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It depends on your site. If you run a special site involving high security and you want only select individuals located in several different countries with certain browsers to access your site and a login (or something unique to the user) is required to access the majority of the content on the site, then I'd say go for HTTPS. If you have a generic site ...


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If an attacker is able to put himself between your origin server and CloudFront endge location - it won't be so difficult for him to capture your HTTP traffic and extract your information. Theoretically, it can be done on side of your ISP. It is called as a "Man-in-the-middle" attack: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man-in-the-middle_attack If you trust your ...


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Answer is aws ec2 run-instances --image-id ami-9fbbfaf5 --key-name key2 --security-groups mysecuritygroup --count 1 --instance-type t1.micro where ami-9fbbfaf5 is the ami for image, key2 is my key name and mysecuritygroup is the name of security group. Please ask if required to be more descriptive. I can alternatively, even link to my tutorial page where I ...


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AWS loadbalancers have the ability to handle all the encryption. That means that you put the certificate only on the load balancer. Client web browsers connect to the load balancer via HTTPS. The load balancer then connects to your instances via HTTP. In that configuration the load balancer is the only place that needs the certificate. The individual ...


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I had the same problem last week: My amazon server was somehow compromised. I received an abuse report from amazon stating my server was being used in a DDOS attack on a website. When I logged in I found an application /usr/share/tomcat7/breeb was running in memory. I expect there is a weakness in tomcat 7 which means a remote user is able to upload a spam ...


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It doesn't matter where the CSR is generated as long as its generated in a compatible format, i.e OpenSSL, IIS, Microsoft Exchange and Keytool. It's extremely common for people to use different devices to create their SSL CERT. You can even use 3rd party online websites to generate the SSL cert, meaning you don't need to run anything from the commandline. ...


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What they're really doing with this question is trying to decide which of several possible formats you want the certificate delivered in, without actually asking you. Choose Apache -- even if you aren't using Apache -- because this should get you the certificate and chain files you need, in an easily usable format for anything in AWS. This is the standard ...


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I add my sites with www and non-www versions to Google Webmaster Tools. The version you don't use won't have much in it, but is good to be able to see that. Adding both versions may show you problems that would otherwise be hard to catch. You may find that there is historical data on one or the other as well. You should only submit a site map for the ...


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In the case where you have both www and non-www verions of the site readily available (i.e, you are not using 301 redirects from www to non-www or vice versa), yes, both profiles should be created in Google Webmasters Tools (GWT). However, you should also then specify your preferred domain to GWT, so that Google doesn't treat the www and non-www versions as ...


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Is creating two different properties necessary? In this situation as you stated there are two separate entities, and you need to create two different properties. I've submitted sitemaps for both properties. Will Google give relevance to only one of them? If so which one? Google will give same relevance to both.


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A domain name is owned by you. You can take it with you when you move hosting. The IP address is owned by your hosting company. Hosting companies sometimes force IP address changes during internal switches. Use the domain name if you don't want to be tied to your host.



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