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I need to use content from a testimonials page of another site, but I don't want to be caught for duplicate content.

Is there something I can do to tell google that the div where the content is is using content from another external page?

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

When using content from other sites you can use <blockquote> and <cite>, one of my customers had a similar case to yours, they wanted to use external reviews on TrustPilot, by using blockquote, cite and Schema they have not experience any droppings in rankings.

You can view the code in action by visiting their site and viewing the source on any of their product pages.

Here's the code with Schema itemprop="review":

<blockquote itemtype="http://schema.org/Review" itemscope itemprop="review">
    <h3 itemprop="name">Excellent Service</h3>
    <div itemtype="http://schema.org/Rating" itemscope itemprop="reviewRating">
        <meta content="1" itemprop="worstRating">
        <p><span itemprop="ratingValue">5</span>/<span itemprop="bestRating">5</span> Stars</p>
    </div>
    <p itemprop="description">Write the testimonial here</p>
    <footer>
        <cite>
            <a href="http://example/testimonial-link" itemprop="author">Testimonial by John Doe</a> &ndash; <meta content="2013-21-01" itemprop="datePublished">21 January 2014
        </cite>
    </footer>
</blockquote>

Awhile back I made a online video tutorial, how to use external reviews without punishment and getting those glittering stars in Google search results. If you want stars then Schema review is what you want, otherwise just use blockquote and cite without any additional markup.

Here is the code without Schema:

<blockquote>
    <p>Write the testimonial here</p>
    <footer>
        <cite>
            <a href="http://example/testimonial-link" itemprop="author">Testimonial by John Doe</a> &ndash; <meta content="2013-21-01" itemprop="datePublished">21 January 2014
        </cite>
    </footer>
</blockquote>
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Perfect answer! Cheers!! – closetnoc Mar 14 at 2:55
    
I have a big code, it seems a bit hard to implement. – Matty Mar 28 at 20:04

Just use it as a quote and give the site you are taking it for a credit and I think this should work. Of course you can always change it by using your own words.

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Well I can't change the content, as it is about testimonials. Credit I've already given. How to use it as quote? – Matty Mar 13 at 20:03
    
I guess closetnoc and others answered all your questions and I hope you don't have any doubts right now. I think that Google doesn't always work as automatic as it seems. It's made by people and if you show in two simple ways mentioned earlier that you don't want to take credit from someone's work you and your website will be ok ;) – LiveChatAdam Mar 14 at 21:33

I think if u using source credit and your page has additional value then u ok

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There are a few simple considerations that need to be made.

If you are copying a whole work or most of a work, such as a complete page or most of a page so that your page is a significant copy of the original, then you should do two things. One, it is advisable to create a link to the original work. Two, create a canonical tag to the work.

If you are copying a segment of a work, such as a quote or series of quotes from different pages, then you should do two things. One, place the quote within a blockquote tag of other mechanism that distinguishes the quote from the rest of the content. Two, it is advisable to create a link to the original work.

Duplicate content does not include quotes or small portions of content from another work. Duplicate content is where content is a significant copy of another work so that the new work becomes, in effect, a copy. It does not have to be identical. It just has to be enough to be confusing between which work is the original. It should help you to understand fair use as defined in the U.S. Copyright law. Fair use allows you to quote or reference a work in your own work when you are adding value to the original work. If you are simply quoting simple portions of the original work in your own work, that should be enough for search.

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I'm copying a whole testimonials page of an affiliate product. I need those testimonials in my article. Already thought about using the text as an image, but the article has too many images already. – Matty Mar 13 at 22:12
    
It's like 25 testimonials. – Matty Mar 13 at 22:13
    
I just need to tell google not to index that portion of text. About copyright, I won't have any problema with that, I just don't want the article to be penalized. By the way, the article itself (Without the testimonials part), has over 6000 words. – Matty Mar 13 at 22:14
    
I was not talking about copyright per se', just using it as an example. If you copy all 25 testimonials, you may be copying too much. Still, using a blockquote tag per testimonial used and a link back to the original work should exist. As well, I am concerned that your article will be too long. It is extremely difficult to focus longer content so that it performs well in search. Generally, longer content becomes diluted by trying to include too many thoughts or too repetitive overall. – closetnoc Mar 13 at 22:20
    
the article is ok. I'm only concerned about the testimonials part. – Matty Mar 13 at 22:24

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