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1

You'll get a penalty if you're trying (regardless of your level of intention) to have two or more copies of the same page indexed. If you still want both copies live, then you'll have to determine which ONE page from each set of same pages you want indexed. As for the remaining pages in each set, you can either: Declare it canonical to the original. In ...


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I am assuming that you are saying that you are worried about them having duplicate content. One option would be to set one of them to be removed from the search engine index, such as by serving a 404, and then adding a robots.txt rule to prevent re-crawling them. The easier option, though, if it is acceptable to you, might be to create a redirect from one to ...


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Your understanding is correct. The sequential link types are for documents that are "part of a sequence". I would only use it for blog posts that belong together ("… Part 1", "… Part 2"), for a blog post that is paginated, or for blogs where the order of the posts matters (e.g., in a diary, where each day has its own post). Or in other words, only in cases ...


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Rel="prev" and rel="next" is used to group related pages together. Since you say your article is a single article (that fits all on one page without requiring the user to click a link), you can remove rel="prev" and rel="next". If in the future, you split your long article into pages, then you need to use rel="prev" and rel="next" to connect those pages ...


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There are advantages and disadvantages to each option and there is much discussion about this that there is no definitive answer. But I would recommend building the blog portion into the website for the sole purpose of control. You have less control when hosting with a third party service like Wordpress or Tumblr, though you can also do both (host it on the ...


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It depends upon what you are talking about. For example, if your blog ends up being under another domain such as example.blogger.com, then I would say do not do this. However, if you can create a sub-domain of your own domain, then this would be fine. The danger is if you do host your blog on another site and create a sub-domain that points to the other ...


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How your blog is built on the page makes no difference when it comes to SEO. The fact that it says "blog" doesn't even make a real difference in SEO. The whole point of having a blog on your site is to improve SEO through linking, fresh content, and keywords. An average site may have no need to change most of its content over time. This makes the site go ...



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