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8

Specifically for jQuery UI there's a MAINFEST file at http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.1/MANIFEST which includes paths relative to that file for the jQuery UI files. The CSS file in your example actually does exist. I'm seeing CSS at: http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.1/themes/base/jquery-ui.css Maybe I'm ...


7

You aren't mapping your hasbangs correctly. http://anuary.com/#!/portfolio/28 should become: http://anuary.com/?_escaped_fragment_=/portfolio/28 Also, the Google guidelines tells you that pages without hash fragments you simply include: <meta name="fragment" content="!"> Having some internal link structure and getting rid of duplicate URLs also ...


7

The best option is to have a noscript fallback to regular pagination. The search engine will pick up on the links in the noscript section and index those pages. This has the added benefit that anyone browsing your site without JavaScript enabled will get a better user experience.


6

In general any content produced dynamically through Ajax will not be crawlable s search engines do not interpret or run JavaScript. The only exception is Google which can handle dynamic JavaScript if youfollow their proposal for crawlable Ajax. A well built website will make all of its dynamic content available even if JavaScript is not available. It's ...


6

In short, no. Any request made to a URL through GET or POST can be made by anyone using any software. Actually, an AJAX request is really no different from loading the URL directly, except with the latter the returned data is displayed in the browser like a web page. This is exactly the reason why you should always validate submitted data on the server, ...


6

Make it so anyone can reach your content. This means anyone without JavaScript turned on (search engines bots, noscript users, screenreaders, etc). It's called Progressive Enhancement and should be a basic web development principle for every developer. Doing so rarely requires a lot of work as reusing the server side code to handle the Ajax requests usually ...


6

In most cases, you need to have the manual submit, even when you've utilized AJAX to submit your forms. JavaScript is not always enabled for a variety of reasons. Most text-only browsers usually don't interpret JavaScript and so it's important to have a fallback. Also, although I know it's not applicable for most forms, search engines have very limited ...


6

I would certainly recommend caching the tweets in your database or a plain text file. As soon as you start getting a lot of traffic you will be creating many hits to the Twitter API and going over their limit. And since you're not tweeting every 30 seconds day and night (I hope!) you could just end up fetching the same thing over and over. In terms of ...


6

If the content can be reached without JavaScript enabled then your question doesn't make any sense. It isn't "entirely Ajaxified" if you can get to the content through other means. Really, what you're asking is, "is it okay to enhance my user's experience through Ajax?". The answer is obviously "yes". edit Back when Google came out with its crawlable Ajax ...


5

Neither is really better than the other. It's a matter of preference for the most part. Do you want to reload the entire page, or just reload a certain portion of it. If the form is all you're showing, ajax is probably slower than reloading the page. However, if your form is just a small portion of the page, ajax would probably be faster. You can still ...


5

Check out BugMuncher. It seems like Google's Feedback system might at some point be made a service of its own, and they have a page where you can register interest. If your needs are more for things like sharing annotations rather than specifically bugs that'll require screenshots, you might have a look at CoViews.


5

check this thread in Google forums, AJAX Crawling working with hash but not meta tag. There is an issue with google Fetch tool.


5

since you asked just out of curiosity, I wanted to comment on something . you wrote that loading will take "few MS." well - this is not ALWAYS true. Depending on your target users - sometimes it can take up to 3 min !!! For example, I am right now in CHINA , which , as you know, BLOCKS twitter, facebook, youtube etc. the result : your page will have to wait ...


5

https://github.com/balupton/history.js/wiki/Intelligent-State-Handling ^ Goes into the pros AND CONS of hashed and hasbhangs URLs and provides alternative solutions


4

This isn't a true list for both Google and Microsoft, but it lists the ones Google hosts: http://scriptsrc.net/ and provides nice JS for copying the needed HTML. Google also hosts the CSS and associated images for jQuery UI at //ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.2/themes/blitzer/jquery-ui.css where blitzer is the theme name.


4

It appears to me that this is more than just a proposal - that Google is already using this protocol. I found more info here. They have enough docs and FAQs on the subject that refer to websites actually being crawled this way already... http://code.google.com/web/ajaxcrawling/ http://code.google.com/web/ajaxcrawling/docs/specification.html


4

Yes you can. It was ready to be used when it was posted. I'm not sure if other search engines use it. To be sure google does (before going through the work of setting it all up) setup a hidden link and see if google hits it .. it works on twitter https://twitter.com/?_escaped_fragment_=/username


4

In the preceeding sections on allowing AJAX content to be crawled, Google states: 3.Handle pages without hash fragments Some of your pages may not have hash fragments. For example, you might want your home page to be www.example.com, rather than www.example.com#!home. For this reason, we have a special provision for pages without hash fragments. ...


4

Cloaking is when you intentionally serve different content to search engines then to your users for the sake of manipulating the search results. That isn't the case here. Search engines seeing different content will only occur once if the cache is created and saved after the page's initial visit. And even then it will only happen if the search engine is ...


4

Section 3 of Google's documentation on crawling Ajax content declares that you use a META tag on those pages without a hash fragment: In order to make pages without hash fragments crawlable, you include a special meta tag in the head of the HTML of your page. So, if pages sometimes have them and sometimes don't, it sounds like you want to determine ...


4

PushState can be used in SEO friendly ways. Google's Matt Cutts even recommends it compared to hash bang AJAX crawl syntax: http://www.seroundtable.com/google-ajax-pushstate-vs-hashbang-16464.html One technique that works well is: Put normal URIs in the <a href=""> links Have JavaScript that intercepts clicks and loads content via AJAX and then ...


3

Vanilla has an embed plugin that works via a script tag.


3

Are you asking for a hosted forum that can be integrated into your site via JavaScript? Because it's unlikely that such a service exists. The reason that there are services like Disqus and IntenseDebate is because this content/service model makes sense for page comments. You already have a site full of content organized into pages and managed via a CMS of ...


3

Ajax content is not currently crawlable (but this may change) so if you don't make that content available to non-JavaScript enabled users, which includes search engines, it won't be reachable and thus not indexed. This is a basic accessibility issue. If your content cannot be retrieved without JavaScript enabled then your site is not very accessible. ...


3

The contents should be equivalent. Optimally, you would want to render the page using a browser exactly like a user would see it. Practically, there will always be differences, as there are differences when rendering the same page in different browsers. At any rate, there's no easy measure for "close enough" when it comes to comparing different web-pages, ...


3

Google DPF has released a new tag that supports ajax: Flexibility: The Google Publisher Tag supports all formats and devices, simplifying ad delivery to your web, mobile, and video content. The tag also supports: HTTPS Environments: Deliver ads into secure HTTPS environments. E-mail Ad Serving: Non-JavaScript tags available for use in email or other ...


3

There is no way to get Google to index/rank part of a page. It's either all or nothing. If you use crawlable Ajax it should allow your content to be indexed as separate pages as it is obvious that as the escaped fragment links change the content changes, too (that's kind of the whole point of crawlable Ajax). Of course that doesn't make it a good idea. In ...


3

Check out http://gawker.com/ - this site almost completely loads after the fact. They use "hashbangs" (http://mydomain.com/#!some_section) to determine which content page should be loaded, the main navigation stays static. Check out http://mtrpcic.net/2011/02/fragment-uris-theyre-not-as-bad-as-you-think-really/ for a short tutorial on the concept Gawker ...



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