itemprop="url"> <span itemprop="title">Dresses</span> </a> </div> Gets validated with any of those tags (<span>, <li>, <div>) and many ...


2

The answer to this is a No for SEO reasons - I don't know why you would want to wrap your breadcrumbs in a H1. If your concerned of your page not having a page title simply add this after your declare your doctype, within your <head> tag - <title>Page Title Goes Here</title>


2

In the eyes of Google the <h1> is one of the most important descriptors of your page's content. Unless your page contains a homepage, list of services, toilet cleaning overview and showcase (which it doesn't) then no don't do it! If you were to keyword stuff the <h1> and <title> for good rankings (which I don't recommend you do) - even ...


2

I would do something similar (breadcrumbs are really only for the user, not for search.) I would store it in a session variable instead of in the URL. I don't know what language you are using, but i use VB.NET so it's simply: session("category") = 6 Then read it back in when loading the product page.


2

You will want to use rel="canonical" if the URL is different but the content is the same. At the very least rel="canonical" will not hurt your SEO value with Google. The only choice will then be which URL is the canonical one.


2

This isn't a problem SEO wise and is encouraged by Google as it aids the user experience. A breadcrumb trail is a set of links (breadcrumbs) that can help a user understand and navigate your site's hierarchy Perhaps you are getting a bit too strung up on thinking about duplicating content. When talking about duplicate content in most cases its ...


2

Perhaps the term you're looking for is a Wizard? 'Pagination' usually refers to a set of results that are too numerous to display at once (e.g. a search result) 'Breadcrumbs' are specifically navigation links that lead you 'back up the path' (as in Hansel and Gretel) to provide navigational context for each page. I have not heard of a 'wayfinder'.


2

It sounds like you're thinking about this all wrong... Firstly, forget SEO, think UX. Both breadcrumbs and tags (and any other additional navigable functionality) should be for the benefit of the website visitor, there is minimal SEO benefit in this sense because what you'll end up with is countless pages on your site competing for similar/the same terms ...


2

Here is a very relevant thread from WebmasterWorld. Many webmasters will do this by placing the same term in the page title, URLs, meta tags, body text, anchor text, header tags etc etc. It is important NOT to do this. Google will know what the subject of your site is without having to repeat the same phrase over and over. That just gives a poor user ...


1

Including the current page in the breadcrumbs is not required by Google: Each breadcrumb item should appear in order, with the first item representing the top-level page, and the final item representing the parent of the current page. Therefore, it should not matter if it is marked up at all. However, the effects of marking it up with everything ...


1

Current breadcrumbs markup in schema.org is a crap. A lot of discussions, but current issues are still not solved. Check out the latest thread about it at public-vocabs. The best attempt for now to solve it is here (not accepted). I advise you to use Google's markup since you're mostly interested in this SE.


1

Okay. Danny, I did not mean to leave you hanging. I tested the following and it worked but with the error, Error: Incomplete microdata with schema.org. in http://schema.org/review. I assume that the review is missing a required element and i do not know what it is. You can poke around to see if you can figure out what is missing. I am sure it is something ...


1

The thing to ask yourself when structuring a website is: How can my users find what they're looking for as quickly as possible? The question for breadcumbs is: How can I accomplish the above so users also know exactly where they are in my site, and how to find other relevant information in as few clicks as possible. With that in mind, something like this ...


1

Those are "breadcrumbs" that Google takes off the text of the page. To get them into the SERPs you need to have links on your page that are separated by > or use the breadcrumb rich snippet markup: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/185417?hl=en


1

This is correct as breadcrumbs are no started showing in Google Search results For anyone using this - may ignore <span class="breadcrumbs pathway"> and use his styling class and rest may only change the domain URL and breadcrumb title.


1

The important thing, I think, is that you have an obvious link to the homepage SOMEWHERE in the page header. So, if the logo is already linked to the homepage, you don't need a second link in the breadcrumbs, and you're better of saving the space for other crumbs. Since you said you're more concerned about SEO, it only matters if the homepage is linked at ...


1

You should use only one breadcrumb and for SEO make sure it uses rich snippets http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=185417 For all other categories which the listing fall into display them elsewhere on the page


1

The most important thing is that a search engine knows what the canonical, the original and unique version of "Service A" is. If "Service A" can be reached via different contexts, locations, click paths, it's better to actively tell the search engine of the canonical version than creating a duplicate content problem and waiting for unwanted search engine ...


1

As for the version you are using it is the Intended to work that way. I suppose you could switch to Joomla 1.5 there is no breaking changes between the two versions, you can have a look here http://deeptechtons.com/ on the front page click the results the breadcrumb will display the title of the Poll itself which is neat.


1

It's only a duplicate content penalty if two URLs pull up the same content or very similar content (e.g. the same content but the content is slightly rearranged/sorted differently). Your example doesn't meet this criteria so it shouldn't be an issue.


1

If you don't have pages for Category A and subcategory, why are you making breadcrumb links for it? Breadcrumbs are supposed to make it easier for users to navigate your website. Linking to pages that don't exist achieves the exact opposite of that. You should remove the unnecessary breadcrumbs, and if you want to show that this product belongs to a ...


1

for SEO, you need a title that is basically the main subject of the page including the keywords you're focusing on for the page, the h1 should be the same or similar (i.e. it should say what the page is about in 1 sentence(ish)). For the breadcrumb to be any good the elements should be links (<a>) to the corresponding pages.


1

I would say no. The semantic meaning of headers, H1 especially, doesn't really lend itself to breadcrumb navigation at all. I'm not sure how strictly search engines adhere to this, but having that many terms in your heading would look awfully spammy. I'd say keeping it in a standard [un]ordered list would be best, or even wrapping it in a nav element (which ...



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