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Does the Google spider render JavaScript?

I'm writing an article that is broken up into sections, where the content of each section is hidden unless the user expands that section.

To be more concrete, this is what I am talking about: http://jqueryui.com/accordion/#collapsible.

In that example, the text for "Section 1" is visible whereas the text for all of the other sections do not appear.

My question is, will the text contained in those other sections be accessible to search engines?

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marked as duplicate by John Conde Jan 21 '13 at 3:01

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2 Answers 2

If the content is post-processed by a javascript script, the contents are not visible to search engines.

Basically because the robot or spiders is not capable of processing the scripts and this will lower the quality of indexing your web content.

But, I tested your plugin it seems that the content is available in both live mode to read-spider mode

screenshot

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thanks man, that's good to know. If possible, could you tell me what tool you used to check whether or not the content was available in read-spider mode? –  kyphos Jan 20 '13 at 21:09
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short answer: tools.seobook.com/general/spider-test ... tiny answer: right-click > view source code. –  RTOSkit Jan 20 '13 at 21:13
    
Ahh I see, thanks for teaching me to fish ;) –  kyphos Jan 20 '13 at 21:30
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It is no longer strictly true that robots does not process scripts (at least Googlebot does, and Google is what matters).

Google has put online a document telling you what you need to do to make your AJAX application crawlable.

To be crawled, the crawler needs to find a "pretty AJAX URL" (that is, a URL containing a #! hash fragment). It then requests the content for this URL from your server in a slightly modified form. Your web server returns the content in the form of an HTML snapshot, which is then processed by the crawler.

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It is a good analysis(+1), but currently, this is not a large scale methodology adopted, and most are based on the scanner indexing of the simple content. –  RTOSkit Jan 21 '13 at 8:57
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