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I read way back about having multiple redirects and how you can have a maximum of 3 recommended by Search Engines, is just that this was my first time setting up these 2 redirects at the same time. Thank you all for your inputs, I am less worried now for sure.


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Whatever redirection tool you are using is probably bad. webpagetest.org can show you how well your redirects work. Just put in the first page (not the redirected page) and the first entry in the list of URL's the simulated web browser tried accessing will be shown in yellow to indicate a redirect, then the line following it will be the new URL. Google can ...


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Search engines will follow multiple redirects as situations like yours are not uncommon. So having two redirects won't be an issue. (This also happens when users use URL shortners, or worse, chain them together which can happen when multiple parties want to track users). But there is an upper limit to how many redirects a search engines will follow. I know ...


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I'd recommend expanding on your tree. So far, you're on a good start with the first resort: www.domain.co.uk/resort-name-a/guide www.domain.co.uk/resort-name-a/nightlife etc. Now when you want to add another resort, use a similar structure: www.domain.co.uk/resort-name-b/guide www.domain.co.uk/resort-name-b/nightlife etc. Every time you add a resort, ...


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Google treats every variation of the query string as a separate URL. When the parameters differ they are technically different URLs. It is appropriate to use 301 permanent redirects because you are redirecting different URLs. Keeping the utc parameters on the URL after the redirect is important for Google Analytics. It will only be able to use them ...


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By default the query string on the requested URL is appended to the rewritten/redirected URL. The easiest way to remove the query string from the redirected URL is to simply append a ? at the end of the RewriteRule substitution. This essentially writes a blank query string (the ? does not actually become part of the rewritten URL). So, from your example: ...


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It seems that there is some mistakes in your regex. Have you tried like bellow : RedirectMatch 301 ^products/manufacturers\.php?&l=(.*)$ / EDIT: Is products/manufacturers\.php a real page of your site ? Otherwise you could use RewriteEngine on RewriteRule ^products/manufacturers\.php(.*)$ / [L,R=301] Tell me if it works


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You could set an environment variable in the RewriteRule directive and set the Cache-Control header conditionally based on the presence of this environment variable... RewriteRule ^section$ /newsection [NC,L,R=302,E=cachesection:1] Header always set Cache-Control "max-age=86400" env=cachesection ...to cache the "temporary" redirect for 1 day.


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It's a good idea to redirect example.com to www.example.com. Because you can't use a CNAME for example.com's DNS record, which greatly reduces your options for things like load balancing and resilience.


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Your htaccess is fine and mabye working, but the correct way is this: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^old-domain\.com$ [OR] RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www\.old-domain\.com$ RewriteRule ^(.*)$ "http\:\/\/www\.new-domain\.com\/$1" [R=301,L] Because google will chek both www and non www protocols. Once you make this change, please chek it if works fine with this ...


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Your .htaccess actually looks OK, and you say the redirection is working OK for you. The only possibility is that if Google is requesting the www subdomain? In this case, Google would not see the redirect since you are specifically checking for the bare domain. Since your old-domain is a separate hosting account then your directives can be simplified (ie. ...


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First, make sure you set your preferred site(s) to HTTPS mode in GWT. This may require you to make a new property and re-verify it. Now once it's looking for SSL mode, hit the sidebar and nav to "Crawl > robots.txt Tester". You should see a field at the bottom that starts with https://yoursite.com followed by a text box and red "TEST" button. You should ...


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The best way to determine why Google can't access a page (including robots.txt) is to use the fetch as Google feature in Google Webmaster Tools. Log into Google Webmaster Tools Select your site (Make sure you have it registered with the https://) Navigate to "Crawl" -> "Fetch as Google" Enter /robots.txt in the text box Click the "Fetch" button Google ...



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