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I have a website (www.ayrshireminis.com), which has three main sections under different directories, these are:

/forum
/galleries
/contact

I would like to have an aggregated view of the data for the whole website, but also for each section.

What is the recommended approach for doing this?

I believe I can create a web property that includes a profile for the entire website and duplicated filtered profiles, each section having an include filter.

This is my gut instinct, but i'd like to know if there is another (better) way to do it? Maybe by having one account that includes a profile for the whole site and another profile with an include filter for the individual sections?

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2 Answers

The most common approach is to have a single Web Property for the whole site and different profiles. One for everything and one for each specific part of the site.

Note that depending on the data you want to see for every part of the site one single profile may be enough. You can try the content drill down report that will give you data aggregated by path with some metrics like pageviews and unique pageviews.

The approach to have one web property for each site is less recommended because it means you need to have 2 trackers on every page, one for that part of the site Web Property and another one for the roll-up data. That is not recommended because multi-account tracking is currently not officially supported by analytics and because it means twice the effort to track data in your site.

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Segments sound like the best and easiest solution, you also have historic data. Content grouping is another approach you can try. You can create a segment for the forum section with a condition that includes all pages with "forum" in the URI. No need for filters or other views, though you can setup those just for best measures (with no historic data).

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