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RewriteRule ^login$ /login.php? [L,R=301] You need to remove the ? on the end of the RewriteRule substitution. This is effectively creating an empty query string, removing anything that is passed in the request. RewriteRule ^login$ /login.php [L,R=301]


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The canonical link type is not supported by all user agents, and even if a user agent supports the canonical link type, it may decide to ignore it, so users would end up on the "wrong" URL. So a 301 redirect is preferable. This is also the recommendation of the canonical RFC: Before adding the canonical link relation, verification of the following is ...


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"Why not both?" But more serious, you want them both. Use 301 to correct searchengines, and use canonical to indicate preference. The 301 is the most important one, since that also tell SE's that you dont use the trailing slash url, but the one without.


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No its not same. Google will count img01231 as <ALT> or <title> name for new image. Basically 301 redirect passes link juice not such things.


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Its a slightly longer process that the 3 options you've suggested, although still doable. Blogspot won't allow 301 redirects, so you can't simply redirect the whole site + link juice. You will need to tell Google that the duplicate content (i.e. your new site - assuming you have copied all content over already) is the most relevant. You do this using the ...


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RewriteRule ^test-music\.html$ /music/ [L,R=301]


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Very easy, this is something you can easily find and figure out yourself. # Check if the url STARTS WITH (is what the ^ does) '/test-music' RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/test-music # redirect it, 301 style, Last line (we go away, no need to do the rest of the htaccess) RewriteRule ^(.*) /music/ [L,R=301]


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It takes weeks for Google and other search engines to de-index pages and even longer for a website, which would in time would hurt your rankings. The only thing you need to do is return a status 503 rather than a 301 to 404. This is the definition of the 503 status code from the RFC that defines these status codes: The server is currently unable to ...


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So you're telling us the page does not exist (for mobile users)? That means it should be a 404 redirect. The 301 means that the page has moved, but it simply doesn't exist.


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You say you are getting a message about faulty redirect, so not why you think that means duplicate content? Google are pretty clear about redirecting smart phone users if there isn't a matching page Faulty redirects A faulty redirect occurs when a desktop page incorrectly redirects smartphone users to a smartphone page not relevant to their query. ...



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