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64

Although there seems to be less difference now than there was in the past, hyphens are recommended if you want each of the terms in your URL recognized as an individual word. The reason for this is that search engines find it easier to treat hyphens as word separators, just as they are in the English language. Underscores, however, are not normally used in ...


16

This article by Jeff Atwood always clinched it for me: Of Spaces, Underscores and Dashes: This_is_a_single_word, but this-is-multiple-words. ... though this no longer seems to hold in the case of Google (try searching for "web-site": it is considered as one word).


9

Be sure you use the <address> HTML tag and place your address in it. If you don't want to use your home address use a PO Box or a UPS store address (be sure to have a box there). Place it in the footer of your website and on your contact page. Also, add your business to Google Places.


7

I'm glad you know there isn't going to be a bulletproof way to accomplish this. That means your outlook is at least realistic. Since JavaScript is not an option I would say you're left with: Check the user-agent for the word "bot" in it. That will catch most of them. Compile a list of known bots and filter them based on some kind of unique identifier, ...


7

Personaly, for static content, I prefere host it in an other FQDN like that: static.mydomain.invalid/img static.mydomain.invalid/js/{my-scripts} static.mydomain.invalid/js/libs/{my-libs-eg-mootools} static.mydomain.invalid/css static.mydomain.invalid/css/img static.mydomain.invalid/[...] it's simpler, you don't send cookies's informations to your ...


7

After claiming your listing with Google Places as well as Bing, and BOTW local listings. I start with the local citation finder. This shows where your top local competitors are promoting their website http://www.whitespark.ca/tools/local-citation-finder/ and will give you a good idea of where to promote locally. Also depending on the industry Yelp can be a ...


6

You may want to look into <link rel="canonical" />. See http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2009/02/specify-your-canonical.html. Down in the comments someone from Google says that it can be used for http/https issues. Caveat: I'm not sure if and to what extent <link rel="canonical" /> is supported by search engines other than Google, ...


6

There's nothing explicitly wrong with it. It's just a domain. It's as cumbersome as you choose to make it. Some legitimate concerns, however, would revolve around the testing of security and certificates, etc. Since certificates are based on the TLD, it would be impossble to run tests against any web service that sits behind an SSL layer. Similarly, ...


6

If the content can be reached without JavaScript enabled then your question doesn't make any sense. It isn't "entirely Ajaxified" if you can get to the content through other means. Really, what you're asking is, "is it okay to enhance my user's experience through Ajax?". The answer is obviously "yes". edit Back when Google came out with its crawlable Ajax ...


6

Are you looking for the coding spec as opposed to design layout? The newest working version of HTML, HTML5 is being led by the WHATWG group. You might also check out Mozilla's Developer Network. These are the 'bring your propeller hat' websites that you may be looking for. The WHATWG site describes the spec as it is now and the Mozilla site describes ...


6

If the domains are serving duplicate content, or even similar content with minor variations, you run the risk of being penalized for that by the search engines. At least, that's my understanding from all of the articles I've read. Irrespective of that, there are many reasons you should be using the <link rel="canonical" href="..." /> tag in your page ...


5

There are three fairly simple ways: Use Google Analytics, which will process and handle all the data for you, and present you with detailed statistics for visitors and how they got to your site. This is by far the easiest solution. Use Javascript to do the counting. When the page has loaded, generate an AJAX request to your counting script. Robots and ...


5

It's not a bad practice, you can buy all the visitors you want. Most companies that offer these services will run a program connecting to your website through proxies increasing your unique visitor count. Though the visits will be less than a minute with 100% bounce rate. It does nothing for your rankings and ruins your Analytics data. It's a waste of money ...


4

The 301 redirect is what you want to use if SEO is your primary concern. The 301 redirect will not only tell the search engines your pages have moved (assuming you are currently using both the www and non-www versions of your pages) but also help them associate the old URLs with the new URLs. This means any links you have to your old pages will count towards ...


4

It's not a common convention to display a drop down menu under a Home link, so it's probably better to avoid it. Navigation is best presented as a distinct and obvious list of links, not a hidden area that only a small portion of your audience may discover. Some would go further and argue that no 'Home button' is needed at all; it is a common convention to ...


4

(If this isn't just an abstract idea and you have an actual situation to deal with at the moment, maybe you should narrow the question down a bit with that.) Generally speaking the "home" concept only has a single function that reasonably goes along with it. I don't think I've ever seen a home menu item with sub-items, but any rule in UI design tends to ...


4

It doesn't matter since meta keywords have no effect on a page's rankings. So, use whichever one you think describes something properly. "Ferrari car" doesn't do that as Ferrari is a brand name and can stand alone. "Blue widget" and "green widget" should obviously not be broken down into "widget, blue, green" as that wouldn't make any real sense.


4

It's not the search engines' place to decide how long URLs should be; they just have to index them. That said, extremely long URLs with lots of keywords and such might start getting you flagged as potentially suspicious. They don't come up(for me) as much anymore, but think back to when search results for certain things tended to be overwhelmed with matches ...


4

The question is how does Google see these alternatives? And can we use both without ruining the perceived quality of the page/site? Sure. It's common practice, and good form, to display the acronym after writing the full term for the first time. That way all readers know what the acronym is and to expect the acronym to be used going forward. You ...


4

I would always load the signature dynamically. That just makes it easier for moderators: if a user has an inappropriate signature, but a good post, they don't need to go back and edit every post with that signature. That lets them deal with the signature separately. In addition, that means that the signature wont be accidentally altered if someone edits the ...


4

Well, it really depends on how big is your business, how unique is your domain name and how much you can spend! But the short answer is, yes, they should do it and it's important too! Let say your company currently have these two domains: pieglobal.com pieforensicconsulting.com IMO you should also secure other popular TLDs with similar names, such as: ...


4

Matt Cutts suggested letting link juice flow and to not try and sculpt your PageRank http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/pagerank-sculpting/ It's pointless to set nofollow on an internal link going to an image with a relative path. Googl's smart guys, they spend millions on their algorithm so do you think that is fooling anyone or helping that site?


4

This sounds to me like the exact case for which Google created the canonical tag. You have multiple URLs for the same content with only very minor differences. But you do have some differences that are important to users, so you can't just use redirects. You have a preferred URL where you would like users from search engines to land. Google recommends ...


3

I'd stick with your current system, although I may be biased as I use just about the same names myself. I find that keeping a three letter folder name is verbose enough to have meaning, but concise enough to keep my URLs tidy. Trimming each folder down to a single letter is overkill, and as mc10 points out, is widely open to interpretation. For instance, I ...


3

One thing to keep in mind is that DNS does not provide a redirect - adding an A or CNAME record will only provide your IP address to people that type in that URL. If you only add one of these two records, www.example.com and example.com would both resolve to your web server, essentially giving each page on your site two addresses and potentially wreaking ...


3

Without knowing the keywords or the sites I would speculate and point out the following: The hidden text behind the flash file may not be doing them any good. It may be there, but that doesn't mean it is helping their rankings. There is a good chance that attempt at keyword stuffing is being ignored.. The links exchanged across the microsites isn't black ...


3

Why not just use a singular notification@sitename.com to simplify management of different kinds of notifications? You can use the subject to specify the content, such as, "User commented on your question" "User suggested a solution to your question" "User commented on your suggested solution" etc


3

Check out http://gawker.com/ - this site almost completely loads after the fact. They use "hashbangs" (http://mydomain.com/#!some_section) to determine which content page should be loaded, the main navigation stays static. Check out http://mtrpcic.net/2011/02/fragment-uris-theyre-not-as-bad-as-you-think-really/ for a short tutorial on the concept Gawker ...


3

First things first The pros AJAX can allow you to use a common "base" page and just load the content areas, which can cut down on the load time for users, since a large part of the page is already loaded. Can allow some eye candy such as fading the content area in and out. The cons Doesn't play nice if the page is downloaded. Can mess with disability ...


3

A number of things need to be in place for this to work properly. First of all your page needs to say which text encoding it is using. You need this at the top if you haven't already: <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> The website user then needs to have a font installed which can display that character. You have ...



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