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We develop and sell ActiveX and .NET controls through our website. After doing some redesign works, every product will have its own top-level folder on the webserver. For instance, the home page for our ActiveX grid control looks like our_domain.com/activex-grid/.

We also need to provide our users with a lot of screenshots used in the product pages. Looking at all this, what is the best location and folder name for these images from SEO perspective (mainly Google Indexing and Image Search)?

We have several possible solutions:

  1. our_domain.com/activex-grid/images/
  2. our_domain.com/activex-grid-images/
  3. our_domain.com/activex-grid/screenshots/
  4. our_domain.com/activex-grid-screenshots/
  5. our_domain.com/activex-grid/

The last option means we will place images next to the HTML pages, but we would not want to use this mix of image files and pages as it is harder to organize/find our data in this case. However, I admit the last option can be the best for SEO as (1) we do not have extra unneeded keywords like 'images' or 'screenshots' in full image URLS and (2) we do not place our images in deep folders so the keywords used in URLs have less value.

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marked as duplicate by Su', bybe, John Conde Apr 21 '13 at 18:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Have just found this: webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/36434/…. The author states that "you can use whatever file names & URL structure that makes sense for your site" and "we use a lot of signals to pick up information about an image" (in addition to URL). –  TecMan Apr 19 '13 at 14:58

1 Answer 1

I would use the screenshots subfolder as it's descriptive of what the image is. I wouldn't describe it as an "unneeded keyword", because it will help search engines, and people, understand exactly what the content there is.

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