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1

See my answer here: Would my SEO be impacted if I migrated posts from Tumblr to a hosted WordPress solution? In short I would make sure you fill out the Change of Address form in WMT (https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/83106?hl=en) and you resubmit your sitemap from your old site (so Google picks up the 301's), then submit the sitemap for the new ...


2

This may not really be an answer to your question, but the best way to make a multilingual is in most cases by using some simple PHP. Create a folder called languages and create the files lang.code.php. Replace code with, for example EN for English, DE for German, etc. Create a language switcher with the following code: <?php $lang = "en"; if( isset( ...


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As far as I know, there is no specific needs to put your files on root. If you think your users will get benefited with this practice, go for it. My Suggestion: Keep your default language on your root domain. For example your main target audience is En, keep English version at root. For other language, create sub-folders.


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I believe this will start you off right: I don't believe the rewrite rule is necessary, when the default page for WordPress is index.php Options +FollowSymLinks RewriteEngine on Redirect 301 ^/home.html http://www.mscaspian.com/fa Update Localizing WordPress List of Localization Plug-Ins I am not affiliated in any way to the list of plug-ins ...


2

Google takes several things in account to determine how relevant a page is. The most important factors are: Page content Domain name URL name Let's assume that your content and your domain name didn't change. Even your HTML markup is still the same. OLD example.com/category/subcategory.html NEW example.com/category/filter/cat/subcategory.html By ...


0

There are two options for you here: Serve the URLs with a 404 and 410. This way, you are informing the world (and google) that those pages are gone. If there are links to those pages, this step would make sure that you loose any page rank and traffic you got from those links. However, since you already mentioned that those pages were having duplicate ...


0

If your old domain has bad links and passing negative value to the new domain you should not use 301 redirects. The main purpose of the 301 redirection is to pass all link juice of old domain to the new domain. If your website has bad links and you want to live a new domain why do you want to redirect the old to new? You have a benefit to start working in a ...


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None of the bad links point to newdomain.com, and I worry that a disavow request via this domain in Webmaster Tools will damage something. Do the old band links affect the new site? If so, where do I disavow those old bad links? On Webmaster Tools for the new domain? Yes, old bad links affect the new site via redirects. Disavowing on the new domain won't ...


1

All of these answers are correct. However, there is something you are missing. One overlooked aspect of redirecting from an old domain to a new domain is that the new domain must begin to stand on it's own at some point. As long as the 301 redirects remain, you will continue to benefit from the old domain. However, if the 301 redirects begin to fail, ...


0

Yes I am agree with Jverstry. Google will definitely detect your website. And the problem of "Not Found". Please check your redirection method. If there is any problem then resolve it. And if not then i suggest you should again make redirection and check. If your previous site have good rank in search engine then don't worry your new site will rank well. But ...


1

Yes, Google will detect these redirects over time for sure. But domain authority is a Moz concept (and it will detect redirects too). They update DA every couple of weeks. Hence, you are going to have to wait for the next updates to see the impact. Remember that DA has no impact on Google rankings. When you use 301 redirects, you loose a bit of link juice. ...


1

The change will be detected by Google, don't worry about that. Moreover, like you applied 301 redirects in a correct way (each old pages to new ones), you would get your domain authority back. You just need to wait a little bit in order to let Google discover these redirects. It's hard to say when because nobody knows when Google bots will find links to ...


0

301ing will allow you to keep all traffic whilst the search engines re-index, so that is the most important to do. This should be on all pages, not just any that have links. Personally, I think Option 2 would make for a good signal that the links are still relevant (not, for example, someone buying and 301ing a site just for page rank). However, Google ...


2

If your .htaccess has RewriteRules like these: RewriteRule page.html /another-page.html [NC,R=301,L] It will always remove querystring parameters, that's default behaviour. You'll have to add QSA flag to your RewriteRule, like this: RewriteRule page.html /another-page.html [NC,QSA,R=301,L] Apache mod_rewrite doc QSA|qsappend


2

Google states the following with regard to redirects: If you do a site: search for a page that is redirected, you'll see the redirected URL in the results. This is normal. For example, say that www.example.com has been redirected to www.redirectedexample.com. Doing a search for site:www.example.com will return results from www.redirectedexample.com. ...


2

My answers: Search engines bots are web crawlers (like your web browser in some way) and when a 301 redirect is thrown, they are notified. Therefore, they follow the new redirect to reach the new page and know the PageRank must be transferred. If the 301 redirect is up, search engines don't crawl a.html anymore, that's why after a long time, they remove ...


1

As it stands, you are redirecting to the same host. ie. demo.example.com/file is redirecting to demo.example.com/my-demo/file, not example.com/my-demo/file, which is going to result in a redirect loop. You need to specify an absolute URL in the RewriteRule substitution: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} =demo.example.com RewriteRule ^(.*)$ ...


3

In my personal opinion, I would say it won't harm your SEO. As internal pages, you can have a good reason for doing all these redirects, for example: removing a module of your site stop selling a category of products ... That's why I think search engines can't penalize your site for this. However, think about applying these redirects to a relevant page ...


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If it's not a ServerAlias but a subdomain, remember to put your .htacces file in the subdomain, not in the main domain directory. Also add "RewriteEngine On" in .htaccess if you did not yet.


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Do you have an ServerAlias demo.example.com for the VirtualHost that has this RewriteRule? If you don't, that is the reason it doesn't work.


2

Edit 2 Based on @w3d comment and more information provided by Mayeenul: Replace your regex: RewriteRule ^[0-9]+/([^/]+/[^/]+/?)$ /$1 [L,R=301,NE] with this one: Add this new rule: RewriteRule ^([^/]+)/([^/]+)/page/[0-9]+/?$ /$1/$2/ [R=301,L] So your .htaccess should look like: # BEGIN WordPress <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> RewriteEngine On ...


0

This would depend on what your host will allow. It is certainly possible to point your DNS record for a subdomain to a different web host entirely. In that case you would certainly be able to use a separate account. You host may or may not have the ability to have two accounts for the same customer and distinguish which one should have which subdomain ...


1

First of all I would like to ask you that why are you using redirection again and again? This is a very bad practice in the eye of Google. May be Google needs some time to understand what is the actual page you want to rank for. When all the link juice will transfer to urlC from urlA and urlB, may be the issue will be resolved. Found this for your help: ...


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You can use a mod_alias redirect. If using Apache 2.2.6+ then: Redirect 301 /blog-domain-name /blog Everything after /blog-domain-name is appended onto the end of the destination URL, no wildcard is necessary. On earlier versions of Apache you will need to specify an absolute destination URL: Redirect 301 /blog-domain-name http://example.com/blog ...


3

Something similar to the rewrite rules from Jon Lin's StackOverflow answer to Remove Characters from URL with htaccess should solve your problem. I would use this which should rewrite the URL to not have the characters, and then redirect: RewriteRule ^(.*)\'(.*)$ /$1$2 [L] RewriteRule ^(.*)\’(.*)$ /$1$2 [L] RewriteCond %{ENV:REDIRECT_STATUS} 200 ...


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302 Caching A 302 response code would only be cached if accompanied with the Cache-Control or Expires headers. There is no explicit or embedded cache information within a 302 response. According to RFC 2616, section 10.3.3 302 Found The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection might be altered on occasion, ...



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