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i read an article which says "If you have multiple language versions of a URL, each language page must identify all language versions, including itself".

Both the UK and USA urls contain the same content in english, would i still have to specify both versions on Hreflang on both urls.

IE include both urls on both the UK and USA, i was unsure as it state for mutiple languages, whereas mine is both in english, ie UK and USA.

<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-us" my us url/"/>
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-uk" my uk url/"/>

or would i put just one alternative on each url, UK on USA and USA and UK hreflang?

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1 Answer 1

In short, yes, include links to both versions on both URLs.

The hreflang attribute is used as a signal to help search engines offer a specific version of your website in search results. Observant visitors will expect the content to be in their dialect of English (British English, American English) but that's beside the point.

Google's Webmaster Tools has an excellent resource on the topic that addresses your case.

It's a good idea to provide a generic URL for geographically unspecified users if you have several alternate URLs targeted at users with the same language, but in different locales. For example, you may have specific URLs for English speakers in Ireland (en-ie), Canada (en-ca), and Australia (en-au), but want all other English speakers to see your generic English (en) page, and everyone else to see the homepage. In this case you should specify the generic English-language (en) page for searchers in, say, the UK. You can annotate this cluster of pages using a Sitemap file or using HTML link tags like this:

<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-ie" hreflang="en-ie" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-ca" hreflang="en-ca" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en-au" hreflang="en-au" />
<link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/en" hreflang="en" />

Source: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/189077?hl=en

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Sorry could you clarify, are you saying yes I need both, just want to make absolutely sure, as i mentioned single as well as both in original post. Also would it be better to use en-gb or en for the UK, as users can buy games in the UK. –  user3185451 Jul 26 at 14:00
    
No problem, I edited my answer to help clarify :) Another thing to keep in mind is that hreflang helps serve pages based on language settings which do not always correlate to regions. For example, living in Canada I've often had to specify language setting of en-gb simply because en-ca is not always available. To redirect users based on region you may want to look into doing IP location tests too. –  Peter Toi Jul 28 at 22:47

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