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44

A single powerful server can only be upgraded so far. Once you have the most powerful server available, your site cannot grow more without splitting it between servers or making it more efficient. There is also the cost factor. A single server that is super powerful may cost ten times as much as two servers that are half as powerful. You want to be able ...


27

From Rear Admiral Grace Hopper: On the building of bigger computers: "In pioneer days they used oxen for heavy pulling, and when one ox couldn't budge a log, they didn't try to grow a larger ox. We shouldn't be trying for bigger computers, but for more systems of computers." source


11

The real answer is to use whatever suits your site best. Some facts: Keywords in the URL aid SEO and give users an idea of what the page is about. This is true for both static and dynamic URLs. The consensus is that a lowercase slug, separated by dashes, is the best. Search engines index dynamic URIs (e.g. index.php?page=about) just fine. Using ID numbers ...


9

Stephen explains the major consideration to make when deciding on a systems architecture: the tradeoff in vertical and horizontal scaling. I'll add a few other considerations: Separation of concerns: you mention multiple radically different systems: reverse proxies, DB, content servers, etc. From a maintenance and security standpoint it is clearly ...


8

Size limit. We like to pretend that a single box with multiple processors, memory chips and disks is uniform. This isn't entirely true, but it's true enough if your numbers don't get too big. There are technical limits on heat, energy, proximity etc. which means there'll always be a practical limit on how big a single server can be. Scalability - there's a ...


6

Let's take the problem at small scale. A tiny office with one server running mail, ActiveDirectory, file share, and the web site for the company. Hackers hit it and you have to reboot because IIS is messed up. Or Exchange needs an update and a reboot. Or Active Directory got corrupted. Any of these isolated "one service is down" problems affects the ...


5

Neither: http://example.com/good-uri-design or at least: http://example.com/articles/good-uri-design Good slugs are not necessarily the same as the title, they should be concise and use URL friendly characters.


5

I think the idea of a "separated" application that relies heavily on JavaScript/AJAX is going to get you into a lot of trouble. A few things off the top of my head: It's going to be bad for SEO since Google will have a hard time indexing anything. It's going to be hard to make it "bookmarkable" You'll have a hard time with mobile devices as many of them ...


5

What are the minimum requirements to get this done? Once you have at least two servers behind a load-balancer, you can sequentially remove a server from the cluster, update it, and add it back to the cluster to complete the update (insofar as the visitor is concerned). What can we do to build applications that make this possible from the ...


4

This advice, from Jakob Neilsen, was written back in 1999 but still seems pertinent today: The URL will continue to be part of the Web user interface for several more years, so a usable site requires: a domain name that is easy to remember and easy to spell short URLs easy-to-type URLs URLs that visualize the site structure URLs that ...


4

These resources might help: 11 Best Practices for URLs How to make URLs user-friendly


4

First off, whether you go with an Asynchronous heavy website or not won't have much affect on your ability to build iPhone/Mobile and desktop apps because it has nothing to do with them. Either way you won't be able to reuse your code. Also, Asynchronous sites can be just as slow or slower than normal sites. Usually, that kind of functionality is added for ...


3

The easy answer is yes. if you have 2 domain names for the same thing the organic results might get "divided" between both sites. Like if they were competing for attention. As a rule of thumb it's always easier to market a single domain name. The problem with two is that organic links will be divided. some people will link to your marketing site, others ...


3

Is Card sorting the sort of thing you mean? There are lots of online tools for this, e.g Optimal sort, plenty more if you google it.


3

It's not a single page. (This should be obvious just from viewing source.) There are separate documents, like this one, being loaded via Ajax. In Firefox, open Firebug and enable the Net tab. When you click the navigation links, you'll be able to see the GET requests for them.


2

First, no offense if this answer is too obvious or basic. Your use of "separated" instead of terms like Ajax or jQuery makes me assume less experience with this topic. Of course i could be misreading the question, so my apologies if that's the case. Use both, but wisely Think of your choice of server-side or client-side tasks in terms of where and how a ...


2

I wouldn't call this a simple question! The answers to your many questions certainly aren't simple. Load sharing and replication between databases (the two are different) is a complex subject and probably couldn't be answered in a few paragraphs. However, let's see I can shed some light. Yes, multiple instances in setup 1 will work for mainly static ...


2

You can target HTML5 browsers and use local storage to store the data for offline use. These articles give pointers on how to synchronise the local and central storage. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1744522/best-way-to-synchronize-local-html5-db-websql-storage-sqlite-with-a-server-2 ...


2

http://code.google.com/p/google-refine/wiki/ClientSideArchitecture Google Refine's client-side is in HTML, CSS, and Javascript and uses jQuery and jQuery UI. It basically means to use HTML, CSS, Javascript, jQuery, AJAX efficiently in the clients browser letting their computers take load off your server and process data faster.


2

See http://codex.wordpress.org/Integrating_WordPress_with_Your_Website


2

I personally use a bit of both... I place all the images with a general purposes (things like : design, icons, site content, sprites, etc..) in a single directory. Then for everything related to a single "thing" on my website, by example a .jpg avatar related to a single user, I put that in a specific directory but inside of a centralized structure.. ...


1

If one tries to have one machine do the work of two, some parts of the machine will need to be larger but run at the same speed, some can stay the same size but will need to run faster, and some will need to be larger and faster. The extent to which it makes sense to combine the roles of smaller machines into a larger one, or split the roles of larger ...


1

Since each subsidiary has its own brand, it seems more logical for users to land on a site for each company with its own related domain name, rather than on a site with a different name and domain where the company info they're looking for is in there somewhere. It's probably better for SEO too - a site for TechWidgets Inc. on techwidgetsinc.com with content ...


1

There is no difference for SEO because URLs, linking and content would be the same. Even if you want an answer regarding SEO, your choice must be driven by which site architecture is the most relevant in your case. A good site architecture improves users browsing on your site and don't forget taking care of users is the best option to improve SEO. Do you ...


1

Many people assume that you should only ever use one H1 on the page otherwise it dilutes the actual content of the page, this simply isn't true. A H1 Company name and then a H1 for the content is absolutely valid by all means. Google has the ability to work out which is the content of the page and what is not, such as headers and footers. If are still ...


1

If you are looking at images for SEO benefit, then forget about where to put them in your directory structure. Better look at creating an image sitemap and submit it to Google Webmaster for indexing.


1

The location of images has no effect on your rankings, it will use the URL of the page and not that of the server, otherwise those with Content Delivery Networks wouldn't use content delivery networks. The file name however does help a little. So rather than having product1-large.jpg You should use something like this: <img ...


1

I would suggest a solution similar to Amazon's affiliate tracking. Amazon uses a cookie to denote which affiliate referred the client to their site using a special token in the GET arguments. For example, you might have a redirect like: store1.com => acme.com/?ref=store1 This would create a cookie on the client's machine which would allow you to ...



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