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You're probably right that search engines could have trouble identifying the right pages if the sitemap can't be edited, so only the old URLs will be listed there, not the new ones. If you can add new pages & create redirects, then this might be your best solution: Create your new pages Redirect (301) to them from the old URLs Create a new sitemap ...


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You're thinking right. Use 301 redirects from the old pages to the new pages. I'd recommend advertising only the new URLs in your sitemap that point to actual webpages with content people can see. It is not necessary to advertise the old URLs since Google automatically follows redirects. Eventually, Google will only index the new URLs and remove the old ...


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1) Correct. You only really need to add the non-www version. Google treats www and non-www as separate websites. Same goes for http or https (if that is a factor for you). https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/34592?hl=en 2) See the article above for why you'd need a separate website. The main reason, from that article, is that "Search Console data ...


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For Q1: Provided your redirect from www.example.com to example.com forces all requests to be redirected and doesn't just apply to your root folder for example, then you will not need to add www.example.com to your Webmaster Tools as a property. For Q2: This feature of Webmaster Tools is more helpful for setting a preference between SSL and non-SSL versions ...


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If your canonical tag points to the URL with the extension then is what search engines will cache and index. So the URL with the extension will be in the search results. But you have to ask yourself this, If search engines cannot see any internal links with the exception of the canonical URL on your site, what value would they place on a page if the site ...


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Using .htaccess You do this with a simple .htaccess rule by detecting the browsers Accept-Language (read here). RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{HTTP:Accept-language} ^en-GB [NC] RewriteRule ^$ https://example.co.uk [L,R=301] Using PHP You can do this with a programming language to perform a lookup (I generally use a 3rd party open API) then send the 301 ...


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Your best option is probably to verify using DNS. This will work no matter what sort of redirects you have in place. It also doesn't require you to keep up with any special redirect rules. According to Google's help page, you should: On the Search Console Home page, click the Manage Site button next to the site you want, and then click Verify this ...


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Try this: RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/mygooglefile.txt$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [R=301,L] Of course you will need to change the file name and the target domain name.


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The TL;DR answer: 301 redirect - Tech version of "Hello, I no longer use /requested-url, instead I use /this-new-url. Please update your information accordingly." Canonical - Say to the bots: "Hi. For this page, I prefer /this-url as url. If you've indexed this page with another url, please disregard that one and use this one.


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RewriteRule ^login$ /login.php? [L,R=301] You need to remove the ? on the end of the RewriteRule substitution. This is effectively creating an empty query string, removing anything that is passed in the request. RewriteRule ^login$ /login.php [L,R=301]


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The canonical link type is not supported by all user agents, and even if a user agent supports the canonical link type, it may decide to ignore it, so users would end up on the "wrong" URL. So a 301 redirect is preferable. This is also the recommendation of the canonical RFC: Before adding the canonical link relation, verification of the following is ...


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"Why not both?" But more serious, you want them both. Use 301 to correct searchengines, and use canonical to indicate preference. The 301 is the most important one, since that also tell SE's that you dont use the trailing slash url, but the one without.



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