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22

You can't redirect your old sites without losing 90% of their value and risking a penalty on your new site. There usually isn't a huge cost to leaving old sites up and running. You could use them to advertise your new site. Put a banner about your new site on every page of your old sites.


11

First, something that's implied in other answers, but should probably be spelled out: the situation you describe is something Google actively wants to discourage -- you're not "collateral damage" in their fight against spammers, you are their intended target in their fight against irrelevant and 'deceptive' results. ('Deceptive' in the sense that you think ...


5

Bad Idea! Never, I repeat NEVER do that. I tried that 3 days ago and after couple of days the site to which I redirected completely lost all its rankings. Not even it was ranking on searching domain.com in Google. All indexed pages are still there but the site lost its ranking completely. I can provide the links of the sites as proof but that's not allowed ...


4

One thing that all your sites have in common is you. Why not throw a designed by link at the bottom of your site that links to your "portfolio" where your new business is prominently displayed.


4

301 Redirects are completely fine if they're real. If you had an old site and then decided to move/combine it with some other related site, there's absolutely no problem putting up a 301 redirect on the old site to send users to the new site. You should not be penalized for this in Google and if you are, they're completely reasonable about fixing it if you ...


4

The best thing to do is not worry about the traffic to your old sites. I had a good friend who graduated from Harvard Business. He told stories about how Harvard drummed into his head the mantra of "Know when to cut your losses." every day one way or another. From a business perspective, this is excellent advice! It is good advice in life too!! You are ...


2

http://www.example.com/oldpage.html#7 redirects to http://www.example.com/product7 From a technical point of view, you are not going to be able to "301 redirect" from /oldpage.html#7 to /product7, since the fragment identifier #7 is not sent to the server, so you can't respond with a 301 status based on this information. The best you can do is issue a ...


2

Yes, sort of. Put yourself in the visitors shoes (with google at their back) and ask how you can introduce your new content to them in a relevant way. ie old site is about say hiking and new one is about music recording services add content to the hiking site aimed at say hikers who like to bring their guitars along on hikes to play encouraging them to ...


1

For all, who means to be affected from the same issue: Google, specially on actualization of the web gui of search console, needs time. It fetchs data from different data centers, caches etc. so it could happen, that your changes aren't shown in the search console for a pretty long piece of time. But, the solution is: after you checked your implementations ...


1

RewriteRule ^$ /temp [L] If you have a physical directory temp in the root of your filesystem... and since you have omitted the slash from the end of the RewriteRule substitution then mod_dir will attempt to "fix" the request by appending a slash. It does this by issueing a 301 redirect. (You are then presumably relying on the DirectoryIndex to serve the ...


1

Maybe try something like this: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^oldsite.com$ RewriteRule ^/?unchanged/url - [L,QSA] RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^(www\.)?newsite.com$ RewriteRule ^(/?specific/page) http://newsite.com/$1 [R=301,L] RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^(www\.)?newsite.com$ RewriteRule ^ http://newsite.com/ [R=301,L] The order is the important part. First, ...


1

Before removing the old domain redirect to the new site, I would double check which are the website main traffic sources. If there are relevant links in other websites pointing to the old domain, then it could make sense to keep the old domain or consider if losing it is just fine.


1

If there are no major links pointing to foo.com or if the site doesn't get too much of direct traffic, then you can safely let it go.


1

No, a noindex isn't necessary. The canonical link element should ensure that only the canonical version is returned in search results – so no duplicates – and will benefit from "ranking signals" of the canonicalised (i.e. variant) pages. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/139066?hl=en


1

This is actually quite a common practice, be careful though, while it is perfectly acceptable to do this for common mis-speellings of your own domain name to keep your competitors from grabing them as well as your own domain name under multiple TLD's. Where you will encounter problems is with Cyber Squatting. This is where you are registering, trafficking ...



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