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I have a traditional SSL cert going to a subdomain secure.mydomain.com on my domain. My host required me to have a dedicated IP in order to do this.

I would also like to use HTTPS on my site for when I log into WordPress, etc. and since this is just for me, I don't mind self signing it and clicking through the scary messages.

Is there a way to use a self signed cert for mydomain.com/wp-admin (just for me) when I already am on a dedicated IP that already has a traditional SSL cert for normal users on secure.mydomain.com?

(FWIW, I'm on WHM without root access.)

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1 Answer 1

If you can install a certificate for your domain, then you can install as many certs as you like, so long as they are from different CAs. Issues usually arise when you want one cert or one CA to cover multiple domains and subdomains on the same server.

If you are not scared of the warnings because you are already familiar with your server configuration, you might try going to the https version of your site with the current certificate, without changing anything other than https in the address bar of your browser. Depending on how your host installed the cert, it may 'work' on all subdomains of the site.

Edit:

Installing different certificates depends on the server configuration. Coming from nginx, I know this is relatively easy to do. I've never really use Apache except when I did simple share hosting, so I'm not sure how easy it is to configure.

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Thanks Paul. I think there was another answer here that was deleted--is that what you mean when referring to nginx? I wasn't sure what you meant by that. When I type in https://mydomain.com/wp-admin I am redirected to the subdomain the SSL is on (https://secure.mydomain.com). –  brentonstrine Aug 9 '13 at 23:55
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