Webmasters Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for pro webmasters. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

We are legally obliged in a few months to obtain consent from users to allow us to store any cookies on the users PC.

My query is, what would be the most effective way of storing this consent to ensure that users don't get repeat requests to give consent in the future, obviously for authenticated users I can store this against their profile. But what about for non-authenticated users.

My initial thought, ironically, was to store given consent in a cookie..?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could do it by IP, however I think your cookie solution to the cookie-consent is in concurrence. :)

But seriously though, a consent cookie seems like the best solution. Give a little popup-window, and if they click 'Consent', then store the cookie. Check for that upon visiting any page.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I wanted to exhaust all options, but this does seem to be the most effective way of storing it. – Mantorok Feb 10 '11 at 11:18
    
And if they say no, they don't want cookies? Do you store that fact in a cookie? – Tim Fountain Feb 10 '11 at 13:38
    
No - if they deny then you can store their IP and have it cross-check the list before asking if they want to consent. – Christopher Feb 10 '11 at 13:41
1  
I'd happily give +1 for the cookie option, but I can't give +1 for the IP option - as @Mark points out, consumer ISP will reuse IP's for different connections, so if I refuse, but my neighbour accepts, and later our IPs switch and you start storing cookies I'd not be happy. Equally, companies often have multiple users behind a single firewall all sharing an external IP address. This needs to be a per-user setting - at the machine level... – Zhaph - Ben Duguid Apr 3 '12 at 14:20
1  
@Micky's solution seems to be the most practical, even if it is less intuitive. But then again, this whole situation begs for awkwardly made solutions in the interest of protecting those without the intelligence to protect themselves. – Christopher Apr 4 '12 at 4:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.