Take the 2-minute tour ×
Webmasters Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for pro webmasters. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need a solution to store my big files (50MB+ each). Currently I am using an European dedicated server (100MBits) with 8000GB/month at 60 USD.

I would like to use a cloud service that automatically fetches my files from my server the first time users request it (like a classic cdn) (So I can have all files stored within 1 server)

I was looking at Amazon CloudFront and, to get the same bandwidth 8'000 GB/month, I have to pay like 2000 USD vs my 60 USD of my dedicated server.

Is there a cheaper alternative?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're trying to compare apples to a multi-national supplier of apples and get the latter for the same price as a $60 crate of apples.

Amazon's CloudFront offers geographical distribution, tons of fault tolerance, and redundancy. If a drive crashes, your data is probably safe. If the US goes under water, it could be safe as well.

With your current solution, if your data center loses power, you might have access to your data. You didn't mention anything about fault tolerance with your existing configuration, so I am assuming there is none.

You won't find something that utilizes hundreds (thousands?) of servers for the same price as something that utilizes one server, unless you have very minimal requirements in terms of bandwidth and storage.

share|improve this answer
    
just to add to my above awnser i think (correct me if im wrong) that dropbox runs on amazons s3 –  sam Nov 3 '12 at 11:53
    
The answer is of course "it depends". Dropbox might change what they deploy on. If you want a guarantee that your data is going to be highly available, then you need to deploy it specifically on something that is always going to be highly available. That's what Amazon offers. Dropbox offers a simple way for you to share your files "in the cloud". Remember, "in the cloud" could just mean it's part of a data warehouse but not necessarily distributed for reliability. –  Michael J. Gray Nov 3 '12 at 22:58
    
I don't think that justify the overpricee –  dynamic Nov 4 '12 at 18:52
    
@yes123 You may think it is over priced, however they are the ones offering the service. You're welcome to build your own enterprise CDN and resell your excess for $10 / month. –  Michael J. Gray Nov 4 '12 at 21:59
add comment

really depends what your looking for - download wise, how often the files would be accessed. A simple free solution that you could try is putting them up onto drop box and share the public download link ?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I could do that. But this solution seems a bit unlegit. I don't want to pay nothing. I want to pay for a good service but not so overpriced –  dynamic Nov 1 '12 at 11:01
    
You can always pay for the Pro plan if paying makes it feel more legit to you. dropbox.com/pricing and since dropbox uses amazon for their system you'll get that in a way as well. –  AWinter Nov 1 '12 at 11:02
    
Dropbox limits the bandwidth you can use. I can't use dropbox as a cdn really –  dynamic Nov 1 '12 at 11:20
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.