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I have a slang dictionary website. I saw that they only have the postname / title and there own website as the title. That was what I have, but I want to grow and to get higher on Google, so I changed it to Posttitle ('definition' and 'meaning') > websitename

So I have added the terms definition and meaning, because I think that people look op un a word like What is the meaning or definition of.... Am I overthinking this? Is this overkill? Is it recommended? The post title can exceed the 70 characters, so will that be a problem?

PS: changing it to Posttitle ('what is it') is also a thing that I can do. Is this fine?

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Are you also intending to use exactly the same format as you have given, with single quotes, parentheses and angled brackets? –  w3d Aug 5 '13 at 20:07
    
I am using Yoast SEO and there I have a separator like >> or something. The default separator in Wordpress. And I am doing this (definition/meaning of). Is that bad or so? –  Johan Aug 5 '13 at 22:20
    
That might be OK, but I would certainly avoid unnecessary punctuation like the single quotes, "and", etc. as it just clutters the title and doesn't help SEO. –  w3d Aug 6 '13 at 8:12

2 Answers 2

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Definitely overthinking.

In the past, changing a few words on your page might increase the relevance for those pages in a search engine based on word priority.

Now the way it works (best guess from the industry) is the search engines will mine the content on your page. They use an overall analysis of the page content and less of a focus on the words specifically in the title (and on the main landing pages). Then they will watch links to your site from other sites (especially Social Media) to see if the words on the pages linking to your site are related to your site's content (quality links also matter). If they are, then you are up-ranked for the association.

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So? Let it stay as it is or should I just do it? Is there any harm? If Google does not look at the title anymore, than it's useless of course, but I think they look at it and that's why I want to add these 2 words, because it is relevant to my site. –  Johan Aug 5 '13 at 19:05
    
@Johan Add them, but don't expect any major changes to happen to your SEO because of it. –  AbsoluteƵERØ Aug 5 '13 at 19:27
    
1 percent is 1 percent. Thanks for the answers, appreciated. –  Johan Aug 5 '13 at 19:40

This obviously depends on the length of a definition, but generally I would have thought that putting an entire definition into a title would surely make it massively long!?

As you mentioned, Google will only display approx 70 characters (its actually on pixel width), but words outside of this display limit will still get picked up by Google.

However, if you are putting an entire definition into a title tag, this is going to far and is bordering on keyword stuffing. Keep the definition in the body content, it will still get picked up by Search Engines.

I'd suggest researching some other dictionary websites, see how they do it then do something similar. I think most would do some thing like:

Slang Word - Definition of Slang Word by Website Name
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Regarding SEO, search engines and visitors, Slang word definition or meaning | Website name can also be a good solution (shorter and less keyword stuffing). –  Zistoloen Aug 5 '13 at 11:35
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No no, you are getting it wrong. I am putting the word definition there, not a definiton... So that if you search on Google to meaning of ...., that they will get on my site. Not the whole definition because that's too much indeed. –  Johan Aug 5 '13 at 14:16
    
Sorry misunderstood! Sounds fine then! –  Max Aug 6 '13 at 2:06

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