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20

What are the consequences if a site has the same <title> tag on all the pages, reporting only the site name? You run the risk of having your pages flagged as duplicate content. The title of a web page is very important for SEO and if all of your pages have the same title you dramatically increase the chances they will be considered duplicate ...


20

Note that the website that is reached through a domain name might not be hosted directly at the root of the IP address, i.e. example.org could map to 123.45.67.89/~example. This is common for normal web hosts since they can't allocate an IP address per website – that would be incredibly wasteful. For instance, if you do a DNS lookup of ...


18

Ensure that every image has alt text. Make sure that your colour scheme is suitable for those with colour blindness. Offer a high contrast layout or large text layout for the visually impaired. Make sure your links make sense when read out of context (i.e. don't just write "click here"). Ensure your site still offers full basic functionality if the user ...


18

I'm surprised no one mentioned progressive enhancement. There's rarely a good reason to have functionality or content that requires JavaScript to work. Yes, JavaScript can make the user experience better, but it shouldn't be required to make the user experience possible. So my answer is, you should build your website so everyone can access everything, even ...


14

No, they're not. Fewer than 1% of Internet users are now on the 8-bit displays that made them necessary.


12

That depends on the site, its purpose, and who the demographic is. If you're designing a government website, a banking site, a corporate home page, etc, then you absolutely should make sure the site works without JavaScript. But if you're designing an entertainment/leisure site like Twitter or Facebook, then it's not so bad to require JavaScript. And if ...


11

Your title tag should be different on each page for at least two reasons: This is the text shown when you bookmark a page. If it is all the same and the user bookmarks several pages, then they see the same text in each bookmark. Google uses the title to know how the page is distinct from the others on your site. See Google's Search Engine Optimization ...


11

This website seems to do what you need.


10

I think the most important thing is to make sure your sizes scale no matter if the user does it through a JavaScript widget you add or through a the browsers default support. As for adding it or not, I think it depends on your targeted demographic. If you site is build for tech savvy people, I would definitely say no. If your site is built for older people ...


7

Making your mark-up semantic is a massive step towards accessibility, if your site can be navigated without any CSS being applied to it and the content makes sense then everything else is just visual gravy!


7

If you don't want to depend on a web service, Chrometric is a free AIR-based browser that lets you toggle between different forms of color blindness. It also has the advantage of working in a live browser (such as WebKit), rather than for single URLs at a time. There's also a colorblindness simulator add-on for Firefox.


6

I have spoken to someone in the Royal London Society for the Blind who works with assistive technologies regarding a project I was working on for them, and he is dead against them for the simple reason that users who need to increase font size in order to be able to read the content will not see the widget in the first place! I wouldn't waste the real ...


6

Firstly the “the disabled” means nothings! So let look at some groups of people you need to check can you’re your web site. A poor person that only has a note-book with a small screen You just need to check your website can be used when the browser window is small without too match pain. A colour blind person Can someone use your website without seeing ...


6

A title is one of most practical ways for a screen reader user to know which page they are on. Not having a title would cause major confusion for a screen reader user and it would be annoying if the screen reader kept repeating the entire URL. So, from an accessibility standpoint, the title should be in there.


6

In general, if a link only contains an image, the alt attribute of that image should not describe the image but the link target. With image maps, it’s the same. The alt attribute of the img element should describe the whole image (as the image itself is not linked). The alt attribute of the area element should describe its purpose (as this image area is ...


5

From a user experience point of view I think supplying specific titles is better because it shows more specifically what the user is seeing. This is also helpful to the user when bookmarking a page as a well formed title saves the user from having to amend the title of their bookmark. Personally I prefer to use site title - page title.


5

I think it is mandatory to have a good title on every page, for both SEO and usability. SEO: I think search engines look at the title tag from left to right in importance. And they only take a couple of words in account. Not sure if this is still the case though. Usabilty: It is nice to see what tabs you have opened in your browser. It is nice to see ...


5

The title tag is not optional. A correct HTML document must have a title tag. The title tag has quite high significance for SEO. If it contains an short and descriptive title that reflects the content of the page, your pages will definitely rate better in search engines. Your page should ideally have one h1 tag also, with a text similar to the title. That ...


5

That would not be accessible, and would actually be kind of useless. Your alt text(there's no such thing as alt tags) should describe what that particular image tag is actually presenting. Let's say your sprite has a bunch of animal icons in it. When you use it to show the sprite chunk with a cat in it, your image tag should be: <img src="animals.png" ...


4

You can use this site to get a quick overview of compliance: http://wave.webaim.org/ It performs a similar job to the old "Bobby" system that got shut down a couple of years ago.


4

I saw some really crazy graphic novel + canvas experiments from Google a while ago. All the text was plain text (great accessiblity) but all the images could be plainly seen. I can't seem to find it, but 20 Things I Learned shows kind of what I mean. I'd say that's overkill for what you want to do, so I'd do this: <img src="page1.jpg" alt="Page 1" ...


4

I like to use the <code> tag for anything code-like, hash-ish (pun), or data blocks. I use the <pre> tag for displaying direct ascii output (such as screen grabs from mainframes or art).


4

Well, I'm a developer/programmer/coding guy. This means, I always go for some information about design before answer such questions. I like Jakob Nielsen's articles, because they research before posting. http://www.useit.com/alertbox/mega-dropdown-menus.html http://www.useit.com/alertbox/navigation-menu-alignment.html ...


4

Jaws is still the most popular screen reader. According to wikipedia other popular screen readers include Window-Eyes from GW Micro, Dolphin Supernova by Dolphin, System Access from Serotek, and ZoomText Magnifier/Reader from Ai Squared are prominent examples in the English-speaking market. Wikipedia does offer a list of screen readers if none of the above ...


4

It's my understanding that we at Google don't use any of the language meta-information within PDF files. You can, however, use the hreflang information via HTTP header or Sitemaps file for non-HTML content too.


4

Especially if you have a shared hosting or a server of your own hosting multiple domains you can't access the "website" via IP. For your own server you could possibly define a primary domain that is reached if you enter the IP. For shared hosts that is impossible. As mentioned by @Ijacqu the IP could easily change. Another thing is duplicate content, so ...


4

The original version of HTTP did not include any mechanism for the client to specify the host name as part of the request. It connected to the server and sent only the path portion of the URL. One of the early modifications to the HTTP protocol was to add the ability for the client to send other "header" information, including the host name. 20 years ...


3

HTML has a longdesc attribute that points to the URL of a 'long description'. Rather than lots of alt tags, why not use that?


3

Browsers ought to have the option to enable tooltips on focus, but since they don't you can do it via JavaScript: Onfocus tooltips.


3

Aside from space issues and the ease of scanning, there are a few other factors you should take into account: Horizontally-arranged menus (of horizontally arranged languages) means more mouse movement to get from one item to the next. However, it will be easier to go from a top-level menu item in a horizontal menu to its corresponding dropdown menu than it ...



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