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Should there be a 301 redirect to the canonical link on all pages with any kind of old format URL, or will the rel="canonical" and domain change request be enough to tell Google to drop the indexing of the old ones and start indexing the specified canonical URLs instead? Google treats rel="canonical" as hints that a page is substantially duplicate to ...


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(1) With this approach, is there any drawback/impact on search engine indexing and bot crawling? You might get an advantage for using HTTP/2.0 due to its ability to multiplex data over the network instead of a head-of-line blocking. Info is here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP/2#Differences_from_HTTP_1.1 and here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head-of-...


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1) No because it's the same content and only the protocol has changed. You may notice a temporary dip as Google discovers the change and updates its indexes but it will go back to what it was before. 2) Not with a redirect. Service resources will increase somewhat because you would be encrypting your data. Otherwise, no.


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If you have to ask the question then you should not be using a 301 redirect. There is no way out once you add a 301 on your site. Actually http/2 does not require ssl, but there are no implementations I am aware of which allow for non-ssl requests. As to the questions you asked....compared to what? Leaving it as is? Using a 302? Yes Google say http2 will ...


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If you do 301 redirect in this case, you should canonicalise the original page and the duplicate and pick one over the other. This tells Google, this is the main page and ignore the others. <link rel="canonical" href="example.com/tag/url" /> Add that to both pages, href should be which ever page you want to be the original.


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Tags in wordpress are keywords assigned to posts to help with the internal search of Wordpress. However, wordpress is smart enough to detect posts based on the actual content. So tags are technically not required. Moreover, in addition to the problem you've described, tags in posts create additional URLs like example.com/tag/url which leeches off the ...


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This isn't a duplicate content problem per se. You are not being penalized, right? What's happening is the algorithm is functioning as expected. Two different pages are ranking for some search, but because these are archives you aren't being assessed the duplicate content penalty. I'm willing to bet no one said Google wouldn't index both if it thought these ...


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Once you start using Adsense, they detect that you have placed the ad code on the specific page you sent when signing up, they will automatically review your entire site (not just the page that you submitted in your application) From my personal experience It doesn't matter if you change some of your website content while you are awaiting for the ...


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You'll need to use mod_rewrite (as opposed to a mod_alias Redirect) and check the HTTP_HOST server variable (which tells you which site has been accessed). Something like the following at the top of your .htaccess file: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^(www\.)?website1\.com$ [NC] RewriteRule ^example/(.*)$ http://www.website2.com/example/$1 [R=302,...


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The 301 redirect is considered a permanent redirect, and clients (browsers, search engines, etc.) are entitled to take the response and cache that. For example if you open Chrome and the network tab of its developer tools and request the page for House A, and Chrome receives a 301 to House B, you would see the request for both pages in the traffic. If you ...


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My current solution is to use the RedirectPermanent directive The RedirectPermanent (mod_alias) directive is prefix matching so, as you have found, you will be redirected to the "corresponding path" on the newdomain. However, the complementary mod_alias directive RedirectMatch matches using a regex and will allow you to redirect all URLs to the single ...


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I think this should do the trick for you. On the old domain, put this code in the .htaccess file (this assumes a 301 redirect is used). RewriteEngine On RewriteRule (.*) https://newdomain.example [R=301,L]


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I really don't know what exactly you are trying to do with this, but the method that you are using here is safe. Do not try to fool google with any snicky redirect, because they can track your activity from webmaster and the crawling. Be genuine.


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Whatever you are doing is against the Google guideline. But lets jump to the answer. The best way would be redirecting it to the main website. The only problem with this is, after redirecting your website, you will start losing SERP position for the mirror website. Google will keep only one website in the ranking. so it is better to understand which website ...


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Creating multiple identical websites and linking back from them to the main website is nothing but an aggressive attempt to web spam and influence the ranks of the main website. With Google rolling out Penguin and Panda updates, it's only a matter of time that all the websites (including the primary one) is nailed by Google for a violation of their quality ...


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It's fine. The 301 code is exactly appropriate for the situation you describe.


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It is possible that many or all of those sessions are coming from analytics spammers. Spammers have realized that they can inject data into your Google Analytics without ever even visiting the site. They simply make calls directly to Google's tracking scripts reporting that they have visited your site (even though they never have). They often do this ...


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The line is drawn at one redirect. There should be at most one redirect. In your case, that means if house A is out and house B and C are out but house D is still active, rather than going from A to B, B to C, then C to D, you would simply redirect the "link juice" from A to D for these reasons: It places less load on the server. Only one extra request ...


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Google has a long held position that 301 links are fine and very appropriate for many situations. They pass page rank and most sites rely on them for a host of reasons like: 1) page url was update to new url 2) Company was acquired and all their urls now redirect to cooresponding urls on acquirers website 3) Total site redesign in which all urls changed. ...


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Using mod_rewrite in the .htaccess file in the document root: RewriteEngine On RewriteRule ^(.+/)?old-(.*) /$1$2 [R=301,L] This will handle old- files in the document root and anywhere on the filesystem (not explicitly stated in your question, but the other answers assume these files are all located in the document root). It assumes that abc.php is in the ...


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In Firefox and Opera, the cache of 301 redirects is stored separately from the traditional cookie jar. By storing a cookie string in a 301 redirected url, you can effectively keep the same cookies for users even if the cookies are cleared. The current implementation of 301 redirect caching in Firefox and Opera allows for tracking of users who may ...


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The idea isn't bad, but you must know that a domain won't give you a high position on Google by itself - these times are over :( Next you should acquire links to your site on other sites with the link text "new entertainment". The most important thing is that the links must be placed on normal sites (not some directories with viagra and other mess) with ...


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Do a 301 redirect. In your case Google won't see it as Black Hat. The only way to get a "Black Hat" mark with a 301 is when you're doing "chain redirection" (i.e. you're redirecting from a first to a second to a third domain etc.). In the situation you've described, there won't be any penalty for this redirection.


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301 redirect from the same domain is not blackhat SEO at all. because you are redirecting form the same domain even if there are many pages, also the page rank will flow from the old pages to new ones. This is the best way for your case.



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