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46

This is very likely Google can estimate your bounce rate, if you take into account a new feature that detects when the user is clicking the back button: Search Google: Click a search result. Click back. Google is showing a new option, "Block all [site] results": Obviously, that is a guess, but quick back clicks may be good indicators of irrelevant ...


26

To the best of my knowledge, the rankings team does not use bounce rate in any way.   — Matt Cutts, June 2010, Search Engine Land interview I have an issue with the concept of long/short clicks being used in their ranking algorithm. There are too many scenarios where both short and long clicks occur that are the opposite of what the ...


13

Per Matt Cutts Without reading the article [trying to confirm a connection between rank and bounce rates], I’ll just say that bounce rates would be not only spammable but noisy. A search industry person recently sent me some questions about how bounce rate is done at Google and I was like "Dude, I have no idea about any things like bounce rate. Why don’t ...


10

I think that the problem with using bounce rate for ranking is that it doesn't take into account the fact that bounces aren't always a bad thing. This metric needs to be taken in context because there are some sites for which you might want to actually increase your bounce rate! In fact, as an example, your sites might be that type of site (at least from ...


7

I manage a site that brings in around 30k pageviews per day. It lost 1/3 of its traffic around April 11th (panda international rollout). The entire domain lost traffic across the board. The overall average bounce rate hovers around 65% (pre-panda was 71%). The hardest hit pages have bounce rates over 75% however. It's an interesting theory. To google's ...


6

This kind of attack won't affect your rankings as bounce rate is almost certainly not a ranking factor. It's hard to say why this user is doing this but I doubt it's to manipulate your bounce rate or site stats. More likely reasons are: they are trying to attack your site through that page. that page being loaded somehow benefits them and thus they are ...


6

A bounce occurs when a visitor looks at the page and then leaves the site, ie. doesn't go through to another internal page. This would happen all the time if you had a 1 page website. Another cause may be that you have very few call to actions drawing users to other pages, or your page gives them all the info they need so they don't need to go to another ...


6

Google says: By default, the event hit sent by _trackEvent() is considered an interaction hit, which means that it is included in bounce rate calculations. So if someone triggers one of your events, it is then not considered a bounce. You can get around this by adding an opt_noninteraction parameter to your _trackEvent()


4

Google is almost certainly using usability signals as a significant factor in the rankings. Google probably doesn't use "bounce rate", at least not as measured by Google Analytics. Instead, Google relies on: Click through rate (CTR) - The number of people that click from the SERPs to a site is a good indication of whether the site is relevant for the ...


4

In Analytics: Acquisition > Channels click on "Organic Search" - this gives the report with the evolution of organic traffic. On the top of this graph you see Sessions vs (Select a Metric) - click on the (Select a Metric) and start typing "Bounce rate" in the search field - select when the field appears. This should be the graph you're looking for.


3

While this question is interesting in the hypothetical sense, it lacks the action-ability part of being practical. Suppose for a minute, that the answer is yes -Google uses bounce rate for ranking sites -what would you do about it? The only way to reliably increase this metric would be to put artificial blocks between the user, and the answer marked as ...


3

the data is correct, your math is too. the only difference on why you get a discrepancy of 1244 is because you are calculating with only 2 decimal numbers. if for example your "real" bounce rate is 91.7653% (and not 91.76% flat) that would result in 89659 direct entrances .917653 * 97710 = 89663 .644353 * 89663 = 57774 and so forth also your total exit ...


3

Based on my experience and my understanding of how javascript works, the Google Analytics code only records data related to the moment the user first loads the page and the javascript is run. So if a user only looks at one page, they would have a time on site of 00:00:00, regardless of how long they looked at a page. The GA code has no way of knowing when ...


3

You're probably seeing bots of some sort. They're very common online, used by everyone from large search engines (good) to e-mail spammers (bad). Just make sure they don't recognize things like e-mail addresses that don't help your SEO anyway, and it should be fine.


2

Actually Bounce rate is the factor that indicates the ratio between number of visitors viewing only one page of your site and the number of entries to our site. If you get high bounce rate means viewers are closing your site without viewing more pages and spending less time in your site. I saw your site and it looks nice. I have a question for you 1. Did you ...


2

If you are experiencing high bounce rates that is a good sign your pages or content are either low in quality or poorly designed. Specifically it might be: Poor content If your content isn't high quality users will know (by not finding what they are looking for or not feeling confident in your data) and go look for another website that offers better ...


2

I work on a site that gets a ton of short-duration, hi-bounce traffic from Iran. It turns out that the acronym for our business is the same as the acronym for a big company in Iran. Iranian visitors see that it is not the site they are looking for and leave. Have you looked at search words for visitors from Japan? It might be that you rank high in google ...


2

Yes, but you'll need to manually configure Google Analytics to track virtual pageviews. When adding the tracking script, you'll need to add a page parameter to the send method that specifies the pathname (i.e. /about-us), which you would update dynamically when the AJAX calls are made and the user transitions to a new pathname. It should look something like ...


2

It only has one page and you have a bounce rate of 83%? Bounce rate means they only visited one page and then left. If it is only a page that should be 100%. Don't worry about bounce rate for a single page website.


2

Bounce Rate is a major factor in how Google gauges user satisfaction with your site. A higher bounce rate can indicate dissatisfaction or satisfaction. Confused? Some sites answers the users question immediately. In this case, a high bounce rate is good. Data driven sites are good for this. Still over-all, you want to reduce your bounce rate, and increase ...


1

There is a chance that the keywords you are targeting are also catching people who are searching for them in another context. They then click your ad, see the contents have no relevancy to them, and leave. In Google Analytics, go to Acquisition > AdWords> Search Queries. Here you can see what people are searching that brings up your ads. You could find the ...


1

First, lets define what 100% bounce rate is: Bounce rate of 100% means the person who clicked on your ad only visited the target landing page and did not go to any other page or perform any other actions. So people are visiting your site but they are not engaging with the landing page. This is very common and the only way to improve is to optimize your ...


1

The pages are all noindex to Google and the pages only went live today so there is no other way to access them. Firstly, just because they went live today doesn't mean they won't be indexed today, I have had pages indexed the same day many times. Secondly, They are probably indexed on a whole load of other search engines. Try blocking in your ...


1

Generally a sudden increase in the bounce rate is multiple GA tags firing on one site. If you are using GTM, check the tags section, otherwise look in your code (maybe if you are using a CMS you have multiple analytics plugins active). A great tool to help you track these issues down is the Google Tag Assistant. Simply install it, enable it on the site, ...


1

Your two bullet points are a distinction without a difference. The bounce rate shown in Google Analytics is calculated by the users clicking back from a visit from Google. The actual effect of Bounce Rate on the SERPS is an unknown variable since Google doesn't release this info. I can tell you from personal, anecdotal experience that reducing my site's ...


1

If you use Google Analytics you can go to the visitor flow section within visitors. The default setting is Country, so you see a nice computation of visitor interest by country. You can get a listing of all target pages there and see the percentage of exits, followed by their first (next) and second and so on interaction (See here at Google Support). You ...


1

I'm not sure of a way to do it using In-Page analytics. But, if you add EventTracking to that particular action, you can set that particular click event to not be including in your BounceRate calculation.


1

One thought is to give users reasons to stay on the site and do more. For instance you could have a shadow box that pops up after a user clicks on the get deal button that shows them similar deals or you could add a level of engagement with a comments section and social media share buttons.


1

It looks to me like your homepage is receiving a bounce rate of 70% Your 404 page - 68% The page where you are asking for user information - 67% The download page for the s/w - 43% You should first look at optimising your homepage in terms of CTAs and user experience before implementing exit surveys as these (in my opinion) give an incredibly clunky and ...


1

Look at the following Sources they are coming from and then check how you show up on those sources Order pages by time on site and bounce rate and check which pages are affected the most If you are using a translation software, get your content checked manually. There might be some undesired but highly popular typos ranking high in local search engines. So ...



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