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I'm having problems trying to define a CNAME from blog.mydomain.com to domains.tumblr. I'm using directadmin DNS Administration.

I've added a sub-domain named blog.mydomain.com and then in DNS Administration have defined the following: enter image description here Name: "blog.mydomain.com" Value: "domains.tumblr.com."

When I try to add a dot at the end of the field, I'm an error:

    Unable to save dns zone: named-zonecheck returned:
loading "blog.mydomain.com" from "/var/named/blog.mydomain.com.db.temp" class "IN"
dns_master_load: /var/named/blog.mydomain.com.db.temp:32: blog.mydomain.com: CNAME and other data
zone blog.mydomain.com/IN: loading master file /var/named/blog.mydomain.com.db.temp: CNAME and other data

If I understood correctly, without the dot at the end might make my CNAME be directed to a wrong relative URL, unless this is something directadmin resolves on his own.

Is that my problem? If so, what does this error mean? (and I can I resolve it)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe the problem is that you've created the subdomain "blog.mydomain.com" already, and are trying to recreate that subdomain with the CNAME record. Try deleting the subdomain you've already created, and then try adding the CNAME record.

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I wasn't aware the CNAME is INSTEAD of a sub-domain, and that it should be part of the DNS of mydomain.com. Thanks! –  Noam Jul 15 '13 at 6:43
1  
Creating a "subdomain" the way you initially did simply creates an A-record for that hostname. An A-record must have an IP address associated with it, whereas a CNAME record essentially just forwards to the request to the new host defined in the record. Most hosting companies could probably make this clearer to users, as it's not always obvious. –  nathangiesbrecht Jul 15 '13 at 15:38

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