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You can solve this by using rel=canonical and then on the canonical page not lazy loading your content. The only catch with this approach is if someone visits you from a search indexed page they miss out on all the lazy loading goodness. You could also LazyLoad based on UserAgent (MSIE, Chrome, FireFox) and then Googlebot will just see the content without ...


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Your logic is incorrect. When someone requests a page (hasbang or pushstate) in the same exact tab then the request can be done via ajax and less resources are loaded. When the page is loaded in a new tab (hasbang, pushstate) then the full request cycle starts from scratch and the whole page is requested. My point is there is no difference in regards ...


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You need to have the proper meta tag for google to know that you are crawling Ajax based pages. In essence when google sees your escaped fragment they replace it with a querystring and pull that page instead. This makes your Ajax page crawlable. An alternate approach is just to use HTML history api and update the url when you make an ajax call. This way ...


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I don't really understand about javascript.In Google indexing, us the canonical url in <head> like @philtune says. But if you can't expect http://www.example.com/foo/bar to be fetched from http://www.example.com/?_escaped_fragment_=/foo/bar . Google Fetch just fetched the canonical url. In this case, the url is http://www.example.com/foo/bar, google ...


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When in doubt, use rel="canonical". This could be as simple as putting <link rel="canonical" href="http://blog.example.com/dresses/green-dresses-are-awesome" /> in your <head>. See Google for more info. This won't keep bots from crawling both "versions", but it will tell Google (and other SERPs) to only index the canonical document.



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