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11

302 redirects aren't bad for SEO as they are probably the most common redirect in use today. In fact, PHP's header() function sends the 302 HTTP response by default. Here's what Matt Cutts had to say about 302 redirects. Basically they are fine and Google will find and index those links properly. It looks like Google will show the original URL instead of or ...


4

Googlebot may have issues using session ID cookies so you must not rely on them. You need distinct pages for each language and I recommend that you switch to foo.com/en/bar format but if you must use the querystring then add code to alter every anchor <a> tag on the page to dynamically include the language parameter based on the presence of the ...


4

If it's temporary, then you should use a temporary solution! A 301 tells the search engine that the page has moved, permanently. As a result, search engines will remove your main page from the index and index the new page instead. I can't tell how long it might take for search engines to do this, but it shouldn't be a long time. On the other hand, a 302 ...


4

This should do the trick: header("HTTP/1.0 302 Moved Temporarily"); header("Location: example.com/whatever"); header("Cache-Control: private"); header("Vary: User-Agent, Accept-Encoding"); exit; The recommendation for the Vary header is from this google developer page about optimizing caches (and problems with some IE < 9). Background on caching ...


3

While Will is correct that the retry-after value is optional, I'd suggest setting it anyway as a matter of practice. Setting the value has the benefit of being unambiguous. A 503 without retry-after "should be handled as a 500." If any crawler/script/etc. requesting the documents has been configured to treat 500 differently, then you can't be entirely ...


3

That kind of borders on cloaking and could get you dinged or even banned from Google. What you might think about doing is for first time users having your home page with all of the information and a big "Get Started" button and if they return use a cookie to identify they user and redirect them to http://domain.com/abcde.


3

302 Caching A 302 response code would only be cached if accompanied with the Cache-Control or Expires headers. There is no explicit or embedded cache information within a 302 response. According to RFC 2616, section 10.3.3 302 Found The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection might be altered on occasion, ...


2

If you want to redirect example.com => www.example.com (or vice versa), then use a 301. If you want to redirect the root URL to an internal path, www.example.com => www.example.com/general/index then use a 302. The internal redirection isn't necessary a bad practice. Sometimes CMS impose this redirect because the CMS package needs to be installed in ...


2

If you are always redirecting to the SSL site, then a 301 would fit … but you might as well just change the URL you link to instead of redirecting.


2

A 303 See Other may be the most appropriate in this scenario.


2

Change the 302 to a 301, my guess is the temporary redirect is confusing Google and causing it to keep both page's data.


2

I don't know why the redirects aren't being detected correctly if you are certain that they were implemented correctly, but in general I have seen Webmaster Tools take awhile to drop old URLs off of various reports, so I would wait a bit to see if the problem goes away. Check the cache dates in Google search results for some of those pages; it's possible ...


2

Well, I'm going to stick my neck out and say it's impossible to determine, with a degree of accuracy, the difference between an incoming link and a redirect, or to specifically determine whether it was a redirect and not some other kind of request. As far as the target website is concerned, it receives the same HTTP request whether it is as a result of a ...


2

The Retry-After header is optional. It if is specified, then it helps search engines determine when it's appropriate to crawl your site again.


2

It sounds like you've answered your own question. As per Google's documentation, the redirection method doesn't matter, though I must say I too would lean towards using 302 – as your colleague says, both URLs are valid and using 302 is common in other conditional redirect scenarios. However doing either without using Google's recommended Vary and ...


2

As precised in the Google specification, you could use 302 redirection (but not 301) when they call you with ?_escaped_fragment_= to provide them the content. The problem I could see in your implementation is that, maybe, your HTML files contains some links that are relative to the redirected page or that point directly to others HTML files. For example if ...


2

By applying redirect from your home page to a random post, you can confuse visitors. For example and especially when visitors click on a link like www.example.com (your home page URL), they expect see your home page, not a post. Moreover, you can also confuse Googlebot and other search engines bots (and thus SEO) if the home page is always redirected to a ...


2

503 everything is the best strategy I can think of, together with a retry after HTTP header. Source: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.co.il/2011/01/how-to-deal-with-planned-site-downtime.html


2

The type of redirect you are using is not the problem. 301 redirects are cacheable. In fact they are extremely hard to cache bust. 301 means "permanent" and browsers are very likely to cache 301 redirects with no way with the server to undo one that is already cached. 302 redirects are generally not cached by default unless other headers indicate that ...


1

I would recommend creating a home page that describes what your site is and how to use it. Users would have to click a button like "new document" to create a text editor. This is how a similar site that I use works: http://collabedit.com/ The SEO advantages are: Search engine bots don't get 302 redirects There is content on your home page that lets you ...


1

Session probably isn't a good choice for this for the reasons you mentioned. Also consider that some users might have cookies disabled, so they would have the same problem as bots. Instead I'd suggest just adding a query string variable to the global home link, something like /?region=global. If that variable is present in the URL you don't do the redirect. ...


1

I suggest using a custom 404 page with internal links to the most useful pages of your site, like the homepage, search and maybe the main topic page of the page the user requested (if your content is structured like this). If you can also offer content similar to the requested, deleted page, then maybe links to those pages are useful for the visitor as ...


1

If i redirect that website to mainwebsite.com/productA1/ will, will productA1.com be indexed by search engines? If you redirect (301 or 302) productA1.com to mainwebsite.com/productA1/ then productA1.com won't appear in the SERPs. If productA1.com previously appeared in the SERPs for it's own content (it wasn't a brand new site) then it would pass link ...


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There are not legality issues. Here is how it it breaks down: From SEO Perspective All content on Site.com affects the score. So Site.com/User/Frank affects the score of site.com. frank.site.com is treated by Google as a separate site. Gets its own Google page rank. So here is the rule. If you are running something you want indexed separately then use ...


1

This is a pretty challenging problem from an SEO standpoint and I'm not sure there is a pure best practices SEO way to handle it in it's current form. The way you are running things I don't believe you can get Google to show Germain results, Google will only show the German results if it has the German content, as you've discovered (based on what you ...


1

However, the change would have broken existing links. So, nicely, they stuck in 302 redirects. Well, the important bit here is that the change would have broken existing links. /commerce/product_info.php?products_id=9266 isn't the location of the product page anymore, /products/9266 is. It's not at all unreasonable to expect the old-style links to stop ...


1

Note: You'll get a better answer to this by emailing team@stackoverflow.com, they handle questions and issues with the validator. IMHO sparkfun have done the wrong thing SEO wise by using a 302, it should be a 301 (see "SEO: ecommerce item deleted by user, 301 redirect to HOME PAGE or 404 not found?"). At a complete guess perhaps the stack bot regards a ...


1

As far as I can tell from Google's relevant documentation, as long as the content served up is in fact static and does not re-direct based on whether it's a robot or a human being that's viewing the page, there shouldn't be a problem with the /snapshot/yourfilename/ thing. On the other hand, I don't see why you cannot use URL-rewrite in .htaccess or the ...


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Here's some advice from Google's Webmaster Central Blog: Working with multilingual websites, 19 Mar 2010 New markup for multilingual content, 5 Dec 2011 Basically, what you propose seems like a perfectly fine way to set up a multilingual site. The most important thing is to make sure that each translated version of a page has a unique URL, and that all ...


1

The support folks for the Wordpress theme I'm using (ProPhotoBlogs) gave me a hint that worked: There's a feature that prevents images from being copied/saved/dragged in the browser. They said for me to turn it off, which I did and then the links started working again. That feature must have been the culprit. Curiously, when I turned that feature back on, ...



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