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I've been looking at various CDN services, and many of them seem to charge a pretty hefty fee compared to the free shared SSL offering. One in particular, CDN77, is offering private SSL for $700/year.

Why is the price so high? Isn't the only technical difference between a private/public SSL the ability to use a custom domain name? From what I gather, the only difference would be having to send the key/certificate to them yourself, which shouldn't cost nearly $700 a year.

Do they just charge this price because they can?

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closed as off-topic by bybe Jan 10 at 12:03

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is more related to the cost of services operated by companies outside of your control. –  bybe Jan 10 at 12:03
    
I was more looking forward to the underlying technology as to what makes it more expensive. Hopefully, they didn't just charge you money for almost nothing. –  Ivan Topolcic Jan 10 at 22:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Originally, each IP address could only handle one SSL certificate as the incoming SSL connection request didn't specify which host it was trying to access. This has been addressed with the introduction of SNI. While all modern browsers support SNI, older browsers do not and I imagine that the CDN services are still supporting those browsers and not using SNI.

Without SNI, offering a private SSL is costlier as they'll have to assign unique IP addresses to you. IP addresses are a finite resource at this point.

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Thank you! I did not know this. –  Ivan Topolcic Jan 10 at 22:36

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