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You do not want to do a 301 redirect to a 404 page. The 404 HTTP response tells the user-agent (browser, search engine, etc) that the requested document cannot be found. If you send a 301 HTTP response then they will think the document has moved to the new location which is your 404 page. That is not accurate. When you encounter a page not found send the ...


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When Google Webmaster tool return a 404 status code: When you remove a page from your site, think about whether that content is moving somewhere else, or whether you no longer plan to have that type of content on your site. When moving content to a new URL, redirect the old URL to the new URL—that way when users come to the old URL looking for that ...


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In descending order of preference, I would suggest the following options: Make the incorrect URLs return 301 redirects to the correct ones. If practical, this is by far the best solution. It will let Google update its index, and it will take any visitor stumbling across one of those URLs (e.g. from an outdated Google search result) directly to the page ...


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Q1: The URLs of the 404 pages in the Webmaster Tools all bear the mistake and will never be available at the new site. I marked them as fixed in the tools. Do I need to do something about that, like 301 rewrite them with a condition to fix the error? Its a better idea to make 301 redirect from 404 pages to the related pages of the new website. So users will ...


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Q1: The URLs of the 404 pages in the Webmaster Tools all bear the mistake and will never be available at the new site. I marked them as fixed in the tools. Do I need to do something about that, like 301 rewrite them with a condition to fix the error? You might want to redirect them to a page telling users these pages are not available anymore, rather than ...



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