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1

Change your to From: http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/core.html#allowoverride Only available in <Directory> sections AllowOverride is valid only in <Directory> sections specified without regular expressions, not in <Location>, <DirectoryMatch> or <Files> sections.


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The problem is that you have a api directory. The Apache code that handles redirects to add slashes to the directory is happening before the rewrite rule. Move your api directory to something else (like apiscripts) and then use the rewrite rule: RewriteRule ^api$ apiscripts/index.php [L,QSA] You need the flags on the rewrite rule: L (last) -- so ...


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Actually, there is a way to tell which plugins may be the problem. The P3 plugin (ironically, written by GoDaddy) can be used to generate a report of what each plugin is doing in terms of runtime. Longer run times will usually correlate with more resources consumed and give you some initial guidance on which plugins to examine first.


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It appears that your APACHE_LOG_DIR variable is not defined. See this thread. It says that you need to define it in /etc/apache2/envvars. I'm not sure exactly where then envvars file would be on a Mac, but it should be with all the other apache2 configuration files. Alternately, you should just use a hardcoded path rather than ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}. For ...


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Having a server serve unparsed PHP files is a big security hole. It means anyone else would be able to read the code. What happens if you have some files with a password on there? The other issue is speed: loading so many files (dozens, if not hundreds) from a completely different server would be very slow. If you were hosting multiple sites on the same ...


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It is fine to redirect multiple times A -> B -> C as long as the chain of redirects isn't too long. Web clients give up after some number of redirects. Googlebot will follow only five chained redirects I tested Firefox and it supports 20 chained redirects I tested Chrome and it supports 63 chained redirects (it reports an error to the user after 21 but ...


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There is no penalty as a result of multi-chain 301's no but a small amount of weight passed is lost (it is tiny so nothing major to worry about) but obviously the more in the chain, less weight is passed through to the final destination like so:- 301 Redirect 1 (97% weight passed) - total 97% 301 Redirect 2 (97% weight passed) - total 94% 301 Redirect 3 ...


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Editing MAC's host file You will first need to edit your operating systems host file, on a mac this is a rather simple procedure that you should be able to follow with ease. Open your terminal application (normally /Applications/Utilities/Applications.app or you can may even perfer to use your standard text editor. In the terminal type nano ...


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It's possible, yes. Either you can: change your httpd to redirect your URL. In apache that's with mod rewrite Create a reverse proxy that redirects incoming URLs and rewrites.


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To get a website up at a domain name you need to follow these steps: Register the domain name. At the registrar, point the NameServer (NS) records to the domain name server (DNS) that will be handling the domain. On the name server, add records to resolve the host name to your server. Configure your web server to handle requests that come in for that ...


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Look ubuntu documentation of Bind9 https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BIND9ServerHowto


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It is not exactly the answer to your question but you should think twice about removing trailing slashes for directories. The doc about DirectorySlash warns from potential problems (a mess with relative urls and others). And you can save some headaches by only redirecting with a 301 /dir/index.html to /dir/ (nearly your point 3), and using DirectoryIndex ...


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So there are already some answers given. For the second set, the one with the http://url in the request, these tries to find badly configured (not secured) proxy servers that could be wide open. These can then be used to hide the real origin of attacks/scans directed onto an other machine. The other machine will then see the attack as if it was coming from ...


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Okay. Most of these access (at least) are landscaping attempts to find potential vulnerabilities on your server. They are trying to fingerprint your server to know what web-based applications are installed. The first set and third set are clearly landscaping. The second set may be a result of forged request headers but still likely to be landscaping- not ...



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