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When Google Webmaster tool return a 404 status code: When you remove a page from your site, think about whether that content is moving somewhere else, or whether you no longer plan to have that type of content on your site. When moving content to a new URL, redirect the old URL to the new URL—that way when users come to the old URL looking for that ...


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In descending order of preference, I would suggest the following options: Make the incorrect URLs return 301 redirects to the correct ones. If practical, this is by far the best solution. It will let Google update its index, and it will take any visitor stumbling across one of those URLs (e.g. from an outdated Google search result) directly to the page ...


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Q1: The URLs of the 404 pages in the Webmaster Tools all bear the mistake and will never be available at the new site. I marked them as fixed in the tools. Do I need to do something about that, like 301 rewrite them with a condition to fix the error? Its a better idea to make 301 redirect from 404 pages to the related pages of the new website. So users will ...


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Q1: The URLs of the 404 pages in the Webmaster Tools all bear the mistake and will never be available at the new site. I marked them as fixed in the tools. Do I need to do something about that, like 301 rewrite them with a condition to fix the error? You might want to redirect them to a page telling users these pages are not available anymore, rather than ...


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The semantically correct HTTP response code for this situation would be 403 Forbidden: The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make public why the request has not been fulfilled, it ...


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The correct code would be 401 Not Authorized As per the HTTP specifications 10.4.2 401 Unauthorized The request requires user authentication. The response MUST include a WWW-Authenticate header field (section 14.47) containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Authorization header ...


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Since this is a page for administrators, with or without the "key" parameter, the pages can't and should not be indexed. Therefore the webpage for non-admin can send 404 status code, and you can leave the same URL intact. Do not redirect, since you tell Google that the page has moved, but then to a page that doesn't exist. This is how Google does it as ...


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I found that you don't have to specify favicon. just paste it to the root folder and it will sometimes automatically add it. You can specify favicon just in case for new browsers. The root folder is the best place to place favicon's, just a suggestion. Best regards.


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Some bots and older browsers Some bots and older browsers will ignore custom favicon paths and will attempt to fetch a locally stored favicon from the root /. A simple fix would be to copy the favicon from the CDN and store it locally on the site just to satisfy those bots and browsers, you could also setup a redirect using something like redirect 301 ...


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You can't check for the query string using the RewriteRule pattern (the query string is stripped before pattern matching, as is the hostname, etc). So, the rules you stated above simply won't match and you'll get a 404. However, you can use the RewriteCond directive to check the query string: For example: domain.tld/en/abc.php?foo to ...



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